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The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Listening Sessions and Workshops Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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C Listening Sessions and Workshops Information LISTENING SESSIONS The committee actively solicited input about lived mentoring experiences via “­istening sessions.” These activities lasted between 45 and 90 minutes (depending on l the venue) and included an overview of the science of mentorship. The participants were then guided through three activities by 1 to 3 members of the committee: 1) they wrote down questions or ideas about theory, research, and practice of mentorship; 2) they discussed their lived mentoring experiences in small groups, focusing on what they had found to be useful for effective mentoring relationships; and 3) they described characteristics, features, and content that might be useful for the online guide. In total, 18 sessions were held at the following venues: • American Psychological Association (August 11, 2018) • University of Maryland Student Success Institute (August 18, 2018) • A discussion with graduate students and postdocs from the University of Virginia (September 24, 2018) • Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Graduate, Research, Education, and Training (GREAT) Group (September 27, 2018) • National Institutes of Health (NIH) Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) Consortium meeting (October 24, 2018) • University of New Mexico Mentoring Institute (October 25, 2018) • Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Mentoring Institute (October 27, 2018; two sessions) 263 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

264 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M • American Physical Society Bridge Program (November 16–18, 2018) • University of California, Irvine (November 28, 2018) • A discussion with graduate students and postdocs from Princeton University (September 24, 2018) • American Geophysical Union (December 10–14, 2018) • University of Virginia PhD Plus program launch ( January 17, 2019; two sessions) • American Association for the Advancement of Sciences Annual Meeting (Febru- ary 15, 2019) • American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (February 28, 2019) • International Mentoring Association (March 12, 2019) • National Society for Black Engineers (March 29, 2019) WORKSHOPS The committee hosted three evidence- and information-gathering workshops: in Washington, D.C., on April 11–12, 2018; in Irvine, California, on October 8, 2018; and at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, on February 5, 2019. Workshop 1 Workshop on Inclusive Mentorship Excellence in STEMM: New Knowledge, Ideas, and Practice (Washington, D.C., April 11–12, 2018) Designed to identify successful evidence-based practices and metrics for mentor- ship in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine) career pathways, the first workshop targeted 40 to 50 thought leaders in practice, research, and theory related to effective mentorship in STEMM. The particular focus of the event was on identifying emergent knowledge, theories, research methods, and practices across disciplines, domains, and developmental stages. Agenda April 11, 2018   National Academy of Sciences Building, Washington, DC Time Event Location 9:45 Workshop framing remarks • Angela Byars-Winston, University of Wisconsin–Madison West Court • Richard (Rick) McGee, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine 10:15 Topic 1: New methods and approaches • Lillian Turner Eby, University of Georgia West Court PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 265 10:45 Facilitated breakout session 1 • Team A (Domain) West Court • Team B (Discipline) Lecture Room • Team C (Developmental Stage) East Court • Team D (Domain) NAS 114 • Team E (Discipline) NAS 118 • Team F (Developmental Stage) NAS 360 12:00 Lunch West Court 13:00 Topic 2: Assessment and metrics • Chris Pfund, University of Wisconsin–Madison • Angela Byars-Winston, University of Wisconsin–Madison West Court 13:30 Facilitated breakout session 2 • Team A (Discipline) NAS 118 • Team B (Developmental Stage) NAS 360 • Team C (Domain) West Court • Team D (Discipline) Lecture Room • Team E (Developmental Stage) East Court • Team F (Domain) NAS 114 14:45 Break West Court 15:15 Topic 3: Team and other forms of mentorship • Linda Pololi, Brandeis and C-Change West Court 15:45 Facilitated breakout session 3 • Team A (Developmental Stage) East Court • Team B (Domain) NAS 114 • Team C (Discipline) NAS 118 • Team D (Developmental Stage) NAS 360 • Team E (Domain) West Court • Team F (Discipline) Lecture Room 17:00 Break West Court 17:30 Reception West Court 18:00 Dinner West Court 18:45 Plenary speaker • Nora Dominguez, Mentoring Institute and International Mentoring Association West Court 19:15 Discussion West Court 19:30 Adjourn day 1 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

266 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M April 12  National Academy of Sciences Building, Washington, DC 9:30 Open breakfast West Court 10:00 Reconvening remarks • Angela Byars-Winston, University of Wisconsin–Madison West Court 10:15 Topic 4: Cross- or interdisciplinary perspectives • Audrey Murrell, University of Pittsburgh West Court 10:45 Facilitated breakout session 4 • Domain West Court • Discipline NAS 250 • Developmental Stage NAS 280 12:00 Lunch West Court 12:45 Breakout group reports and closing remarks West Court 13:15 Adjourn Workshop Participants1 David Asai Senior Director of Science Education Howard Hughes Medical Institute Keshia Ashe AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow Division of Computer and Network Systems at the National Science Foundation Erika Brown Bridge Program Manager and Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) Program Manager American Physical Society Fay Cobb Payton Program Director Division of Computer and Network Systems at the National Science Foundation Nora Dominguez – Speaker Director The Mentoring Institute Lillian Eby – Speaker Professor of Psychology and Director of Owens Institute for Behavioral Research University of Georgia Amanda Field Science Policy Specialist Association of American Medical Colleges 1    Titles and affiliations of participants are those given at the date of the event. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 267 Christine Grant Associate Dean of Faculty Advancement and Professor of Chemical Engineering North Carolina State University Racquel Jemison Senior Education Associate and Manager of ACS Scholars Program American Chemical Society Maha Khalid Assistant Director of the Center for Psychology in Schools and Education American Psychological Association Janis Kupersmidt President and Senior Research Scientist innovation Research & Training (iRT) William Massey Edwin S. Wilsey Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Operations Research and Financial Engineering Princeton University David May Education and Diversity Programs Manager American Physical Society Renita Miller Dean of Berkeley College Yale University Leo Morales Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) and Adjunct Professor of Health Services University of Washington School of Public Health Carol Muller Executive Director WISE Ventures, Stanford University Audrey Murrell – Speaker Associate Dean of the College of Business Administration and Associate Professor of Business Administration, Psychology, and Public and International Affairs University of Pittsburgh Hironao Okahana Associate Vice President, Research and Policy Analysis Council of Graduate Schools Suzanne Ortega President Council of Graduate Schools PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

268 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M Becky Packard Professor of Psychology and Education Mount Holyoke College Colette Patt Assistant Dean, Mathematical and Physical Sciences University of California, Berkeley Linda Pololi – Speaker Senior Scientist Women’s Studies Research Center, Brandeis University Mercedes Rubio Program Director for Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity National Institute of General Medical Sciences Christiane Spitzmueller Professor of Industrial Organizational Psychology University of Houston Rena Subotnik Director of the Center for Psychology in Schools and Education American Psychological Association Iris Wagstaff STEM Program Director American Association for the Advancement of Science Steven Wallace Professor of Community Health Services University of California, Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health Maggie Walser Director of Education and Capacity Building Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Jamie White Special Assistant to Director, Office of the Director National Institutes of Health Jodi Yellin Director of Science Policy Association of American Medical Colleges PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 269 Workshop 2 Participatory Workshop on Metrics, Models, and Identities in STEMM Mentoring Relationships: What Works and Why? (Irvine, California, October 8, 2018) During the second workshop, researchers, mentors, and mentees came together to develop a shared understanding of preliminary drafts of the three commissioned papers. This day-long event was designed to examine the evidence and engage the presentations from scholarly as well as lived experiences. Agenda October 8, 2018  Beckman Center, Irvine CA Time Event Location 8:15 a.m. Breakfast Dining Room 8:45 a.m. Opening Remarks Huntington Room • Angela Byars-Winston, Chair 9:00 a.m. Commissioned Paper on the Role of Identity in Huntington Room Mentorship • Ebony McGee, Vanderbilt University 9:15 a.m. Large Group Discussion Huntington Room 9:45 a.m. Coffee, Snacks, and Break into Groups 10:00 a.m. Affinity Group Sessions • Underrepresented minoritized medical/biomedical Board Room students. • Multiple Intersectional Marginalization. Back Bay Room • The difference in perceived value added by Balboa Room mentoring programs at MSIs in general, and HBCUs in particular. • How the Institutional Structure of Tenure and Crystal Cove Promotion undermines optima faculty-advisee Room mentoring practices. • Accountability in distributed mentoring models Executive Dining (i.e., when mentoring is distributed who is Room accountable for ensuring success). • Understanding the limitations of mentoring. Huntington Room 11:15 a.m. Break 11:30 a.m. Commissioned Paper on Metrics, Assessment, and Huntington Room Evaluation in Mentorship • Paul Hernandez, West Virginia University PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

270 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M 11:45 a.m. Large Group Discussion Huntington Room 12:15 p.m. Lunch and Break into Groups Dining Room 12:45 p.m. Affinity Group Sessions • What mentoring relationship qualities (e.g., support Board Room experiences) are not adequately represented in assessments from mentee, mentor, or institutional/ programmatic perspectives? • What developmental aspects of the mentoring Back Bay Room relationship are yet to be adequately described and measured. For example, what aspects of support change (or are expected to change) as mentees transition from undergraduate to graduate to postdoc? • What are the most typical/salient modes or Balboa Room opportunities for reciprocal feedback between mentors and mentees? And what types mentor- mentee reciprocal feedback (e.g., instrumental support received) are most important for the development of high-quality mentoring relationships? • What do negative mentoring experiences look like Crystal Cove (i.e., how do they manifest) in postsecondary Room STEMM contexts? How do negative experiences differ across mentee, mentor, and institutional perspectives? • Which aspects of the mentoring relationship (i.e., Executive Dining which types of support experiences) are most Room important for (a) short-, medium-, and long-term career outcomes of mentees or (b) scholarly outcomes (e.g., productivity) of both the mentors and the mentees? And, which types of support experiences are most important at different developmental stages (e.g., 1st-year undergraduate, 4th-year undergraduate, postdoc)? 2:00 p.m. Break 2:15 p.m. Commissioned Paper on Non-Dyadic Models of Huntington Room Mentorship • Beronda Montgomery, Michigan State University • Stephani Page, Duke University 2:30 p.m. Large Group Discussion Huntington Room 3:00 p.m. Coffee, Snacks, and Break into Groups PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 271 3:15 p.m. Affinity Group Sessions • Measuring success of non-dyadic mentoring models Board Room • Approaches to integrating non-dyadic mentoring Back Bay Room models into conference/meeting programming (develop a list of best practices) • Where do non-dyadic mentoring models best Balboa Room support inclusivity at the institutional level? • What does institutional/agency support for Crystal Cove non-dyadic mentoring models look like? Room • Accountability in distributed mentoring models Executive Dining (i.e., when mentoring is distributed, who is Room accountable for ensuring success?) • Benefits of non-traditional, non-hierarchical Huntington Room mentoring models (or deconstructing hierarchies in mentoring) 4:30 p.m. Break 4:45 p.m. Mentee Reflection Dinner Talk Huntington Room • David Esparza, UTEP • Jeremy Waisome, UF • Philip Vieira, CSU—Dominguez Hills • Moderator: Renetta Tull, University System of Maryland 5:15 p.m. Large Group Discussion Huntington Room 5:45 p.m. Reception Dining Terrace 6:15 p.m. Dinner Dining Terrace 7:00 p.m. Discussion and Reflection—Listening Session Lite Huntington Room • Christiane Spitzmueller, University of Houston • Maria Lund Dahlberg, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 7:30 p.m. Adjourn Participants2 Moses Adenaike Consulting Senior Analyst Accenture Aixa Alfonso Associate Professor and Principal Investigator, HSI STEMM Grant University of Illinois at Chicago 2    Titles and affiliations of participants are those given at the date of the event. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

272 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M Adriana Bankston Associate Director of Fundraising & Strategic Initiatives Future of Research Frank Bayliss Professor San Francisco State University Elizabeth Boylan Program Director Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Arianna Brown Graduate Student and Co-Founder of UCI PACE Program University of California, Irvine Erika Brown (online participant) APS Bridge Program Manager American Physical Society Brian Burt Assistant Professor of Higher Education Iowa State University Natascha Buswell Assistant Teaching Professor University of California, Irvine Lina Dahlberg Assistant Professor Western Washington University Franklin Dollar Assistant Professor University of California, Irvine David Esparza – Speaker Undergraduate Research Assistant University of Texas at El Paso Mica Estrada Associate Professor University of California, San Francisco Amanda Field (online participant) Science Policy Specialist Association of American Medical Colleges Alison Gammie (online participant) Director Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity National Institute of General Medical Sciences /National Institutes of Health PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 273 Laura Gelles (online participant) Graduate Research Assistant Utah State University Carol Gross Professor University of California, San Francisco Carlos Gutierrez Professor of Chemistry California State University, Los Angeles Paul Hernandez – Speaker Assistant Professor West Virginia University Theresa Hernandez Ph.D. Student and Research Assistant University of Southern California Claire Horner-Devine Founder and Co-Director Counterspace Consulting, and University of Washington Racquel Jemison (online participant) ACS Scholars Program Manager American Chemical Society Jeanose Lexima (online participant) President Women on Change Cara Margherio Assistant Director Center for Evaluation & Research for STEM Equity University of Washington Ebony McGee – Speaker Associate Professor Vanderbilt University Beronda Montgomery – Speaker MSU Foundation Professor Michigan State University Renita Miller (online participant) Associate Dean of Access, Diversity, and Inclusion Princeton University Joi Mondisa Assistant Professor University of Michigan PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

274 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M Danielle Morales Assistant Professor University of Texas at El Paso Diane O’Dowd Vice Provost, Academic Personnel University of California, Irvine Stephani Page – Speaker Postdoctoral Research Associate Duke Molecular Physiology Institute Duke University Becky Packard (online participant) Professor of Psychology and Education Mount Holyoke College Katy Rodriguez Wimberly Graduate Student and Co-Founder of UCI PACE Program University of California, Irvine, Department of Physics and Astronomy Erin Sanders O’Leary (online participant) Director, Center for Education Innovation University of California, Los Angeles Elizabeth Silva Associate Dean for Graduate Programs University of California, San Francisco Latishya Steele (online participant) Director, Biosciences Programs and Curriculum Stanford Medicine Joann Trejo Professor University of California, San Diego Laura Tucker Assistant Professor of Teaching University of California, Irvine Philip Vieira – Speaker Assistant Professor California State University, Dominguez Hills Jeremy Waisome – Speaker Postdoctoral Associate University of Florida Jasmine Wall Founder Mathematics Literacy Project PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 275 Yunyao Xie Graduate Student University of California, Irvine Joyce Yen (online participant) Director University of Washington Workshop 3 Workshop on Inclusive Mentorship Excellence in STEMM: New Knowledge, Ideas, and Practice (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, February 5, 2019) The third and final evidence- and information-gathering workshop facilitated scholars, mentors, and mentees in imagining how to realize an evidence-based, online resource guide on mentorship. This 1-day event was designed to clarify the purpose and scope of the online resource, identify users and use cases, and define the desirable functionalities of the final product. Agenda February 5, 2019   Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN Time Event Location 9:00 a.m. Breakfast Sarratt 216/220 9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks Sarratt 216/220 • Juan Gilbert, University of Florida 9:45 a.m. Framing Talks Sarratt 216/220 • Terrell Russell, RENCI • Sean Fox, SERC 10:30 a.m. Large Group Discussion Sarratt 216/220 11:00 a.m. Coffee, Snacks, Break 11:15 a.m. Breakout Group 1 (Organized by Career Stage) • Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars Sarratt 216/220 • Assistant Professors Rand 306 • Associated Professors Sarratt 325 • Full Professors and Chairs Sarratt 363 • Program Directors and Researchers Sarratt 112 • Administrators Sarratt 327 12:30 p.m. Lunch Sarratt 216/220 1:00 p.m. Report Back and Large Group Discussion Sarratt 216/220 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

276 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M 1:45 p.m. Breakout Group 2 (Organized by Discipline) • Social Sciences Sarratt 216/220 • Computer Sciences and Technology Rand 306 • Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Engineering Sarratt 112 • Medical Sciences Sarratt 363 • Life Sciences 1 Sarratt 327 • Life Sciences 2 Sarratt 325 3:00 p.m. Coffee, Snacks, Break 3:30 p.m. Report Back and Large Group Discussion Sarratt 216/220 4:15 p.m. Breakout Group 3 (Organized to Cross-Sectors) • Group 1 Sarratt 363 • Group 2 Rand 306 • Group 3 Sarratt 112 • Group 4 Sarratt 216/220 • Group 5 Sarratt 325 • Group 6 Sarratt 327 5:30 p.m. Coffee, Snacks, Break 5:45 p.m. Summation Talk Sarratt 216/220 • Angela Byars-Winston, University of Wisconsin– Madison 6:15 p.m. Dinner Sarratt 216/220 7:45 p.m. Adjourn Registrants3 Monica Anderson Associate Professor University of Alabama Keshia Ashe (online registrant) AAAS Fellow National Science Foundation Adriana Bankston (online registrant) Policy and Advocacy Fellow Society for Neuroscience Toluwanimi Bello (online registrant) Graduate Student Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 3    Titles and affiliations of registrants are those given at the time of registration. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 277 Cynthia Brame Associate Director, Center for Teaching Vanderbilt University Roger Chalkley Senior Associate Dean Vanderbilt University G. Andrés Cisneros (online registrant) Professor University of North Texas Nora Dominguez (online registrant) Director Mentoring Institute, University of New Mexico Eric Figueroa Student Vanderbilt University Sean Fox – Speaker Technical Director Carleton College Maryrose Franko (online registrant) Executive Director Health Research Alliance Johnna Frierson (online registrant) Director, Diversity and Inclusion Duke University/Pratt School of Engineering Cynthia Fuhrmann (online registrant) Assistant Dean, Career and Professional Development University of Massachusetts Medical School Angel Garcia (online registrant) Assistant Professor of Geology James Madison University Kinnis Gosha Assistant Professor Morehouse College Lisa Green Interim Chair, Mathematical Sciences Middle Tennessee State University Giovanna Guerrero (online registrant) Executive Director Ciencia Puerto Rico PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

278 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M Paul Hernandez Assistant Professor West Virginia University Theresa Hernandez (online registrant) Doctoral Student University of Southern California Claire Horner-Devine (online registrant) Founder Counterspace Consulting Yasmeen Hussain (online registrant) Policy Analyst and Program Manager University of Massachusetts Medical School Jerlando Jackson Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education University of Wisconsin–Madison Janis Kupersmidt (online registrant) Senior Research Scientist Innovation Research & Training Rose Llanos (online registrant) Assistant Director Nova Southeastern University Ebony McGee Associate Professor Vanderbilt University Joi Mondisa Assistant Professor, Engineering University of Michigan Danielle Morales (online registrant) Assistant Professor University of Texas at El Paso Ashley Morris Associate Professor of Biology Middle Tennessee State University Dara Naphan-Kingery Postdoctoral Researcher Vanderbilt University Tolu Omokehinde Graduate Student Vanderbilt University PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix C 279 Becky Packard (online registrant) Professor of Psychology and Education Mount Holyoke College Mercedes Piedra (online registrant) Director UC Davis Health University of California, Davis Monica Ridgeway Postdoctoral Researcher Vanderbilt University Sharon Rivera (online registrant) Director Tacoma Community College John-David Rocha (online registrant) Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Materials Science Rochester Institute of Technology Ginger Rowell Professor of Mathematics Middle Tennessee State University Juan Pablo Ruiz Villalobos Postdoctoral Researcher University of Wisconsin–Madison Terrell Russell – Speaker Chief Technologist, iRODS Consortium Renaissance Computing Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Elisabeth Schussler Associate Professor University of Tennessee Lisa Schwiebert Professor, Senior Associate Dean University of Alabama at Birmingham, Graduate School Linda Sealy Associate Dean Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Harinder Singh (online registrant) Academic Coordinator University of California, Irvine Desmond Stubbs Director of STEM Diversity Initiatives Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

280 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M Miguel Velez-Reyes (online registrant) Chair and Professor University of Texas at El Paso Jeremy Waisome Postdoctoral Associate/iAAMCS Project Manager University of Florida Kennedy Wekesa Dean and Professor of Biology Alabama State University Jamie White (online registrant) Health Science Policy Analyst National Institutes of Health Christopher S. Williams Associate Dean, MSTP Director Vanderbilt University Mike Wyss Professor and Director University of Alabama at Birmingham PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Next: Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies »
The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM Get This Book
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Mentorship is a catalyst capable of unleashing one’s potential for discovery, curiosity, and participation in STEMM and subsequently improving the training environment in which that STEMM potential is fostered. Mentoring relationships provide developmental spaces in which students’ STEMM skills are honed and pathways into STEMM fields can be discovered. Because mentorship can be so influential in shaping the future STEMM workforce, its occurrence should not be left to chance or idiosyncratic implementation. There is a gap between what we know about effective mentoring and how it is practiced in higher education.

The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM studies mentoring programs and practices at the undergraduate and graduate levels. It explores the importance of mentorship, the science of mentoring relationships, mentorship of underrepresented students in STEMM, mentorship structures and behaviors, and institutional cultures that support mentorship. This report and its complementary interactive guide present insights on effective programs and practices that can be adopted and adapted by institutions, departments, and individual faculty members.

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