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The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM (2019)

Chapter: Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Page 281
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
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Page 282
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 283
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 284
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 285
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 286
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 287
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25568.
×
Page 288

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D Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS ANGELA BYARS-WINSTON, Ph.D. (chair) is a professor in the University of ­Wisconsin– Madison (UW) Department of Medicine. She is currently director of research and evalu- ation in the UW Center for Women’s Health Research and associate director of the UW Collaborative Center for Health Equity. She investigates cultural influences on academic and career development, especially for underrepresented groups in the sciences, engineer- ing, and medicine and co-leads several National Institutes of Health (NIH)–funded studies on mentoring of culturally diverse trainees in the sciences. She is co-investigator on the NIH-funded National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) in the Mentor Training Core through which she is leading the Culturally Aware Mentorship initiative. She was selected as a 2011 Champion of Change by the White House for her research efforts to diversify science fields, is an elected fellow of the American Psychological Association, and received the 2018 John Holland Award for Outstanding Achievement in Career or Personality Research from the Society of Counseling Psychology. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) and the STEM Equity Pipeline National Advisory Board. ERIN DOLAN, Ph.D., is a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and ­Georgia Athletic Association Professor of Innovative Science Education at the University of Georgia. She served as founding executive director of the Texas Institute for Discovery Education in Sciences (TIDES), the teaching innovation initiative in the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on social and 281 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

282 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M psychological mechanisms of student development in the context of research, including the influence of research mentors. She has designed and led a wide range of professional development on active learning and mentoring, including intensive sessions for faculty to develop course-based undergraduate research experiences. She is also the editor-in- chief of the CBE—Life Sciences Education journal. JUAN E. GILBERT, Ph.D., is the Andrew Banks Family Preeminence Endowed Profes- sor and Chair of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Department at the University of Florida where he leads the Human Experience Research Lab. He serves as director of the Institute for African American Mentoring in Computing Sci- ences (iAAMCS). He is also a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, a fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). In 2012, he received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring from President Barack Obama. He also received the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2014 Mentor Award. Dr. Gilbert received the 2018 Computer Research Association’s A. Nico Habermann Award. SYLVIA HURTADO, Ph.D., is a professor in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), in the Division of Higher Education and Organizational Change. She served as director of the Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA, and previously as the director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, University of Michigan. Her numer- ous publications focus on student development in different college contexts, campus climate, and developing inclusive science practices to diversify STEM fields. She is past president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) and a member of the National Academy of Education. She received the Social Justice in Education Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in 2018. Recent research projects include the pathways of underrepresented students in scientific research and professional careers (National Institutes of Health/National Science Foundation), the college experiences of high-achieving low-income college students (Jack Kent Cooke Foundation), and student retention and organizational strategies of diverse and broad access institutions in higher education (Spencer Foundation). Her A.B. degree is in soci- ology from Princeton University, M.Ed. from Harvard University, and Ph.D. in education from UCLA. LAURA LUNSFORD, Ph.D., is professor and chair of psychology at Campbell Univer- sity. She wrote the definitive Handbook for Managing Mentoring Programs and co-edited the Sage Handbook of Mentoring in addition to having published more than 40 peer- reviewed articles, chapters, and books on mentoring and leadership development. She PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix D 283 has presented on mentoring at conferences sponsored by the European Mentoring and Coaching Council, American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, and American Educational Research Association, among others. The Depart- ment of Education, National Science Foundation, Institute for Education Science, and the Luce Foundation have funded her work. In 2009 she was honored with the International Mentoring Association’s Dissertation Award. She previously was a tenured associate professor at the University of Arizona, directed the Swain Center for executive educa- tion in the Cameron School of Business at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, served as the alumni director at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, and was the founding full-time director of the Park Scholarships at North Carolina State University (NC State). Her B.A. and Ph.D. are from NC State and her M.S. is from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She regularly consults with organizations on creating fantastic mentoring programs. RICHARD (RICK) McGEE, Ph.D., is the associate dean for professional development and a professor of medical education at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. His primary role in this position is to mentor and coach junior faculty begin- ning their independent research programs. A primary element of this work is a unique grant-writing coaching group model he has created. His career evolved to this role starting from 20 years as a basic scientist and merging into leadership of research train- ing programs at multiple institutions. He has developed and tested a number of novel mentoring and group coaching approaches. These roles led to an evolution to actually studying career development of young scientists from the perspective of social science theories and models. He currently leads a group of social and education researchers conducting a large-scale, longitudinal, largely qualitative research study of career devel- opment and decisions of several hundred biomedical Ph.D. students. His group is also studying a novel group career coaching model in a randomized controlled trial, also with several hundred Ph.D. students. All of these and his previous efforts also focused on fostering diversity in academia. CHRISTINE (CHRIS) PFUND, Ph.D., is the Director of the Center for the Improve- ment of Mentored Experiences in Research (CIMER) and a Senior Scientist at Wisconsin Center for Education Research and the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her work focuses on developing, implement- ing, documenting, and studying mentor training interventions across STEMM. She co-authored the curricula Entering Mentoring and several papers documenting the effectiveness of this approach. Currently, Dr. Pfund is co-leading two studies focused on the impact of training on both mentors and mentees and understanding specific factors in mentoring relationships that account for positive student outcomes, including the role of culture. Dr. Pfund is one of the principal investigators of the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN). PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

284 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M CHRISTIANE SPITZMUELLER, Ph.D., is Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology at the University of Houston (UH). Her research focuses on workplace men- toring, technical training, the work-family interface, and employee safety in the energy and health care industries. She served as the managing director for the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Center for ADVANCING UH Faculty Success (ADVANCE) from 2016 to 2019, contributing to increased hiring and promotions for women and women of color in faculty positions. Dr. Spitzmueller serves on the editorial boards for Organizational Research Methods, the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior. Dr. Spitzmueller conducts research across the globe, with a focus on workplaces in sub-Saharan Africa. As the director for the Center for Applied Psychological Research at UH, Dr. Spitzmueller has conducted collaborative research with organizations such as the World Health Organization, ExxonMobil, and BP. Dr. Spitzmueller received her Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from Bowling Green State University and joined the faculty at the University of Houston in 2003, becoming full professor in 2017. KEIVAN G. STASSUN, Ph.D., is a co-investigator for the NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission and chairs the executive committee of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Stevenson Professor of Physics and Astronomy, and the founding director of the First Center for Autism and Innovation at Vanderbilt University. He is also senior associate dean for graduate education and research for the College of Arts and Science and the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA) and holds an adjunct professor of physics appointment at Fisk University. From 2004 to 2015, he served as founding director of the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master’s-to-Ph.D. Bridge Program, through which Vanderbilt has become one of the nation’s top producers of Ph.D.’s to under­ represented minorities in the physical sciences. His research focuses on formation of stars and planetary systems and increasingly involves approaches at the interface of astronomy, physics, computer science, and informatics. He has served on the federal Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee, the NSF Committee for Equal Opportunity in Sci- ence and Engineering, is a recipient of the American Physical Society’s Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach, and is an elected fellow of both the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In 2010, Stassun was invited to give expert testimony on “broadening participation in STEM” to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology. Most recently, Stassun was awarded an HHMI Professor Prize, was named Mentor of the Year by the AAAS, was honored by the White House with a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Engineering, and has been appointed to the National Academy of Sciences Decadal Committee for Astronomy and Astrophysics. RENETTA TULL, Ph.D., is the new vice chancellor for diversity, equity, and inclusion at the University of California, Davis (effective July 2019). Her recent former roles include PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix D 285 associate vice provost for strategic initiatives at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), professor of the practice in UMBC’s College of Engineering and Information Technology, founding director and co–principal investigator (PI) for the 12-institution National Science Foundation University System of Maryland’s (USM) PROMISE AGEP, and co-director/co-PI for the NSF USM’s Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP). She also served the USM as special assistant to the senior vice chancellor for academic and student affairs, and USM director of graduate and professional pipeline development. Nationally, she continues as a board member for the Sloan Scholars Mentoring Network of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Interna- tionally, Tull is the outgoing vice president of Initiatives for the Latin and Caribbean Consortium of Engineering Institutions (LACCEI), and is finishing her role on the global Engineering Report II Team for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). She is an ABET (Engineering Accreditation Board) Claire L. Felbinger Diversity Award winner, and has represented the United States as an Airbus Global Engineering Deans Council Diversity Finalist. She speaks internationally on mentoring, and will be a keynote for the 2019 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Engineering Veracruz (IEEE-ICEV) in Mexico to discuss mentoring and diversity in the context of humanitarian engineering. COMMITTEE STAFF MARIA LUND DAHLBERG is the study director for the Consensus Study on the Science on Effective Mentoring in STEMM for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and a program officer with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) and the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM). Her work with the National Academies spans topics ranging from equity, inclusion, and diversity in science, through science communications, to post- doctoral research experiences, health care, and innovation ecosystems. She came to the National Academies by way of a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellowship, which she received after completing all requirements short of finalizing the dissertation for her doctorate in physics at Pennsylvania State University. Ms. Dahlberg holds a B.A. with high honors in physics from Vassar College and an M.S. in physics from Pennsylvania State University. AUSTEN APPLEGATE is a research associate with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) and the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering and Medi- cine (CWSEM) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to joining the National Academies, he worked in a number of professional fields includ- ing international development, clinical research, and education. Mr. Applegate holds a B.A. in psychology and sociology from Guilford College. There he developed his interest in social science research and policy through his coursework in behavioral medicine, PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

286 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M clinical assessment, public health, health policy, qualitative and quantitative research methodology, race and gender disparities, and social science history. Mr. Applegate plans to pursue a master of public health in the future. KILAN ASHAD-BISHOP was a 2019 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW). She holds a Ph.D. in cancer biology from the University of Miami. Her research focuses on char- acterizing the functional role of genetic factors in triple-negative breast cancer develop- ment and progression. During her graduate studies, Dr. Ashad-Bishop has volunteered with K–12 STEM outreach efforts, served as president of the Black Graduate Student Association, and served as a member of various university-wide diversity and inclusion committees. She also serves on the City of Miami Sea Level Rise Committee, where she combines her research training, community outreach, and advocacy skills to advance policies that prioritize low-income communities in resilience planning. ALLISON BERGER was a senior program assistant for the Policy and Global Affairs (PGA) Division of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is currently at NASA Goddard. Prior to joining PGA, she provided administrative support to the director of the Board on Global Health in the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies, and meeting planning support for the Forum on Global Violence Prevention. During her 15-year tenure with the National Academies, Ms. Berger has supported other program units including the Food and Nutrition Board, the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, and the Innovation to Incubation program (i2I) under the National Academy of Medicine. Prior to joining the National Academies, she served as administrative assistant at the American Psychological Association, where she worked on various activities and programs that promote psychological science in academic and scientific areas of research. Ms. Berger is currently pursuing a certification program to become a Certified Meeting Professional, which is the highest designation for meeting professionals in the meeting and convention planning industry. ADRIANA NAVIA COUREMBIS joined the National Academy of Sciences, Engineer- ing, and Medicine in January 2012 as part of the finance staff for the Policy and Global Affairs Division. In this position she collaborates with the financial management for the Board on Higher Education and Workforce; the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine; the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program; the Committee on Human Rights; and the Board on Research Data and Information. Prior to the National Academies, she worked with the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative as a program associate and with Bay Management, LLC, as an accounts pay- able associate. Ms. Courembis holds a B.A. in international economics from American University. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Appendix D 287 ELIZABETH GARBEE was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) during the spring of 2018. She currently works as a STEAM program developer and advanced middle school math teacher in a MD private school. She has a Ph.D. in science policy from the Consortium for Science Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University where she studied the value of a STEM Ph.D. outside of academia, and how to support students in whatever career path they choose for themselves. Dr. Garbee earned her bachelor’s degree in astrophysics and classical Greek literature from Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences. FREDRIC LESTINA was a senior program assistant with the Board on Higher Educa- tion and Workforce (BHEW) staff before returning to the Board on Science, Technology, and International Affairs as a research associate. Mr. Lestina was involved with finalizing reports for publication, organizing logistical details for meetings and staff and commit- tee travel, and other administrative duties. Prior to joining the National Academies, he worked as a political transcriptionist, interned as a cartographer, and studied science and development policy. THOMAS RUDIN is the director of the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine—a position he assumed in mid-August 2014. Prior to joining the National Academies, Mr. Rudin served as senior vice president for career readiness and senior vice president for advo- cacy, government relations, and development at the College Board from 2006 to 2014. He was also vice president for government relations from 2004 to 2006 and executive director of grants planning and management from 1996 to 2004 at the College Board. Before joining the College Board, Mr. Rudin was a policy analyst at the National Insti- tutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. In 1991, he taught courses in U.S. public policy, human rights, and organizational management as a visiting instructor at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. In the early 1980s, he directed the work of the Governor’s Task Force on Science and Technology for North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt, Jr., where he was involved in several new state initiatives, such as the North ­ arolina Biotechnology Center and the North Carolina School of Science and C ­ athematics. He received a B.A. from Purdue University, and he holds master’s degrees M in public administration and in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. JOHN VERAS is a senior program assistant with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW). Mr. Veras is originally from Rockland County, New York, and he has lived and worked in Washington, D.C. for the past 5 years. He has worked for a variety of K–12 and higher education organizations in Washington, D.C., including the Association of American Colleges and Universities, the Council of Chief State School Officers, and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Mr. Veras gradu- PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

288 Th e S c i e n c e o f E f f e c t i v e Me n to r sh i p i n ST E M M ated from Princeton University in 2011 with a degree in American history. His senior thesis focused on the history of Latinos in American baseball and how the complexity of race in Latin America has changed baseball historiography. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Mentorship is a catalyst capable of unleashing one’s potential for discovery, curiosity, and participation in STEMM and subsequently improving the training environment in which that STEMM potential is fostered. Mentoring relationships provide developmental spaces in which students’ STEMM skills are honed and pathways into STEMM fields can be discovered. Because mentorship can be so influential in shaping the future STEMM workforce, its occurrence should not be left to chance or idiosyncratic implementation. There is a gap between what we know about effective mentoring and how it is practiced in higher education.

The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM studies mentoring programs and practices at the undergraduate and graduate levels. It explores the importance of mentorship, the science of mentoring relationships, mentorship of underrepresented students in STEMM, mentorship structures and behaviors, and institutional cultures that support mentorship. This report and its complementary interactive guide present insights on effective programs and practices that can be adopted and adapted by institutions, departments, and individual faculty members.

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