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NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
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Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
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Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
×
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
×
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
×
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25569.
×
Page 123

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APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff MARGARET A. HONEY (Chair) is the CEO and president of the New York Hall of Science. Among her current interests at NYSCI is the role of design-based learning in promoting student interest and achievement in STEM subjects. She is widely recognized for her work using digital technologies to support children’s learning across the disciplines of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Prior to joining NYSCI, she spent 15 years as vice president of the Education Development Center (EDC) and director of EDC’s Center for Children and Technology. While at EDC, she was the architect and overseer of numerous large-scale projects funded by organizations including the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Education Sciences, The Carnegie Corporation, The Library of Congress, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Energy. She also co-directed the Northeast and Islands Regional Education Laboratory, which enabled educators, policy-makers, and communities to improve schools by helping them leverage the most current research about learning and K–12 education. Dr. Honey has shared what she’s learned before Congress, state legislatures, and federal panels, and through numerous articles, chapters and books. She formerly served as a board member of the National Academies’ Board on Science Education and currently serves as a member of the Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Her book, Design, Make, Play – Growing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators, explores the potential of these strategies for supporting student engagement and deeper learning. She received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Columbia University. NETA A. BAHCALL is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astrophysics at Princeton University. She is director of the Undergraduate Program in Astrophysics and past director of the Council on Science and Technology of Princeton University. Her work focuses on galaxies, clusters of galaxies, superclusters, and quasars. She combines observational data from large-scale surveys (such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others) and other observations to determine the structure in the universe and its properties and compares it with those expected from cosmological simulations. Along with her colleagues', the determination of properties such as the cluster correlation function, the cluster mass function and its evolution, the mass-to-light function from galaxies to superclusters, the geometrical shape of clusters and of large-scale structure have provided powerful constraints on cosmology including one of the first determinations of the mass-density of the universe and the amplitude of mass-fluctuations. Bahcall works closely with students and postdoctoral fellows; their work is summarized in over 300 scientific publications. She is a member of the NAS. She received her Ph.D. from Tel-Aviv University, working in Nuclear Astrophysics. BRONWYN BEVAN is senior research scientist at the University of Washington. Her research examines how science learning can be organized to empower individuals and communities. She is the principal investigator of the NSF-funded Research + Practice Collaboratory, the One Sky Institute, and several other federally and privately funded projects. For over two decades, she worked at the Exploratorium, in San Francisco, where she led the teaching and learning, and research on learning programs. She served on the National Academies’ Committee on Out-of- School Time STEM Learning and is on the editorial board of the journal Science Education. She App C-1 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

holds her B.A. in History from Barnard College, Columbia University and received her Ph.D. in Urban Education from the City University of New York’s Graduate. JESSICA COVINGTON is a Senior Program Assistant with the Board on Science Education (BOSE) and is currently supporting the committee on Assessing the NASA Science Activation Program, and the Developmental Math proceedings. Along with assisting on BOSE projects, She also maintains the BOSE webpage with all the upcoming events and reports. Before joining the DBASSE team she was the administrative assistant to an architectural and interior design firm here in the DC metro area Stantec. In 2015, she received her B.S. in Psychology from Frostburg State University. KENNE A. DIBNER (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the Board on Science Education. She served as the study director for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s consensus studies Learning Through Citizen Science: Enhancing Opportunities by Design and Science Literacy: Concepts, Contexts, and Consequences, as well as the deputy director for Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Prior to this position, she worked as a research associate at Policy Studies Associates, Inc., where she conducted evaluations of education policies and programs for government agencies, foundations, and school districts, including an evaluation of a partnership with the U.S. Department of Education, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Indian Education to provide citizen science programming to tribal youth. She has also served as a research consultant with the Center on Education Policy and served as a legal intern for the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Education and the Workforce. She has a B.A in English literature from Skidmore College and a Ph.D. in education policy from Michigan State University. WENDY GRAM has worked at the interface of science and education for over 25 years, publishing in both the scientific research and science learning literature. She is passionate about science, data and learning, and committed to engaging diverse audiences in "doing science." As part of the Senior Leadership Team for COMET, a UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) education and training program, she leads program management, a team of scientists and instructional designers, and supports business development and proposal management. Prior to joining COMET, she was the lead for Science Engagement and Education for the NSF-funded National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) for ten years. Dr. Gram led development, implementation, and evaluation of education and engagement programs and tools to enable the scientific community to effectively discover, access and use NEON data and resources. As director of Science and Education at NEON, she also led a team of 60 scientists, technicians, educators, graphic designers, and outreach specialists that executed NEON Science and Engagement activities. Before joining NEON in 2008, she spent nine years as head of education at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma. There, she was a member of the Senior Leadership Team for the museum and led programs that integrated science with educational programming, such as innovative teacher professional development workshops, field courses, K–12 classes, and exhibit development. She holds a B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from the University of Missouri. App C-2 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

ROGERS HALL is Wachtmeister Professor of Mathematics Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning, Vanderbilt University. His research concerns learning and teaching in STEM conceptual practices, comparative studies of embodied action in these practices, and the organization and development of representational practices more generally. Before joining the Vanderbilt faculty, where he served as chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning between 2011 and 2017, he taught for ten years at UC Berkeley. Dr. Hall is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and has been a residential fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University, 2007-2008), the UC Humanities Research Institute (2001), and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (1999). He has also been a NAE/Spencer Foundation and McDonnell foundation postdoctoral fellow (1996- 1997). Dr. Hall completed his Ph.D. in Information and computer science at the University of California, Irvine. ABIGAIL JURIST LEVY is the co-director of Education Development Corporation’s (EDC) STEM portfolio and a science researcher whose work seeks to understand the conditions, policies, and programs that enable STEM teachers to do their best work preparing all students for continued STEM learning and careers. Her work often focuses on the costs and cost- effectiveness of programs and policies relating to science teaching, and she has contributed to the knowledge base about teacher turnover and its cost, the professional development of science teachers, and the impact of an inquiry-based approach to science teaching. During her tenure at EDC, she has studied science fair participation and impact, the cost and cost-effectiveness of different models of elementary science instruction, and how teachers adapt to large-scale curriculum reform. She is a widely published author and has managed several multi-year research and evaluation studies funded by the National Science Foundation. She holds a Ph.D. in family and children policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University. CATHRYN A. MANDUCA has nearly two decades of experience leading national programs to improve geoscience education and undergraduate STEM education. She is the Director of the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College and the Executive Director of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers. This work supports communities of educators in learning together and collaborating to create resources supporting widespread improvement. The 30,000+ pages comprising the SERC websites are visited by more than 5 million visitors per year. Her research focuses on understanding faculty learning and the impact of professional networks on educational practice. She serves on the Board on Science Education and the LabX Advisory Board for the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and has served on the elected leadership for the American Geophysical Union and AAAS Education Section in the past. She is a fellow of the AAAS and Geological Society of America, and past recipient of the American Geophysical Union award for Excellence in Earth and Space Education. She received her B.A. in Geology from Williams College and her Ph.D. in Geology from the California Institute of Technology. RAFI SANTO is a learning scientist focused on the intersection of technology, education, equity, and institutional change. He is the principal researcher at Telos Learning and a research associate at CSforALL. Centering his work within research-practice partnerships, he has studied, App C-3 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

collaborated with, and facilitated a range of organizational networks related to digital learning and computing education. Within informal education, he has focused on design of innovation networks, working with both regional networks including the Mozilla Hive NYC Learning Network, a collective of 70 informal education organizations, as well as national networks, including the Digital Learning Challenge community supported by the Susan Crown Exchange. His K–12 work with CSforALL looks at how school districts develop equitable, values-driven computer science initiatives. His research on Hacker Literacies has appeared in journals including International Journal of Learning and Media and Digital Culture & Education, and he is co-author of a four volume collection on digital making from MIT Press called Interconnections: Understanding Systems through Digital Design. His scholarship spans multiple levels of activity—from understanding youth trajectories across multiple settings to investigating policy implementation and organizational design—in order to develop practical insights that come from a holistic perspective. He’s received support from the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, the Susan Crown Exchange and Google. He received his B.A from New York University and his Ph.D. in learning sciences from Indiana University. DENNIS SCHATZ is senior advisor at Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington, and also Senior Fellow at the Institute for Learning Innovation. He was the inaugural Field Editor of Connected Science Learning, a journal which lighlights links between in-school and out-of- school learning. The journal is a joint effort of NSTA (National Science Teachers Association) and ASTC (Association of Science-Technology Centers). He was recently elected to be president of NSTA, which involves a three-year commitment—President-elect in 2018-19; president in 2019-20, retiring president in 2020-21. In addition, he is on the board of BSCS Science Learning and a technical advisor to the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC). A research solar astronomer prior to his career in science education, he worked at the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley, prior to moving to Seattle in 1977. At Pacific Science Center he has held a broad range of positions from director of the astronomy education in his early years to VP for exhibits and VP for education to Senior VP in more recent years. Over his years at Pacific Science Center, he served as principal investigator for a number of National Science Foundation (NSF) projects, including the Science Center's innovative Community Leadership project that develops science advocates in community-based organizations, and the nationally touring exhibit, Aliens: Worlds of Possibilities, which explores the nature of the solar system and the search for extraterrestrial life in the galaxy. He was the founding director of Portal to the Public, a nationwide effort to assist science-based professionals to effectively engage with public audiences. He earned a B.S. degree in physics and astronomy from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a M.S. degree in astronomy from the University of California, Berkeley. HEIDI SCHWEINGRUBER (Board Director) is the director of the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director or co-study director for a wide range of studies, including those on revising national standards for K–12 science education, learning and teaching science in grades K–8, and mathematics learning in early childhood. She also coauthored two award-winning books for practitioners that translate findings of Academies’ reports for a broader audience, on using App C-4 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

research in K–8 science classrooms and on information science education. Prior to joining the Academies, she worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. She also previously served on the faculty of Rice University and as the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project, an outreach program in K–12 mathematics education. She has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan. MARK SHOWALTER is a senior research scientist and fellow at the SETI Institute. His research focuses on the dynamics of rings and small moons in the Solar System. Known for his persistence in planetary image analysis, Mark's early work with Voyager data led to the discoveries of Jupiter's faint, outer "gossamer" rings and Saturn's tiny ring-moon, Pan. Starting in 2003, his work with the Hubble Space Telescope led to the discoveries of "Mab" and "Cupid", small moons of Uranus now named after characters from Shakespeare's plays. His work also revealed two faint outer rings of dust encircling the planet. In 2011, he initiated a Hubble observing program focused on Pluto, which led to the discoveries of two tiny moons. Their names, "Kerberos" and "Styx", were selected through an international naming campaign. Mark also discovered the 14th known moon of Neptune, Hippocamp. He is a co-investigator on NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn and its New Horizons mission to Pluto and beyond. In addition to his research, Mark manages the Ring-Moon Systems Node of NASA's Planetary Data System. The site provides public access to images and other data from NASA's Voyager, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons missions, from the Hubble Space Telescope, and from a variety of Earth-based telescopes. He received his Ph.D. in Astronomy from Cornell University. SUSAN SULLIVAN is the director of diversity and inclusion for Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and focused on bringing awareness to the need for science to serve society, to attract diverse talent, and to develop a culture where all involved can thrive. Her formal training is in atmospheric chemistry, while her primary foci as an educator has been in climate change and climate communications. She was previously the president of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers(NAGT) and has served as PI for multiple NASA grants and has been the education lead for two mission-based project teams in Earth and in space science. Through her work with NAGT, she has helped build the capacity for the Next Generation Science Standards along with her work through the Digital Library for Earth Systems Education. She received her B.S. in chemistry from California Polytechnic State University and her Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from University of Colorado, Boulder. TIFFANY E. TAYLOR is currently an Associate Program Officer for the Board on Science Education (BOSE) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In this role, she provides research and planning support for several ongoing projects including the Roundtable on Systemic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education, an expert study to assess the NASA Science Activation Program, and a consensus study on Minority Serving Institutions: America’s Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM workforce, in collaboration with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce. She is currently the study director for the Workshop on the Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics, which brought together a variety of stakeholders who have developed and/or implemented new initiatives to improve the mathematics education experience for all students. Taylor came to the App C-5 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

National Academies as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow in 2017, where she also worked with the Board on Science Education. She received her bachelor’s degree in Biology from Howard University and her Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). She is extremely passionate about the inclusion of persons of diverse backgrounds, in science, and aspires to leverage her Ph.D. training and science policy experience to address education equity within society, in both domestic and global settings. BRYAN KENT WALLACE serves as a physics faculty member and is the director of Physics Laboratories at Fisk University. In that capacity, he assumed responsibility for the modernization and instruction in all physics undergraduate laboratories, as well as, laboratory curriculum. Under his supervision, the Physics laboratories have advanced from partial to full computerization of data collection, and received numerous improvements by way of renovation, organization, and utilization of more efficient equipment. He is currently primary investigator for Fisk University’s Rocket Science Program, entitled Altitude Achievement Missile Team (F.A.A.M.T). This program was built from scratch to compete in a NASA competition known as University Student Launch Initiative, wherein the students design, build, launch and recover a sounding rocket carrying a scientific payload, which must achieve an altitude of exactly one mile. Wallace studies effective mentorship models for university students in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers as well as engaging in mentoring programs aimed at building self-efficacy in under-represented populations in K–12. The goal of these efforts is to encouraging them to become full participants in their STEM curriculum and eventually go into STEM related careers. He holds an Ed.D. in learning organizations and strategic change. MING-YING WEI retired in 2016 from NASA Headquarters after serving more than 20 years as a program manager in the Earth Science Division of the Science Mission Directorate. Her portfolio included supporting graduate and early-career research in Earth system science with emphasis on the utilization of space-borne observations and resources, as well as promoting the teaching, learning, and public understanding of Earth and environmental sciences. She has conducted research at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and served as a rotator in the Atmospheric Sciences Division at the NSF. Wei received her Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma. JULIE YU is a Senior Scientist at the Exploratorium, San Francisco's museum of science, art, and human perception. She provides science content support throughout the museum and works with teachers to bring inquiry-based science learning to their classrooms as part of the Exploratorium’s Teacher Institute, a nationally-recognized teacher professional learning center. With a broad interest in all sciences, her work and research have spanned from viruses and stem cells to teacher learning and inquiry to concrete and cement. This has led to a myriad of opportunities, including teaching science to Tibetan monks and nuns, launching an explosion of 2000 ping pong balls, and acquiring a US patent. Yu holds a BS in chemical engineering from Brown University and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering with a minor in molecular and cell biology from the University of California, Berkeley. App C-6 PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS

NASA's Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities Get This Book
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The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is one of the United States’ leading federal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) agencies and plays an important role in the landscape of STEM education. In 2015, NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD) created the Science Activation (SciAct) program to increase the overall coherence of SMD’s education efforts, to support more effective, sustainable, and efficient use of SMD science discoveries for education, and to enable NASA scientists and engineers to engage more effectively and efficiently in the STEM learning environment with learners of all ages. SciAct is now transitioning into its second round of funding, and it is beneficial to review the program’s portfolio and identify opportunities for improvement.

NASA’s Science Activation Program: Achievements and Opportunities

assesses SciAct’s efforts towards meeting its goals. The key objectives of SciAct are to enable STEM education, improve U.S. scientific literacy, advance national education goals, and leverage efforts through partnerships. This report describes and assesses the history, current status, and vision of the program and its projects. It also provides recommendations to enhance NASA’s efforts through the SciAct program.

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