National Academies Press: OpenBook

Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study (2019)

Chapter: Rider Experience

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Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Rider Experience." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
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Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Rider Experience." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
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Page 44

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

43 RIDER EXPERIENCE Placemaking Tool Beautification (planters and trash cans) Parklets Public Art Seating Shade Signage Street Art *Better Bus Coalition *BostonBRT Go Ave 26 King Street Transit Pilot *MARTA Army Solano Avenue Bus Parklet *TURBO Nashville Meet me at the bus stop! Beyond dedicated lanes, Transit Signal Prioritization, queue jump lanes, and platform-level boarding, there are tactical strategies cities and other entities have used to bring bus transit to the front of people’s minds and political agendas. When cities struggle to maintain bus ridership, creating a sense of place and community around using the bus and making the experience more enjoyable can help to accomplish parallel goals and make a statement about investment in the transit system. Projects from Figure 1 as well as advocacy groups and funding programs included in the Spotlight chapter, are included in Figure 9 to provide a broad spectrum of transit placemaking examples. Where some projects had placemaking components as part of a larger project or initiative (as was the case in Toronto and in the Barr Foundation’s BostonBRT program), a few projects or groups made placemaking the core project element. The Solano Avenue Bus Parklet and Go Ave 26 had elements of access, with elevated boarding and wayfinding, but were also designed to be beautiful and comfortable and to create a cohesive aesthetic throughout each intervention. In Toronto, the public space component of the King Street Transit Pilot enabled more community input and participation through the design competition put on by the city. Similarly, the Barr Foundation provided support to its funding awardees by using local artists to dress up bus shelters and by creating fun signage with unique BostonBRT branding to enliven the experience of waiting for the bus. For the Better Bus Coalition, MARTA Army, and TURBO, placemaking and the sprucing up of bus stops did not have to come at a substantial cost. Using donations and small grants, these groups made large statements using just wood and screws and have built on these projects to accomplish larger goals for their transit networks. *Indicates either an advocacy group or funding program featured in the Spotlight section. Skip to page 113 to learn more. Figure 9, Rider Experience Table.

Figure 10, Ridership Experience Project Highlights. 44 THE NUMBERS 48 New public spaces created in the right-of-way on King Street. Project team lead entity: 0 2 1 Project community size: TRANSIT AGENCY CITY DEPARTMENT(S) OTHER Los Angeles: 4 million x 143 Albany: 19,688 3 Number of initiatives that resulted in a new permit process or design guide. 6 Different types of installations were a part of Go Ave 26. 1 Avg. number of years from project conception to implementation. 80 Trash cans placed at bus stops in East Point, GA. MARTA ARMY ADOPT-A-STOP LOWEST-COST PROJECT:

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As transit agencies, local governments, and citizens look for ways to improve existing, and start new, transit service, many of them are turning to the Quick-Build (Tactical Urbanism) methodology. This approach uses inexpensive, temporary materials and short-term tactics as a way of implementing projects in the short-term, while longer-term planning takes place.

The TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program's TCRP Research Report 207: Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study documents the current state of the practice with regard to what are called Tactical Transit projects, specifically for surface transit (bus and streetcar). These are both physical and operational strategies that improve the delivery of surface transit projects using this methodology. Tactical Transit projects, operational and physical Quick-Build projects that uniquely focus on transit, have evolved as a way for municipal governments to improve the way they respond to rider needs and increased demand for service.

The report highlights Tactical Transit projects happening in cities across North America and how transit agencies and other entities are using innovative methods to improve transit speed, access, and ridership at a fraction of both the cost and time of conventional projects.

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