National Academies Press: OpenBook

Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study (2019)

Chapter: Spotlight: Advocacy + Funding

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Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Spotlight: Advocacy + Funding." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
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Page 113
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Spotlight: Advocacy + Funding." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
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Page 114

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

SPOTLIGHT: FUNDING PROGRAMS 123 SPOTLIGHT: ADVOCACY 115 SPOTLIGHT: ADVOCACY + FUNDING

The entities and programs highlighted in this chapter were discovered through investigation into Quick-Build projects to be featured in this report. The advocacy groups in this chapter have all implemented their own small-scale Quick-Build projects, but the research team found the story of how these groups came about, their relationships with their local governments, and how they mobilize their communities to join them in action more robust than the story of their individual projects. One of the groups highlighted, the Better Bus Coalition from Cincinnati, Ohio, played a pivotal role in the implementation of the Main Street Bus Lane, one of the report’s 20 featured projects. The other groups (MARTA Army and TURBO Nashville), through initiating their own Quick-Build projects, have formed invaluable relationships with their transit agencies and city governments that are advancing both transit improvement projects and the practice of Quick-Build methodology. The funding programs highlighted here were also discovered either as a result of being related to one of the projects in the project list or because of the use of Quick-Build methodology in the formation and execution of their duties. The BostonBRT program provided funding and marketing assistance to four projects in the project list. The ETC Pilot Program is a test in itself; it applies a new partnership between a transit agency and metro government to address the low-hanging fruit of regional transit improvements. In profiling these entities and programs, the research team hopes to communicate not just additional Quick-Build projects, but also the different ways the methodology can be used to accomplish a variety of goals—and broader ones. ADVOCACY: Better Bus Coalition, MARTA Army, and TURBO Nashville are groups that were formed by community members with a desire to improve their transit and built environments and that have made long- lasting impressions on their cities and local governments through new processes or infrastructure, or both. FUNDING PROGRAMS: BostonBRT and the ETC Pilot Program are programs or collaborations that identified a need for transit improvements in their regions and, through funding, technical assistance, and/or communications resources are helping cities and regions put paper to pavement. 114

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As transit agencies, local governments, and citizens look for ways to improve existing, and start new, transit service, many of them are turning to the Quick-Build (Tactical Urbanism) methodology. This approach uses inexpensive, temporary materials and short-term tactics as a way of implementing projects in the short-term, while longer-term planning takes place.

The TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program's TCRP Research Report 207: Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study documents the current state of the practice with regard to what are called Tactical Transit projects, specifically for surface transit (bus and streetcar). These are both physical and operational strategies that improve the delivery of surface transit projects using this methodology. Tactical Transit projects, operational and physical Quick-Build projects that uniquely focus on transit, have evolved as a way for municipal governments to improve the way they respond to rider needs and increased demand for service.

The report highlights Tactical Transit projects happening in cities across North America and how transit agencies and other entities are using innovative methods to improve transit speed, access, and ridership at a fraction of both the cost and time of conventional projects.

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