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Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study (2019)

Chapter: Project List and Map

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Page 19
Suggested Citation:"Project List and Map." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
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Page 19
Page 20
Suggested Citation:"Project List and Map." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
×
Page 20
Page 21
Suggested Citation:"Project List and Map." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
×
Page 21
Page 22
Suggested Citation:"Project List and Map." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25571.
×
Page 22

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PROJECT LIST + MAP

Project Name Project Type | Main Elements Project Scale Location Project Team 5L Fulton Limited Pilot Multi-Part Pilot Project | limited-stop service, stop consolidation and relocation, road diet, bus zone optimization, parking re-configuration, signage 5 miles San Francisco, CA San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) Bancroft West Pilot Project Dedicated Bus Lane | two-way protected bike lane, signage .25 miles Berkeley, CA City of Berkeley, Alameda-Contra Costa (AC) Transit, Bike East Bay Broadway Bus Lane Shared Bus-Bike Lane | boarding platforms, Transit Signal Priority (TSP) 1 mile Everett, MA City of Everett, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) CTA Prepaid Bus Boarding Prepaid Boarding Pilots Four locations at bus stations/stops through- out the city Chicago, IL Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) Denver Moves Broadway/Lincoln Transit Improvements Multi-Part Pilot Project | peak to 24-hour existing bus lane transition, bus lane extension, addition of red paint, stop consolidation, service changes, signage 3.5-miles Denver, CO City of Denver, Regional Transportation District (RTD) Go Ave 26 Multi-Part Pilot Project | wayfinding, signage, public art, public space enhancements .25 miles Los Angeles, CA LA Más Hands on Exchange Protected Bike Lane | bus stop enhancements .75 miles Akron, OH Street Plans, University of Akron, City of Akron Hennepin Avenue Bus Lanes Dedicated Bus Lanes | signage .55 miles Minneapolis, MN Metro Transit, City of Minneapolis Figure 1, Project List Note: Where the project teams had preferred project names, or where there was an official, existing name for the project, the research team did not deviate from this name. Otherwise, projects were named according to city (if multiple locations of interventions)/corridor and infrastructure type. The first listed entity in the far right column is the lead entity. Indicates a Superlative. Skip to pg. 45 to learn which projects the research team found particularly noteworthy. 14

Project Name Project Type | Main Elements Project Scale Location Project Team King Street Transit Pilot Multi-Part Pilot Project | Motor vehicle access restriction, stop relocation and enhancements, signal adjustments, signage, public realm installations 1.6-mile segment Toronto, CAN City of Toronto, Toronto Transit Commission Los Angeles Bus Boarding Platforms Bus Boarding Platforms Multiple platforms throughout the city Los Angeles, CA City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation (DOT) Main Street Bus Lane Dedicated Bus Lane | signage .42 miles Cincinnati, OH City of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Metro, Better Bus Coalition Massachusetts Avenue Bus Lane Shared Bus-Bike Lane | queue jump lanes, stop relocation, signage, TSP .25 miles Arlington, MA Town of Arlington, City of Cambridge, MA Dept. of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), MBTA Mt. Auburn Street Bus Lanes Shared Bus-Bike Lanes | TSP, queue jump lanes, painted curb extensions, signage, conventional bike lane .90 miles Cambridge & Watertown, MA City of Cambridge, Town of Watertown, MA Dept. of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), MBTA New York City Bus Boarding Platforms Bus Boarding Platforms Multiple platforms throughout the city New York, NY City of New York City Nolensville Crossing Treatment Midblock Crossing | refuge islands, signage Single crossing across a 5-lane state road Nashville, TN TDOT, Metro Public Works, Walk Bike Nashville Oakland Bus Boarding Platforms Bus Boarding Platforms Four platforms within three blocks stretch Oakland, CA City of Oakland Rhode Island Avenue Bus Lane Dedicated Bus Lane | signage 1.1 miles Washington, D.C. District of Columbia, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Solano Avenue Bus Parklet Bus Parklet N/A Albany, CA City of Albany, AC Transit, business owners Streets for People Dedicated Bus Lane | buffered bike lane, signal adjustments, signage .63 miles Miami, FL Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA), Miami-Dade County, City of Miami Washington Street Bus Lane Shared Bus-Bike Lane | signage 1.22 miles Boston, MA City of Boston, MBTA Figure 1, Project List. 15 Note: Refer to the Terms Sheet on pg. 129 for how the research team is defining and referring to the Tactical Transit projects and transit tools in the report.

4 2 1 4 “No studying. The pilot is the study.” Founder, Better Bus Coalition Figure 2, Project Map. Note: Dots with numbers indicate multiple projects in either the same city or metro region. 16

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As transit agencies, local governments, and citizens look for ways to improve existing, and start new, transit service, many of them are turning to the Quick-Build (Tactical Urbanism) methodology. This approach uses inexpensive, temporary materials and short-term tactics as a way of implementing projects in the short-term, while longer-term planning takes place.

The pre-publication draft of Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Research Report 207: Fast-Tracked: A Tactical Transit Study documents the current state of the practice with regard to what are called Tactical Transit projects, specifically for surface transit (bus and streetcar). These are both physical and operational strategies that improve the delivery of surface transit projects using this methodology. Tactical Transit projects, operational and physical Quick-Build projects that uniquely focus on transit, have evolved as a way for municipal governments to improve the way they respond to rider needs and increased demand for service.

The report highlights Tactical Transit projects happening in cities across North America and how transit agencies and other entities are using innovative methods to improve transit speed, access, and ridership at a fraction of both the cost and time of conventional projects.

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