National Academies Press: OpenBook

Emergency Working Groups at Airports (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B - Interview Script

« Previous: Appendix A - Airports and Others Interviewed
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Interview Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 39
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Interview Script." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 40

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

39 Interview Script A P P E N D I X B Have you considered an emergency working group (EWG) for your airport? For what need or purpose? (Catalyst for EWG formation, types of emergencies envisioned) Aircraft incidents/victim support tasks All hazards Diversions Others Have you explored the need or purpose? Gap analysis? What sort of outreach or promotion would be most effective to make all airports and airlines aware of the existence and functions of an EWG? How do you become aware of an inbound diversion? If you decided yes: What steps have you taken? Formal or informal organization? Membership and partners, organizational structure Is your EWG written into your AEP? Your ASP? How do you educate your airlines that they can ask other airlines for help? (Training objectives and agendas) EWG communications—types, frequencies, and who initiates? Does it meet regularly? (Meeting frequency, purpose, and structure) All airlines or just a subset (e.g., international carriers) Leader: airport or airline? Are any local, state, or federal agencies members of the EWG? What sorts of prior agreements do you have with outside agencies (local, county, state, federal, American Red Cross, other)? Are your FBOs involved in the EWG? Does your plan include any type of family assistance services? How do you identify roles and specialized skills of EWG member personnel?

40 Emergency Working Groups at Airports How do you avoid/control self-deployment? How does your EWG fit into or work with your ICS structure during a response? Inhibitors or roadblocks encountered in getting EWG up and running Issues or problems? (Lessons learned, challenges and work-arounds, gaps and further research needs) Liability Reimbursement Other issues Benefits If you decided no: Why? How do you handle diversions for airlines not at your airport? Do you have another mechanism (e.g., common use)? Is there anything else you want to say? Do you have special badges or processes to allow EWG to respond to incident site? Do you have written guidance? (Planning documents, practices, and strategies) What do you have? What materials are you willing to share? Do you have a special EWG training program? (Format for EWG participation in exercises) Has your EWG ever been activated? How or who can activate the EWG?

Next: Appendix C - NTSB Family Assistance Operations Workshop Agendas »
Emergency Working Groups at Airports Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Airports—especially in the past two decades—have generally sought to promote and increase collaboration among the members of the airport community, particularly between an airport and its airlines. One metric of this trend has been the increase in the number of U.S. airports with full-time emergency managers, from fewer than 10 in 2007 to more than 120 today. Collaboration and increased professionalism in airport emergency management have gone hand in hand.

No matter whether the incident is aircraft-related or an incident in the terminal—such as an active shooter, a bomb threat, or other hazard—the goals of airports, airlines, and others in the airport community are to achieve safety, security, compassion, customer service, regulatory compliance, and reputation. Achieving these goals can contribute to resiliency and to the protection of critical infrastructure and key resources.

Although air travel is one of the safest modes of travel, and airports are among the safest public spaces in the United States, air-travel incidents do occur. ACRP Synthesis 99: Emergency Working Groups at Airports documents these working groups and how they assist victims and their families and friends in the weeks following an incident.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!