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Emergency Working Groups at Airports (2019)

Chapter: Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX

« Previous: Appendix D - Sea-Tac s EWG Brochure
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
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Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 51
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 52
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 53
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 54
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E - Champion s Pitch at LAX." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Emergency Working Groups at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25572.
×
Page 55

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50 Champion’s Pitch at LAX A P P E N D I X E LAX Emergency Working Group (EWG) Task Force Training Workshop

Champion’s Pitch at LAX 51 Mission Statement • By using my personal power I will respectfully provide assistance in a time of crisis to support my fellow airline as needed • I will achieve this through open communications, compassion, empathy and follow through for those affected without judgement Agenda 1. The WHY 2. The WHO 3. The WHAT 4. The HOW 5. Forms/Feelings/Follow Thru 6. The MEDIA 7. Next Steps 8. Questions & Answers THE WHY! In a time of crisis history has shown that many hands, hearts and heads are needed to succeed in delivery of basic services to those in need.

52 Emergency Working Groups at Airports Airlines are now mandated under many countries’ laws to provide services in a time of an incident and these are quite specific in terms of delivery. While we all have large “partners” who will help us in a time of need the Virgin Brand’s here at LAX felt that we should look outside the box and develop a network of support with generic roles to be manned: By having a small trained dedicated support team, the affected airline will be able to deliver on the requirements, with the knowledge that they have a skilled support team on site in addition of their own staff. This support team will fill support roles for the affected airline - upon request - until such time that Go Teams arrive. THE WHO! The vision for the support task force is, that each airline trains about 6 to 8 key players for the EWG task force. It is envisioned that these key players are from the Management, Supervisors or trained emergency response staff members of each airline. If 10 airlines participate within this task force and there is an opportunity to deploy 3 staff from each airline right away to support an affected airline. This would then give the affected airline 30 additional staff. Of course this will need to be flexible on the day and it might be that one airline can only supply one staff member, but another airline can supply 5. In the long run it will be the airline that is affected that will determine how many they need and when. By keeping a trained pool of staff, each airline will have a more controlled environment to ensure delivery of the correct protocols. THE WHAT! So what is it that we are looking to provide as support in a crisis to our fellow airline? a) Scribes – (Handout) b) Runners – (Handout) c) Welfare Overseers/Data collectors for Passenger/Family/Crew Reception Centers and Reunion Center – (Handout)

Champion’s Pitch at LAX 53 d) Phone Duty – (Handout) e) Hospital Liaison – (Handout) THE HOW! So HOW are we going to make this happen? 1. Call out notification – Handout 2. Meeting Place – Virgin Australia T3 or TBITEC Room C (if VA issue) 3. Assignment Location 4. Tools needed and location CORE GROUP RESPONSIBILITY: 1. Other agency support 2. Management of the task group and training FORMS/FEELINGS/ FOLLOW THRU 1. Review of generic forms – Handouts

54 Emergency Working Groups at Airports 2. How do you take care of yourself? – Discussion on support for support staff and where they seek help – VA EAP is available to all support staff 3. Follow thru on what might have been advised to a family member(s) or passenger who have requested a specific service THE MEDIA Each airline has about the same policy for Media in that we just do not comment. Ensure prior to leaving for your assignment area you have all the contacts, web site addresses, location of the Media room and 800 numbers to provide Media for the most current information. We do not want to “brush” off the Media so the standard phrase best to use is as follows: “I am sorry, I understand your concern. I do not have information about the situation. Please contact the Corporate Communications team on (Phone, web site, 800 number).” or “My priority right now is to respond to the needs of passengers and their families. For the latest confirmed information please contact the Corporate Communications team on (phone, web site, 800 number).” NEXT STEPS 1. Agree to be a member of the support team 2. Provide contact details to include e-mail addresses for communications 3. Attend refresher training for 1 hour once per year

Champion’s Pitch at LAX 55 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Next: Appendix F - LAX EWG Handbook »
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Airports—especially in the past two decades—have generally sought to promote and increase collaboration among the members of the airport community, particularly between an airport and its airlines. One metric of this trend has been the increase in the number of U.S. airports with full-time emergency managers, from fewer than 10 in 2007 to more than 120 today. Collaboration and increased professionalism in airport emergency management have gone hand in hand.

No matter whether the incident is aircraft-related or an incident in the terminal—such as an active shooter, a bomb threat, or other hazard—the goals of airports, airlines, and others in the airport community are to achieve safety, security, compassion, customer service, regulatory compliance, and reputation. Achieving these goals can contribute to resiliency and to the protection of critical infrastructure and key resources.

Although air travel is one of the safest modes of travel, and airports are among the safest public spaces in the United States, air-travel incidents do occur. ACRP Synthesis 99: Emergency Working Groups at Airports documents these working groups and how they assist victims and their families and friends in the weeks following an incident.

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