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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25592.
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Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25592.
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Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25592.
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Page 161

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Appendix B Public Meeting Agendas These in-person public meetings held by the committee served as information-gathering sessions. They are listed in chronological order. The locations of in-person meetings are provided. Presentations that were made via the Internet at the in-person public meetings are noted. MEETING 1 National Academy of Sciences – Keck Center, Room 209 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC December 6–7, 2018 DECEMBER 6, 2018 3:15 Welcome and Introductions—Jim Collins and Shirley Pomponi, Committee Co-Chairs 3:30 Sponsors’ Perspectives on the Context and Expectations for the Study—Muriel Poston and Roland Roberts, National Science Foundation 4:30 Public Comments—Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration. Advanced sign-up is required. 4:45 Adjourn open session. DECEMBER 7, 2018 8:15 Welcome and Introductions—Jim Collins and Shirley Pomponi, Committee Co-Chairs 8:25 Broad Considerations for the Study Outcomes Futureproofing Natural History Collections—Elizabeth Merritt, Vice President of Strategic Foresight and Founding Director, Center for the Future of Museums Perspective on Sustaining Living Microbial Germplasm Repositories—Kevin McCluskey, Research Professor and Curator, Fungal Genetics Stock Center, Kansas State University (by videoconference) 9:15 Adjourn open session. MEETING 2 National Academy of Sciences, Room 120 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC February 7–8, 2019 FEBRUARY 7, 2019 1:30 Welcome and Introductions—Jim Collins and Shirley Pomponi, Committee Co-Chairs Prepublication Copy 159

Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century 1:35 History of Natural History Collections in the United States—Pamela M. Henson, Smithsonian Institution 2:00 An Overview on the Interagency Working Group on Scientific Collections—Scott E. Miller, Smithsonian Institution 2:25 Key Components of Sustainable Mission and Infrastructure for a Biological Collection—Sarah B. George, Natural History Museum of Utah 2:50 Panel Discussion with Dr. Henson, Dr. Miller, and Dr. George 3:10 Break 3:25 Leveraging Collections to Advance STEM Education—Jay Labov, Senior Advisor for Education and Communication, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (Retired) 3:45 Question and Answer Session with Jay Labov 3:55 Biological Collections for Understanding Biodiversity in the Anthropocene—Emily K. Meineke, Harvard University Herbaria 4:15 Leveraging Collections to Assess Global Status of Pollinators—Ignasi Bartomeus, Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC (by videoconference) 4:35 Panel Discussion with Dr. Meineke and Dr. Bartomeus 4:50 Public Comments—Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration. Advanced sign-up is required. 5:00 Adjourn open session. FEBRUARY 8, 2019 8:30 Welcome and Opening Remarks 8:35 Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (GCM): The Global Cooperation Network for Culture Collections Worldwide—Juncai Ma, Chinese Academy of Sciences (by videoconference) 8:55 Question and Answer Session with Juncai Ma 9:10 The Effect of the Nagoya Protocol on Biological Collections—Breda M. Zimkus, Harvard University 9:30 Panel Discussion with Breda M. Zimkus and Dr. Ma 9:45 Public Comments—Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration. Advanced sign-up is required. 9:50 Adjourn open session. 160 Prepublication Copy

Appendix B MEETING 3 Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Huntington and Board Rooms 100 Academy Way Irvine, CA 92617 April 23–24, 2019 APRIL 23, 2019 9:00 Updates on Federal and National Efforts: Biocollections and Biosecurity—Diane DiEuliis, Senior Research Fellow, National Defense University (by videoconference) 10:00 Committee Discussion 4:15 Welcome and Introductions—Jim Collins and Shirley Pomponi, Committee Co-Chairs 4:20 Data Integration and Attribution—Donald Hobern, Executive Secretary, International Barcode for Life Consortium (by videoconference) 5:00 Adjourn open session. APRIL 24, 2019 9:00 Welcome and Introductions—Jim Collins and Shirley Pomponi, Committee Co-Chairs 9:10 Perspective on the BLUE Data Initiative and the Contribution of Small Collections—Anna Monfils, Director, CMU Herbarium, Central Michigan University 9:30 Arthropod Holdings and Digitization Efforts for North America with a Focus on the United States: Meeting National to Global Needs for Biodiversity Data—Neil Cobb, Director, Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University (by videoconference) 9:50 Questions and Answer Session with Dr. Monfils and Dr. Cobb 10:15 Long-term Success and Challenges in Establishing and Sustaining University Museum Biological Collections—Michael Nachman, Director, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley (by videoconference) 10:35 Questions and Answer Session with Dr. Nachman 10:50 Long-term Success and Challenges in Establishing and Sustaining a Botanical Garden and a Seed Bank Promoting Research, Conservation, and Education—Lucinda McDade, Director of Research, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden 11:10 Agricultural Genebanks: Management, Use, and Challenges—Stephanie Greene, Supervisory Plant Physiologist, Department of Agriculture National Laboratory for Genetic Resource Preservation, Fort Collins (by videoconference) 11:30 Questions and Answer Session with Dr. McDade and Dr. Greene 11:45 Public Comments—Members of the public are invited to share evidence and views they would like for the committee to take into consideration. Advanced sign-up is required. 12:00 Adjourn open session. Lunch with speakers. Prepublication Copy 161

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Biological collections are a critical part of the nation's science and innovation infrastructure and a fundamental resource for understanding the natural world. Biological collections underpin basic science discoveries as well as deepen our understanding of many challenges such as global change, biodiversity loss, sustainable food production, ecosystem conservation, and improving human health and security. They are important resources for education, both in formal training for the science and technology workforce, and in informal learning through schools, citizen science programs, and adult learning. However, the sustainability of biological collections is under threat. Without enhanced strategic leadership and investments in their infrastructure and growth many biological collections could be lost.

Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century recommends approaches for biological collections to develop long-term financial sustainability, advance digitization, recruit and support a diverse workforce, and upgrade and maintain a robust physical infrastructure in order to continue serving science and society. The aim of the report is to stimulate a national discussion regarding the goals and strategies needed to ensure that U.S. biological collections not only thrive but continue to grow throughout the 21st century and beyond.

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