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Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering (2019)

Chapter: Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information

« Previous: Appendix A: Invited Speakers and Presenters at Committee Meetings
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25601.
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Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25601.
×
Page 68
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25601.
×
Page 69
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25601.
×
Page 70
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Study Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25601.
×
Page 71

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PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 67 Appendix B Study Committee Member Biographical Information Heidi C. Perry, Chair, is currently Principal Staff for the Division Office for Air, Missile & Maritime Defense Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory. In her role, she works strategic initiatives for undersea systems, and serves as the chief innovation officer for the division. Previously, Ms. Perry was Director, System Engineering, at the Charles S. Draper Laboratory, Incorporated. She also served in other senior leadership roles, including Director, Algorithms & Software and Director, Internal R&D Portfolio. Her expertise includes guidance, navigation, and control; global position system anti-jam and ground control; autonomous systems; mission-critical software; and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems. Ms. Perry began her career with General Electric as a systems engineer working on the AN/BSY-2 Sonar System before moving to IBM, as a systems engineer for avionics design and flight test programs. From IBM she moved to Draper Laboratory as task leader for the Dolphin Navigation System Upgrade and remained with Draper for over 20 years. In these years at the laboratory, she served as technical director for various research and development programs involving autonomous spacecraft, aircraft, robotics systems, and underwater vehicles. A member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), she was named AIAA Software Engineer of the Year 2004—New England Sector. A former member of the Naval Studies Board (2008-2013), she also served on the National Academies’ Committee on Capability Surprise for U.S. Naval Forces, Committee on National Security Implications of Climate Change on U.S. Naval Forces, and Committee on the “1,000 Ship Navy”—A Distributed and Global Maritime Network. Most recently, she served as the co-chair of the National Academies’ Committee on Mainstreaming Unmanned Undersea Vehicles into Future U.S. Naval Operations. She received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University and an M.S. in computer engineering from the National Technical University. She currently serves as a member of the President’s Council of Cornell Women. Steven E. Ramberg, Vice-Chair, is a Senior Researcher at the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University. He recently held the Chief of Naval Research Chair at the National Defense University (NDU) and has regularly participated in studies, panels, and lectures for NDU, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Ocean Council via the Ocean Research and Resources Advisory Panel, and others. During his career, he served as a Fellow and as Vice President for Arete Associates during 2007 to 2010; as the Director of the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) in LaSpezia, Italy, from 2003 to 2007; and as Director and Chief Scientist for the Office of Naval Research (ONR) from 2001 to 2003 after joining ONR in 1988. His career at ONR also involved oversight of ocean, atmosphere, and space programs in basic research through applied programs, including the Navy-owned research vessels in the academic fleet, as well as inaugurating the National Ocean Partnership Program across 12 federal agencies. At the NURC, he focused on maritime, mostly undersea, research programs while advising NATO in a number of informal and formal settings including research and technology strategies, coordination of programs among the 26 NATO nations, and transformation of NATO capabilities. Earlier, he worked at the Naval Research Laboratory where he published more than 60 unclassified papers in the archival literature on fluid dynamics of bluff bodies, nonlinear ocean waves, stratified wakes, turbulence near a free surface, and related remote-sensing topics.

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 68 Dr. Ramberg earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from The Catholic University of America. Michael S. Bruno is the Provost at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Prior to his appointment, he was the Dean of the School of Engineering and Science, and Professor of Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. He was also the Director of the Center for Maritime Security, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security National Center of Excellence. Dr. Bruno is a Visiting Professor in Mechanical Engineering at University College London. His research and teaching interests include ocean observation systems, maritime security, and community resilience. He is the author of more than 100 technical publications in various aspects of these fields. He has served on numerous advisory committees and boards, including chairing the Marine Board of the National Academies; the Ocean Research Advisory Panel; the Naval Research Advisory Committee; and the Group on Earth Observations Coastal Zone Community of Practice. He serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Marine Environmental Engineering. A Fulbright Scholar (1996 appointment at the Aristotle University, Greece), Dr. Bruno is also a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He received the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award in 1991, and the Outstanding Service Award from the ASCE in 1988. Dr. Bruno holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, an M.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. degree in civil and ocean engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science & Engineering. Thomas M. Jahns (NAE) is the Grainger Professor of Power Electronics and Electric Machines at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and has been a driving force behind the development of high-performance permanent magnet (PM) synchronous machine drives, distinguished by magnets in their spinning rotors. Since early in his professional career at General Electric, Dr. Jahns has made important technical contributions leading to pioneering applications of PM drives in machine tools, home appliances, aerospace actuators, and electric vehicles. Drawing on these principles, nearly all hybrid- and battery-electric passenger vehicles in high-volume commercial production today have adopted PM synchronous machines for their electric propulsion systems. An Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow, Dr. Jahns’s many honors include the 2005 IEEE Nikola Tesla Technical Field Award that recognizes the significance of his PM machine contributions. He has served as president of the IEEE Power Electronics Society and as Division II Director on the IEEE Board of Directors. Both the IEEE Industry Applications Society and the IEEE Power Electronics Society have recognized him as a Distinguished Lecturer. He has served on a number of National Academies committees including the Committee on Review of the 21st Century Truck Partnership, Phase 1; the Review for the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative, Phase 1; and the Committee on the Advanced Automotive Technologies Plan. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jennifer G. Michaeli is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology with a joint appointment at Old Dominion University’s (ODU’s) Batten College of Engineering and Technology (BCET) and the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center. Prior to ODU, Dr. Michaeli was a naval architect for the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division,

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 69 where she led design, construction, and experimentation programs for high-performance vessels and associated technologies for the United States and partnering nations. She also worked in the marine industry, overseeing design and construction of manned and unmanned vessels for military and commercial applications. Her current research interests focus on digital tools and technologies to improve design, construction, and maintenance for naval vessels and aligning workforce development programs to harness these digital technologies. Dr. Michaeli earned her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from ODU (2010), her M.S. degree in ocean systems management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1999), and B.S. degrees in naval architecture and marine engineering from Webb Institute (1998). She is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the State Council of Higher Education of Virginia Outstanding Faculty Rising Star Award (2017), ODU BCET Excellence in Research Award (2016), RADM Melville Award for Outstanding Technical Achievement NSWCCD (2007), and the American Society of Naval Engineers Young Engineer of the Year Award (2006). Dr. Michaeli was elevated to Fellow by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (2017) and was selected by the membership at large to serve as a National Councilor for the American Society of Naval Engineers (2014–2016). She has been a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Virginia since 2004. RADM Marc Y. E. Pelaez (USN, retired) is a retired Vice President at Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. Upon joining Newport News Shipbuilding in 1996, he served as Vice President, Engineering and then Vice President, Business and Technology Development. Previously, he served for 28 years in the United States Navy and retired with the rank of Rear Admiral. His experience in the Navy was very broad and included numerous nuclear-powered submarine assignments. From 1982 to 1983 he served as head of submarine research and development at the Naval Sea Systems Command. From 1984 to 1987 he commanded the nuclear-powered attack submarine U.S.S. Sunfish (SSN 649). Following his submarine command, he served from 1988 to 1990 as Director of Submarine Technology at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). From 1990 to 1993 he served as Executive Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition. From 1993 to 1996 Rear Admiral Pelaez served as the 18th Chief of Naval Research, where he was responsible for all science and technology development for the Department of the Navy. He currently is Lead Independent Director at II-VI Incorporated (Nasdaq:IIVI). Rear Admiral Pelaez is a 1968 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. VADM Ronald A. Route (USN, retired) served as President, Naval Postgraduate School from September 2013 until January 2019. He came to the assignment with more than 20 years of leadership experience at the senior executive and operational level, which included responsibilities in graduate education, program requirements and resources, international affairs, research and development, and ethics. VADM Route’s significant career assignments include President of the Naval War College, and Commander, Navy Warfare Development Command. He also served in two earlier flag officer assignments leading major divisions on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations: Director of Navy Programming and Director, Politico-Military Affairs. A career Surface Warfare Officer, VADM Route’s sea duty included assignments and deployments in cruisers, destroyers, frigates, and aircraft carriers; he commanded the AEGIS cruiser USS LAKE ERIE (CG 70) and the guided-missile destroyer USS DEWEY (DDG 45). His most recent command at sea was the USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) Carrier

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 70 Strike Group of ten ships plus the embarked carrier air wing. After retirement from the Navy in 2008, VADM Route spent more than three years as Senior Vice President at Burdeshaw Associates, Ltd.—an executive-level consulting firm specializing in defense industry and government business. VADM Route holds a bachelor’s of science in systems engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, and a master’s of science in Operations Research from the Naval Postgraduate School. He also served as the Navy’s Senior Military Fellow on the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City, and attended the Executive Business Course, Kenan-Flager Business School at the University of North Carolina. Jessica K. Shang is Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Rochester. Her research interests include wakes of ships and bluff bodies; vascular fluid mechanics; fluid-structure interactions; and biomechanics. Previously she was a post- doctoral research fellow at the Stanford University School of Medicine where she studied biologically inspired fluid mechanics (e.g., locomotion, cardiovascular flows). In 2017, she was Office of Naval Research Summer Faculty Research Fellow. She has an A.B. from Harvard College and a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. Alexandra (Alex) Techet is a Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). During her doctoral studies at MIT she received both the prestigious Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate fellowship, as well as the Link Foundation fellowship in Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation. In 2002, after a brief post-doc at Princeton University in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Professor Techet returned to MIT as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ocean Engineering. In 2005, Professor Techet joined the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT when the two departments merged. She also holds a guest appointment at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and works with researchers there to develop oceangoing instrumentation. Professor Techet’s research is in the area of experimental hydrodynamics and aims to address long- standing hydrodynamics problems faced by the U.S. Navy and the ocean science and engineering communities through rigorous experimental investigation and imaging. Professor Techet was a recipient of the 2004 Office of Naval Research Young Investigators Award. Her imaging work has been recognized several times (2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011) by the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Gallery of Fluid Motion and has been featured on the cover of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics and in the Discovery Channel Time Warp television series. She received her B.S.E. in mechanical and aerospace engineering in 1995 from Princeton University and then graduated from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in oceanographic engineering with an M.S. in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2001. Jennifer Kehl Waters is a Professor in the Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA). She teaches primarily core and elective ocean engineering courses, and is involved in various ocean engineering and naval architecture research projects. She is active in a variety of USNA and external professional committees. Prior to her arrival at USNA in 1994, she was research assistant in the Davidson Laboratory, Stevens Institute of Technology (1991–1994) and research assistant, Webb Institute of Naval Architecture. Professor Waters’s research interests bridge the fields of naval architecture and ocean engineering. Research sponsors have included the Office

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs 71 of Naval Research, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center. She has a bachelor’s degree in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering from the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, and a master’s and a Ph.D. in ocean engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. Yin Lu (Julie) Young is a Professor at the Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and the Director of the Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on advancing the fundamental understanding of the dynamic response and stability of adaptive marine structures in multiphase flows. Dr. Young served as the Society of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (SNAME) representative on the United States National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics between 2009 and 2014, and she is an active member on the SNAME H-8 (Propulsion Hydrodynamics) Panel. Professor Young has written more than 200 journal and conference papers in the area of fluid-structure interactions related to marine and coastal structures, and she has acted as a consultant to government and industry. Dr. Young earned her Ph.D. in civil engineering from The University of Texas at Austin. Dick K. P. Yue is the Philip J. Solondz Professor of Engineering, Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering, and Head of the Ocean Science & Engineering Area in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, at MIT. He received all his degrees (S.B., S.M. and Sc.D. in Civil Engineering) from MIT, and has been a faculty member at MIT since 1983. His research and teaching are in marine hydrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and computational methods with applications to coastal and ocean engineering. His research focus is in theoretical and computational hydrodynamics, and he is internationally recognized for his extensive work on ocean and coastal wave dynamics, nonlinear wave mechanics, and large-amplitude motions and loads on offshore structures. He has also made important contributions to elucidating the hydrodynamics of fish swimming, the complex mechanisms at the air-sea interface and their effects on interfacial processes. He has authored/co-authored some three hundred papers and a two-volume textbook on theory and applications of ocean wave hydrodynamics. He was the Associate Dean of Engineering at MIT from 1999-2007 during which time he was the originator of MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW), the Founding Faculty Director of the MIT Engineering Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program (UPOP), and the Founding Faculty Director of MIT Engineering Professional Educational Programs (PEP) office. In 2008, Professor Yue received the prestigious MIT Gordon Y. Billard Award for services of outstanding merit to the Institute.

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The U.S. Navy has many unique naval engineering needs that demand a highly capable and robust U.S. naval engineering enterprise. In seeking an independent review of the unclassified elements of its National Naval Responsibilities—Naval Engineering (NNR-NE) program, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) asked for recommendations on ways to ensure the program meets the many naval engineering research, education, and workforce needs that will be critical to the Future Navy.

Toward New Naval Platforms: A Strategic View of the Future of Naval Engineering recommends a number of strategies, including advice that ONR adopt a “lead, leverage, and monitor” framework for the programming, prioritization, and integration of its investments within and across the NNR-NE’s three “pillars” of science and technology (S&T), education and workforce development, and experimental infrastructure.

The report points out that as the technological landscape critical to naval engineering continues to expand at a rapid pace, NNR-NE must make strategic choices about when it should invest directly in research that meets naval-unique S&T needs, and when it should leverage technological advances from other domains.

Likewise, the report points to the importance of the NNR-NE making direct investments to inspire STEM interest among K-12 students and attract undergraduate and graduate students to the field of naval engineering but also to leverage the many STEM programs found elsewhere in the Navy and Department of Defense.

The report stresses the importance of engaging individuals from under-represented groups to expand the naval engineering talent pool and to find creative ways to expedite the recruitment of workers to Navy-critical professions by providing naval engineering graduates with early work opportunities while awaiting security clearances.

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