National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 8 Conclusions, High Priority Issues Requiring Immediate Action, and Research Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25603.
×
Page 178
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25603.
×
Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25603.
×
Page 180
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25603.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25603.
×
Page 182

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix Committee and Staff Biographies Robert Floden (Chair) is dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University and a university distinguished professor of teacher education, measurement and quantitative methods, mathematics education, educational psychology and educational policy. He has studied teacher education and other influences on teaching and learning, including work on the cultures of teaching, teacher development, the character and effects of teacher education and how policy is linked to classroom practice. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, for which he serves as Secretary-Treasurer. He is co-editor of the Journal of Teacher Education and serves on the Board of Directors for the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Floden has a Ph.D. in the philosophy in education with a minor in evaluation from Stanford University. Anne Marie Bergen is a science teaching specialist at Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo, California, where she educates the next generation of STEM teachers using the experience she gained during a 25-year career as an environmental educator and elementary school science instructor. Bergen has contributed to the promotion and improvement of elementary science and STEM state and nationally to include chairing the California Teacher Advisory Council (CalTAC) for the California Council on Science and Technology (CCST). She has won several awards for her skill in the classroom, including California Teacher of the Year, Amgen Award for Science Teaching Excellence, and Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Math. She has an M.A. in education leadership from St. Mary’s. Malcolm Butler is professor and director of the School of Teacher Education, and coordinator of the Ph.D. Program in Science Education at the University of Central Florida. Butler also has a secondary appointment with the Learning Sciences Faculty Cluster at UCF. Butler has taught mathematics and science to elementary, middle and high school students. He has also been affiliated with the College of William and Mary, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, the University of Georgia, and the University of South Florida. In addition to other publications, Butler is one of the authors of the K–5 science curriculum, National Geographic Science. He has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction with an emphasis in science education from the University of Florida. Kenne Dibner is a senior program officer with the Board on Science Education. She served as the study director for the National Academies consensus study Science Literacy: Concepts, Contexts, and Consequences, as well as the deputy director for Indicators for Monitoring Undergraduate STEM Education. Prior to this position, Dibner worked as a research associate at Policy Studies Associations, Inc., where she conducted evaluation of education policies and programs for government agencies, foundation, and school districts. She also served as a research consultant with the Center on Education Policy and served as a legal intern for the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Education and the Workforce. She has a B.A. in English literature from Skidmore College and a Ph.D. in education policy from Michigan State University. Marcy Garza Davis has worked in education more than 20 years and has spent 13 of those years PREPUBLICATION COPY – UNCORRECTED PROOFS A-1

as a school administrator. She is currently the Principal at John F. Kennedy Elementary School in West Oso Independent School District in Corpus Christi, Texas. Under her leadership, JFK Elementary is implementing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) curriculum. Garza Davis earned her B.A. and M.S. at Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi. She is the recipient of Texas A&M University’s annual literacy award, which recognizes outstanding work serving students, teachers, and community. Dan Goldhaber is the director of the Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER) at the American Institutes for Research and the Director of the Center for Education Data & Research (CEDR) at the University of Washington. Both CALDER and CEDR use administrative data to do research that informs decisions about policy and practice. Goldhaber’s work focuses on issues of educational productivity and reform at the K–12 level, including the broad array of human capital policies that influence the composition, distribution, and quality of teachers in the workforce, and connections between students' K–12 experiences and postsecondary outcomes. He has a Ph.D. in labor economics from Cornell University. Susan Gomez-Zwiep is professor of Science Education at California State University, Long Beach. Her path into science education began with teaching middle school science in a mid-size, urban school district in Southern California. One of her research areas, science and language development, grew from her experience working with English language learners as a classroom teacher; using language to provide equitable access to science learning and to accelerate language development. Gomez-Zwiep is also interested in learning that occurs across content domains such as integrations across English Language Arts, Math and Science. In addition to working with preservice teachers at CSULB, she is heavily involved in teacher professional development and serves as a Regional Director for the K12 Alliance at WestEd. She has a Ph.D. in science education from the University of Southern California. Jason A. Grissom is associate professor of Public Policy and Education and (by courtesy) of Political Science at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College. He serves as faculty director of the Tennessee Education Research Alliance, a research-policy-practice partnership that produces research to inform Tennessee’s school improvement efforts. Grissom’s research uses large-scale administrative and survey data to answer policy-relevant questions about school leadership, educator mobility, educational equity, and the intersections among the three. He received the Wilder Award for Scholarship in Social Equity and Public Policy, co-sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration and the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University. Grissom holds a Master’s degree in education and a Ph.D. in political economics from Stanford University. Anne-Lise Halvorsen is an associate professor in the Department of Teacher Education and Ph.D. coordinator of the Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education Program at Michigan State University. Her research interests are elementary social studies education, historical inquiry, project-based learning, the history of education, the integration of social studies and literacy, and teacher preparation in the social studies. Halvorsen was awarded the Michigan Council for the Social Studies College Educator of the Year in 2017. She is a former kindergarten teacher and a former curriculum writer for the state of Michigan. Halvorsen has a Ph.D. in educational foundations and policy from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. PREPUBLICATION COPY – UNCORRECTED PROOFS A-2

Deena Khalil is an associate professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Howard University. Khalil’s research explores teacher and leader praxes and other influences on teaching and learning, including the affective dimension of teaching and leading; the micro sociocultural and macro sociopolitical dynamics of learning environments; and how teacher and leader development may support their interrogation of the rampant inequities in urban education systems, including access to STEM subjects. This work spans multiple domains, including math education, leadership and policy, urban education, and teacher education. She earned her interdisciplinary joint Ph.D. in urban systems, with a focus on urban education policy and math education from Rutgers University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Kara Jackson is an associate professor of mathematics education at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her research focuses on specifying forms of practice that support a broad range of learners to participate substantially in rigorous mathematical activity and to develop productive mathematical identities, and how to support teachers to develop such forms of practice at scale (e.g., the development of systems of professional learning across role groups and contexts). She is an Executive Editor of Cognition and Instruction. She completed her doctorate in Education, Culture, and Society with an emphasis in mathematics education at the University of Pennsylvania, and completed her bachelor’s degree in mathematics at Bates College. She taught secondary mathematics in Vanuatu as a Peace Corps volunteer and was a mathematics specialist, supporting both youth and their families, for the Say Yes to Education Foundation in Philadelphia. Bruce Johnson is professor of environmental learning and science education and dean of the College of Education at University of Arizona, where he holds the Paul L. Lindsey and Kathy J. Alexander Chair. His research includes the teaching and learning of ecological concepts, development of environmental values/attitudes and actions, and curriculum development and evaluation. He serves as Director of the Earth Education Research and Evaluation (EERE) Team, which has conducted research on children’s ecological understandings, environmental values/attitudes, and environmental actions worldwide. He is also International Program Coordinator for The Institute for Earth Education (IEE); Principal Investigator of the Teachers in Industry program; and Co-Investigator of Promoting Behavioral & Value Change through Outdoor Environmental Education. He was previously an elementary and middle school teacher in Arizona and New Mexico and director of outdoor schools in New Mexico and Australia. Johnson has a Ph.D. in educational psychology with a minor in science education from the University of New Mexico. Judith Warren Little is the Carol Liu Professor of Education Policy, emerita, and former dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. She r worked as Senior Program Director at Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development (now WestEd) before joining the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley in 1987. Little’s research focuses on teachers’ work and careers, the organizational and policy contexts of teaching, and teachers’ professional development. In recent years, she has also pursued an interest in national and international developments in the composition, quality, distribution, and preparation of the teacher workforce, and has become involved in cross-field studies of education PREPUBLICATION COPY – UNCORRECTED PROOFS A-3

for the professions. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, an elected Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, and a recipient of the Frank H. Klassen Award for leadership and scholarly contributions in teacher education from the International Council on Education for Teaching (ICET). She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Colorado Tiffany Neill is the executive director of Curriculum and Instruction for the Oklahoma State Board of Education and the Past-President for the Council of State Science Supervisors, an organization comprised of state leaders for science education. Neill is also the Co-Principal Investigator for the National Science Foundation Project, ACESSE, working directly with thirteen states to promote equity and coherence in state science education systems. In her role at the Oklahoma State Department of Education, she works to support districts and educators in aligning their curriculum and instruction to standards and supports thirteen curriculum directors in similar efforts with various disciplines. Neill is also completing a Ph.D. in science curriculum and instruction at the University of Oklahoma. Thomas Rudin is the director of the Board on Higher Education and Workforce (BHEW) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to joining the National Academies, Rudin served as senior vice president for career readiness and senior vice president for advocacy, government relations, and development at the College Board. During his tenure at the College Board, he also served as vice president for government relations and executive director of grants planning and management. Before joining the College Board, Rudin was a policy analyst at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. In the early 1980s, he directed the work of the Governor’s Task Force on Science and Technology for North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt, Jr., where he was involved in several new state initiatives. He received a B.A. from Purdue University, and he holds master’s degrees in public administration and in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Layne Scherer (Co-Study Director) is a program officer with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and served as the study director for the consensus report Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century. Prior to joining the National Academies, Scherer was a science assistant at the National Science Foundation with the officer of the Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources and served as an executive secretary under the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education. As a part of her cross-agency work, Scherer developed an interest in performance management and completed training as a facilitator and graphic recorder with the Performance Improvement Council. She earned her B.A. with concentrations in English literature and the history of art from the University of Michigan and her master’s in public policy from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. Amy Stephens (Co-Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Board on Science Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is also an adjunct professor for the Southern New Hampshire University Psychology Department, teaching graduate level courses in cognitive psychology. She was the study director for the workshop on Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and recently released consensus report English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives. She is PREPUBLICATION COPY – UNCORRECTED PROOFS A-4

currently the study director for the study on The Role of Authentic STEM Learning Experiences in Developing Interest and Competencies for Technology and Computing. She holds a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University. Heidi Schweingruber is the director for the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director or co-study director for a wide range of studies, including those on revising national standards for K–12 science education, learning and teaching in grades K–8, and mathematics learning in early childhood. She also co-authored two award-winning books for practitioners that translate findings of National Academies’ reports for a broader audience, on using research in K–8 science classrooms and on information science education. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. She also previously served on the faculty of Rice University and as the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project, and outreach program in K–12 mathematics education. She has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan. PREPUBLICATION COPY – UNCORRECTED PROOFS A-5

Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace Get This Book
×
Buy Prepub | $69.00 Buy Paperback | $60.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Teachers play a critical role in the success of their students, both academically and in regard to long term outcomes such as higher education participation and economic attainment. Expectations for teachers are increasing due to changing learning standards and a rapidly diversifying student population. At the same time, there are perceptions that the teaching workforce may be shifting toward a younger and less experienced demographic. These actual and perceived changes raise important questions about the ways teacher education may need to evolve in order to ensure that educators are able to meet the needs of students and provide them with classroom experiences that will put them on the path to future success.

Changing Expectations for the K-12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace explores the impact of the changing landscape of K-12 education and the potential for expansion of effective models, programs, and practices for teacher education. This report explores factors that contribute to understanding the current teacher workforce, changing expectations for teaching and learning, trends and developments in the teacher labor market, preservice teacher education, and opportunities for learning in the workplace and in-service professional development.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!