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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
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Appendix

Biosketches of the Committee

Edward C. Bishop (Chair) has diverse experience in industrial hygiene, environmental compliance, emergency response, and risk assessment. He had a 20-year career in the U.S. Air Force, in which he held a number of positions, including senior bioenvironmental engineering program manager in the Office of the Air Force Surgeon General. In that position, he developed and managed occupational health, industrial hygiene, and environmental protection programs worldwide. After his military career, Dr. Bishop spent 14 years with Parsons Corporation, where he held positions as vice president of project management and vice president of safety, health, quality, and risk. He also spent 11 years in project and risk management at HDR Engineering, Inc. He has served on several National Academies committees, including chair of the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels and as a member of the Committee on Potential Health Risks from Recurrent Lead Exposure of DoD Firing Range Personnel and the Committee on Toxicological Risks to Deployed Military Personnel. Dr. Bishop received his MS in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD in environmental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.

Richard A. Corley is an emeritus laboratory fellow (retired) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, and is currently the sole proprietor of Greek Creek Toxicokinetics Consulting, LLC. He continues to specialize in the development and evaluation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models and multi-scale computational fluid-dynamic models of the respiratory system. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers on oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicology; on modes of action of a variety of industrial and consumer chemicals; and on pharmacokinetic modeling and its applications in human health risk assessment. Dr. Corley has served on several National Academies committees, including the Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion, the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, the Committee to Review EPA’s Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde, the Committee to Review EPA’s Draft State of the Science Paper on Nonmonotonic Dose Response, the Committee to Review Ad-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×

vances Made to the IRIS Process, and the Workshop Committee to Support Development of EPA’s IRIS Toxicological Reviews. He received his PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Anneclaire J. De Roos is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health. Her research has primarily focused on chemicals as risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases. Exposures of interest include workplace hazards (pesticides, solvents), persistent organic pollutants (polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins), and point sources of pollution (industrial facilities, traffic). More recent projects address health in cities, including risks from extreme climatic events and triggers of asthma in the urban environment. Dr. De Roos teaches courses in principles and practice of environmental and occupational health, health impact assessment, quantitative risk analysis, and weight-of-evidence evaluation for hazard identification. Dr. De Roos is an associate editor for the journal Environmental Health Perspectives and has served as an expert/peer reviewer for several risk evaluations in recent years, including those reviewing pesticides for the International Agency for Research on Cancer monograph series, formaldehyde for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Report on Carcinogens, and methylene chloride in paint stripping use for a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk assessment. She received her MPH in biostatistics and epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

David C. Dorman is a professor of toxicology in the Department of Molecular Biosciences of North Carolina State University. Dr. Dorman’s research interests include neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and cognition and olfactory in military working dogs. He has served as a member or chair of several National Academies committees, including two Committees on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants, the Committee to Evaluate Potential Health Risks from Recurrent Lead Exposure to DOD Firing Range Personnel, the Committee to Review EPA’s Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde, the Committee to Review the IRIS Process, and the Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity. He received his DVM from Colorado State University. He completed a combined PhD and residency program in toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicology. He is a national associate of the National Research Council and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Theodore J. Hogan is an associate professor in the Department of Technology at the Northern Illinois University College of Engineering and Engineering Technology. His research interests are in environmental and occupational exposure to nanoparticles, chemical skin exposures and controls, chemical exposure guidelines, and environmental risk communication. He is a member of the Threshold

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×

Limit Values Chemical Substances Committee of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and a member of the Argonne National Laboratories Institutional Biosafety Committee. Dr. Hogan received his MS and PhD in industrial hygiene from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and is a certified industrial hygienist.

Juleen Lam is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Sciences at the California State University, East Bay. She is also an affiliate researcher in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. Her research interests are in environmental epidemiology, evaluation of population exposures to environmental contaminants, assessment and communication of environmental risks, and reproductive and developmental health. She specializes in analysis of environmental health data and development and application of risk assessment methods. Of particular note, Dr. Lam has been involved in the development of systematic review methods for environmental health data and has been a pivotal part in implementing, publishing, and disseminating these approaches in both academic and government settings. She is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Board of Scientific Counselors Chemical Safety for Sustainability Subcommittee. She received her MS in environmental engineering management from The George Washington University, and her MHS in biostatistics and PhD in environmental health policy from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Karen A. Robinson is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also director of the Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center and is a member of the core faculty in the Center for Clinical Trials and Evidence Synthesis at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Robinson’s research focuses on evidence-based health care and evidence-based research. She conducts systematic reviews that are used to develop clinical practice guidelines and to inform other health decisions. She served on the National Academies Committee on Endocrine-Related Low-Dose Toxicity and the Committee to Review Advances Made to the IRIS Process. Dr. Robinson received an MSc in health sciences from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, and a PhD in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Elizabeth P. Ryan is an associate professor in the Division of Toxicology of the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University. Her research explores the complex interactions of food consumption with gut microbiota and the immune system. Her interests span enteric diseases from pathogen-induced diarrhea and colon cancer control and prevention, with translational application to the broader fields of microbiology, immunology, oncology, pediatrics, and nutrition. Dr. Ryan has served on several scientific review panels for the National Institutes of Health, including the Endocrinology, Metabolism, Nutrition and Reproductive Sciences Integrated Review Group and the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×

Special Emphasis Panel on Molecular Profiles and Biomarkers of Food and Nutrient Intake. She received her MS and PhD in molecular toxicology and environmental medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry.

Kary E. Thompson is director of developmental and reproductive toxicology in drug safety evaluation, research, and development at Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. She is responsible for overseeing Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology study design and reviewing all protocols and reports, is a toxicology representative to drug development teams for small molecules and biologics, and is a subject matter expert for developmental, reproductive, and juvenile toxicity strategy, interpretation, integration, and risk assessment. She also holds an adjunct faculty position at Rutgers University’s Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. Dr. Thompson is a past president of the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology, is treasurer of the Middle Atlantic Reproduction and Teratology Association, and is co-chair of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute’s Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee. She received her MS and PhD in physiological sciences from the University of Arizona.

Carol S. Wood is a distinguished staff scientist in the Environmental Science Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. She has more than 20 years of experience as a toxicologist, with extensive work performing risk assessments of inhalation/pulmonary and oral toxicity from exposure to a variety of chemicals. Her past work has included developing acute exposure guideline levels and provisional advisory levels, in which health-based exposure levels are developed for priority toxic chemicals. These projects often used toxicokinetic data and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models for extrapolating animal toxicology data to humans. Dr. Wood is a past president of the American Board of Toxicology. She is certified in general toxicology by the American Board of Toxicology. She served on the National Academies Committee on the Review of Clinical Guidance for the Care of Health Conditions Identified by the Camp Lejeune Legislation, the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines, and the Committee on Gulf War and Health, Volume 11 (Generational Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War). Dr. Wood received her MS in toxicology from Mississippi State University and her PhD in toxicology from Oregon State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of the Committee." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Review of DOD's Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25610.
×
Page 66
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Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a solvent that is used as a degreasing agent, a chemical intermediate in refrigerant manufacture, and a component of spot removers and adhesives. It is produced in mass quantities but creates dangerous vapors and is an environmental contaminant at many industrial and government facilities, including facilities run by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). It is important to determine the safe occupational exposure level (OEL) for the solvent in order to protect the health of workers who are exposed to its vapors. However, there are concerns that the current occupational standards insufficiently protect workers from these health threats.

Review of DOD’s Approach to Deriving an Occupational Exposure Level for Trichloroethylene makes recommendations to improve the DoD’s approach to developing an OEL for TCE, strengthen transparency of the process, and improve confidence in the final OEL value. This report reviews the DoD’s approach using a literature review, evidence synthesis based on weight of evidence [WOE], point-of-departure derivation, physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling, extrapolation tools, and explores other elements of the process of deriving an OEL for TCE. It examines scientific approaches to developing exposure values and cancer risk levels, defining the scope of the problem, and improving hazard identification.

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