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Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education (2020)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
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Appendix A

Committee Biographies

Ellen J. Kullman (NAE), Chair, is CEO and president of Carbon and retired CEO and chair of DuPont, where she began a 27-year career in 1988 after working for Westinghouse and General Electric. She served as president and executive vice president at DuPont until she was named CEO in early 2009 and board chair later that year. As a business leader, she led double-digit growth of the company’s safety and protection business portfolio, and started-up two successful high-growth businesses known today as DuPont Industrial Biosciences and DuPont Sustainable Solutions. During her seven years as CEO, she led the company’s focus on growth in emerging international markets and championed the power of DuPont science and global market knowledge to transform industries. She is past president of the US China Business Council and serves on the boards of Goldman Sachs, Amgen, United Technologies Corp., and Dell Technologies as well as the board of trustees of Northwestern University. Mrs. Kullman has been named one of the “50 Most Powerful Women in Business” by Fortune and one of the “World’s Most Powerful Women” by Forbes. She has received honorary doctorates from Lehigh University, the University of Edinburgh, and the University of Delaware. A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Mrs. Kullman holds a BS in mechanical engineering from Tufts University and an MS in Management from Kellogg School of Management of Northwestern University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

Diran Apelian (NAE) is Distinguished Professor of Materials Science at the University of California, Irvine and chief strategy officer for the Samueli School of Engineering. He is on leave from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), where he has been the Alcoa-Howmet Professor of Engineering and was founding director of the Metal Processing Institute (MPI). Early in his career he worked at Bethlehem Steel’s Homer Research Laboratories until in 1976 he joined the faculty of Drexel University, where he rose from professor to head of the Department of Materials Engineering, associate dean of the College of Engineering, and vice provost of the university. He joined WPI in July 1990 as provost. During the past decade he has worked on sustainable development issues, particularly resource recovery, reuse, and recycling. Professor Apelian is the recipient of many distinguished honors and awards, national and international; has over 700 publications to his credit; and serves on several technical, corporate, and editorial boards. He is a fellow of TMS, ASM, and APMI, and an elected member of the NAE, National Academy of Inventors, European Academy of Sciences, and Armenian Academy of Sciences. The NAE’s 2016 Bernard Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering Education was awarded to WPI and Dr. Apelian and colleagues Kris Wobbe, Art Heinricher, and Rick Vaz. He received his BS in metallurgical engineering from Drexel University in 1968 and his doctorate in materials science and engineering from MIT in 1972.

Rodger Bybee was executive director of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), a nonprofit organization in Colorado Springs that develops curriculum materials, provides professional development in science education, and conducts research and evaluation on curriculum reform. He was principal investigator for four National Science Foundation (NSF) programs as well as projects to develop curriculum frameworks for teaching about the history and nature of science and technology for biology education at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges. Before joining BSCS, he was executive director of the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education of the National Research Council (NRC), where he participated in development of the National Science Education Standards and chaired the project’s science content working group (1993–95). He has been active in education for more than 40 years, and taught science at the elementary, secondary, and college levels, including as a professor of education at Carleton College (1972–85). He is an advisor to the Trends in Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) video projects, chaired the OECD National Forum for the 2006 Program for International Student Assessment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

(PISA) in Science, and coauthored Teaching Secondary School Science: Strategies for Developing Scientific Literacy (Pearson, 2007). Among his accolades are the Distinguished Service to Science Education Award (1998), presented by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA); the first American Institute of Biological Sciences Education Award (2001); and the 2007 Robert H. Carleton Award, NSTA’s highest honor for national leadership in science education. He has a BA and MA from the University of Northern Colorado, and PhD in science education and psychology from New York University.

Jason Coleman is cofounder and executive director of Project SYNCERE (Supporting Youth Needs with Core Engineering Research Experiments), an educational not-for-profit organization dedicated to preparing under-served students for careers in the STEM fields. At the start of his career Mr. Coleman worked in the aerospace industry at BAE Systems and then at Motorola Mobility. During his tenure in corporate America, he noticed the dismal numbers of minorities and women in the fields of engineering and decided a change was necessary. In 2008 he cofounded Project SYNCERE to bring about that change. As a product of the Chicago public school system (Whitney Young), he wanted to ensure access to quality programs for innercity youth. With programming in more than 30 Chicago area schools, Project SYNCERE has served over 10,000 students, nurturing their interest in STEM and improving their understanding of engineering. The program has been recognized for its outstanding work by the Urban League of Chicago, NBCUniversal, N’Digo, Diversity in Action, Black Enterprise, and the Chicago Sun-Times. The program reports graduation of 100% of participating high school seniors, with 86% of them going on to college to major in a STEM-related field, and 90% of these students majoring in engineering. Mr. Coleman also volunteers with other local nonprofits and serves on the advisory board for the Chicago Children’s Museum. He has a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Southern California.

David Crismond is program director of childhood education and an associate professor at the City College of New York’s School of Education, with a courtesy appointment with CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering. He teaches elementary science and engineering methods courses for pre- and in-service teachers, and an inquiry and writing seminar for freshmen where students use design thinking to plan their college and vocational careers. His research interests involve K–16 integrated STEM learning and teaching, with a focus on the use of science and math concepts in the context of hands-on tech-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

nology investigations and engineering design tasks. He and colleagues have developed a framework that describes key dimensions of teachers’ design pedagogical content knowledge, and guidelines for science and technology education teachers to create video-based teaching portfolios using engineering activities in the classroom. With NSF funding, he created design-based science curriculum at TERC and Georgia Tech, as well as video-based teacher professional development materials for the website Design in the Classroom. After 11 years as a classroom teacher, he earned an MS from MIT’s ME department and an EdD from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education.

Marshall (Marty) Davis is the supervisor of K–12 science for St. Paul Public Schools, focusing on science and engineering curriculum, teacher professional development, and community partnerships. He is a co-PI on an $8,000,000 NSF grant focused on ways to incorporate all aspects of STEM in a single scenario-based unit, and on a Math Science Partnership grant with BSCS and the University of Minnesota STEM Center. He started his career in education teaching 6th–8th grade science at a private school in St. Paul. In 1988 he accepted a position as a 5th grade teacher in the Omaha Public Schools but moved back to St. Paul in 1992 to be the elementary science specialist at Hancock Hamline University Collaborative Magnet. He also served on district and state science committees and was awarded the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science in 2000. As a district science coach since 2002 he has coached science teachers at the elementary, middle, and high school levels, and he teaches elementary science methods courses for preservice teachers at the University of Minnesota. Mr. Davis has served on NSTA science conference committees, facilitated the creation and adoption of the 2003 and 2009 Minnesota Academic Science Standards, which included engineering standards as part of science, and was a state lead for the Next Generation Science Standards Review. He has served on a number of science and STEM committees and boards, including the executive board of SciMathMN, a nonpartisan business/K–16 coalition that promotes STEM in Minnesota. He graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1984 and earned a master’s in administration from the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Cheryl Farmer is director of Precollege Engineering Education Initiatives at the University of Texas at Austin, where her work focuses on creating and facilitating multidisciplinary collaborations to develop standards-based, research-based engineering curricula and instructional support programs.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

As cofounder of the NSF-funded UTeachEngineering program, she led UT Austin’s efforts to develop and roll out a high-quality, low-cost, hands-on, project-based high school engineering course; an innovative teacher professional development and induction program; and undergraduate and graduate degree programs for pre- and in-service teachers of engineering. In 2012, recognizing the need for clear guidance to assist K–12 teachers and administrators in selecting appropriate professional development opportunities for engineering, she launched a national effort to develop a research-based framework of Standards for Professional Development for K–12 Teachers of Engineering. Her previous work in higher education includes the creation of an academic enrichment and mentorship program for university freshmen with a focus on supporting first-generation college students. Ms. Farmer received the Dodd Teaching Excellence Award from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin. She has a BA in mathematics and French from UT Austin.

Jen Gutierrez began her education career in Arizona in 1988 teaching 1st–4th grades, including K–2 multiage classes. In 2006 she moved into the role of science curriculum specialist at the district level, coaching K–12 teachers, providing support in science instruction, and coordinating the districtwide science and engineering fair. After a year at the Arizona Science Center she joined the state Department of Education in 2014 as the K–12 STEM education specialist in the Standards Division. She “retired” in 2017 and now works as a K–12 STEM education consultant. She is a proud member of the NGSS writing team, including the Diversity and Equity team, and an endorsed trainer for the Museum of Science, Boston’s Engineering is Elementary (EiE) program working with teachers around the country. She remains active in science education at the state and national levels, currently serving as division director of professional learning in science education on the National Science Teaching Association’s board. She earned a BS in journalism and a postdegree K–8 certificate from Northern Arizona University (NAU), a master’s in elementary education from Arizona State University, and an administration certification from NAU.

Tanner Huffman is an assistant professor in the Department of Integrative STEM Education, School of Engineering at the College of New Jersey, and executive director of the Advancing Excellence in P–12 Engineering Education Research Collaborative (AE3). Before joining the faculty at TCNJ, he was director of research, assessment, and special projects at the Interna-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

tional Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA). While at ITEEA he secured funding from NSF, the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences, Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, and other private foundations to provide high-quality STEM curriculum and professional development to all students. He continues to serve ITEEA as a senior advisor and consultant. He is a strong advocate for K–12 engineering education, with experience as a middle and high school engineering and technology education teacher and a focus on social relevance and empowerment. Dr. Huffman has published in international journals and presented at regional, state, national, and international conferences. He has also served as a board member of the American Society for Engineering Education’s Precollege Engineering Education Division; advisor for Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab Satellite Network; and national event coordinator for the Test for Engineering Aptitude, Math, and Science (TEAMS) student competition. He has a PhD in engineering and technology from Purdue University.

Bryan Kind is vice president of programs at Project Lead The Way (PLTW). In this role he leads the PLTW Professional Development program, which supports over 75,000 computer science, biomedical science, and engineering pK–12 teachers across America, as well as the PLTW Production Team, which is responsible for creating dynamic student and teacher learning experiences. He is passionate about driving innovation and quality to produce inspiring and transformative learning experiences for pK–12 students and teachers. He was previously senior director of programs, director of professional development, director of elearning, and associate director of curriculum for engineering. Prior to joining PLTW, Mr. Kind was a technology and engineering teacher in the Milwaukee metro area. He also served as a PLTW Principles of Engineering Master Teacher and delivered teacher training experience across the country. He holds an MS in education administration and supervision from Concordia University Wisconsin and a bachelor of science in technology education from the University of Wisconsin–Stout.

Chentel Neat works at Colbert Museum Magnet school as the STEM magnet coordinator and the 2nd grade gifted/high achievers teacher. As a teacher with Broward County (FL) Public Schools for the past eight years she has taught both 1st and 2nd grades. Colbert’s magnet program is focused on STEM and the school uses various programs and curricula to enhance the STEM museum component of the program, including the Engineer-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

ing is Elementary curriculum to address the “E” in STEM. In 2013 Neat was recorded by the Museum of Science, Boston teaching an EiE unit and the recordings were developed into classroom videos for the EiE website to support teachers using the curriculum. Ms. Neat has also been awarded an EiE scholarship to train to become a professional development provider of the curriculum. She holds a BS in early childhood education from Florida International University and is ESOL and Gifted endorsed.

Brian J. Reiser is professor of learning sciences at Northwestern University, where his research examines how to make the scientific practices of argumentation, explanation, and modeling meaningful and effective for classroom teachers and students. He co-led the development of IQWST (Investigating and Questioning our World through Science and Technology), a three-year middle school curriculum that supports students in science practices to develop disciplinary core ideas. A member of the National Research Council’s Board on Science Education, Dr. Reiser also served on the NRC committees that authored A Framework for K–12 Science Education (which guided development of the Next Generation Science Standards), Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards, and Guide to Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards. In addition, he has worked with Achieve on tools to support NGSS implementation, and currently collaborates with state initiatives to design and provide professional development and to develop curriculum materials for K–12 teachers to support them in realizing NGSS reforms in their classrooms. Dr. Reiser earned his PhD in cognitive science from Yale University.

Maria C. Simani is executive director of the California Science Project (CSP), a statewide network providing professional development for K–12 teachers in science. Dr. Simani and CSP have contributed as lead writers of the new California Science Curriculum Framework, and since 2012 she has served on the Science Expert Committee of the California Department of Education to review and provide recommendations for the adoption and implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards. Dr. Simani served on the K–12 education subcommittee of the American Physical Society and has done research on brain functioning and learning at the Keck Institute for Integrative Neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco. The California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls nominated her in 2013 as a Trailblazer STEM Woman of the Year, and the California Science Teachers Association recognized her distinguished service to science educa-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

tion in both 2016 and 2019. She received her PhD in experimental particle physics in the Netherlands and then conducted particle physics research at DESY, Germany, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Blaire Thrasher is an engineering and technology education instructor at East Coweta Middle School in Senoia, Georgia. A middle school teacher for 13 years, she sponsors the First Lego League team and two Technology Student Association chapters at the middle and high school levels in her county. She is a member of the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) and has served as its state affiliate’s president, secretary, and reporter. In 2011 she was named Georgia’s Teacher of Excellence at the ITEEA Conference, in 2012 her engineering and technology program was designated an ITEEA Program of Excellence, and in 2013 she was named an ITEEA Emerging Leader. Ms. Thrasher is a National Teacher Effectiveness Coach and curriculum author for ITEEA’s Engineering by Design. She served the Georgia Department of Education as coordinator for the Engineering and Technology Education Standards revision in 2018–19. She earned a BS from Georgia Southern University in 2007 and a master’s from Valley City State University in 2010, both in technology education, and a specialist degree in curriculum and instruction from Valdosta State University in 2012.

Bruce Wellman, a National Board Certified Teacher of chemistry and engineering design at Olathe Engineering Academy at Olathe (KS) Northwest High School, has taught chemistry/AP chemistry in rural, urban, and suburban settings. He was an inaugural member of the National STEM Education Advisory Panel, which provides advice and recommendations to the US Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education (CoSTEM) for the federal government. He has organized and led professional development for STEM teachers and been active in bridging the gap between STEM education research and classroom practices, leading workshops on how to teach using a student-centered approach called Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL). He has mentored chemistry student-teachers and taught the Science Teaching Methods class for secondary preservice teachers at Rockhurst University (Kansas City, MO). He was coauthor/co-PI on the NSF-funded project “Promoting Engineering Problem Framing Skill Development in High School Science and Engineering Courses” (“Building Informed Designers”). Mr. Wellman is a member of the ASEE Board of Directors’ Committee on P–12 Engineering Education,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

served on the executive board of ASEE’s Pre-College Engineering Education Division, was the lead engineering standards reviewer for the Kansas Lead State NGSS Review Team. Among his honors, he received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching (2009) and was a Teacher Ambassador Fellow at the US Department of Education (2011–12) and a National STEM Teacher Ambassador for the National Science Teachers Association and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2017–18). He has a BS in general science (focus in chemistry) from Penn State University and MS in education from the University of Rochester.

Suzanne M. Wilson is a Neag Endowed Professor of Teacher Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Connecticut. She was a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University, where she served on the faculty for 26 years, and the first director of the Teacher Assessment Project, which developed prototype assessments for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. She has taught undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral classes in educational policy, teacher learning, and research methods, and directed 28 dissertations. At Michigan State, she collaborated on the National Center for Research on Teacher Education/Teacher Learning, the Educational Policy and Practice Study, and the National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching. She is co-PI on Learning Science as Inquiry with the Urban Advantage: Formal-Informal Collaborations to Increase Science Literacy and Student Learning, investigating what teachers learn from opportunities to engage in secondary science research. In her work she explores measures of teaching and teachers’ understanding that might be used for teacher education and education research, and studies jurisdictional battles over who should control teacher education and licensure. She has written on teacher knowledge, curriculum reform, educational policy, and teacher learning; authored California Dreaming: Reforming Mathematics Education (Yale, 2003); and edited Lee Shulman’s collection of essays, Wisdom of Practice: Essays on Teaching, Learning, and Learning to Teach (Jossey-Bass, 2004). Dr. Wilson’s undergraduate degree is in history and American studies from Brown University, and she has an MS in statistics and PhD in psychological studies in education from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
Page 233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
×
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Next: Appendix B: Educator Capacity Building in PreK12 Engineering Education: Workshop 1 Agenda: April 1820, 2017 »
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Engineering education is emerging as an important component of US K-12 education. Across the country, students in classrooms and after- and out-of-school programs are participating in hands-on, problem-focused learning activities using the engineering design process. These experiences can be engaging; support learning in other areas, such as science and mathematics; and provide a window into the important role of engineering in society. As the landscape of K-12 engineering education continues to grow and evolve, educators, administrators, and policy makers should consider the capacity of the US education system to meet current and anticipated needs for K-12 teachers of engineering.

Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education reviews existing curricula and programs as well as related research to understand current and anticipated future needs for engineering-literate K-12 educators in the United States and determine how these needs might be addressed. Key topics in this report include the preparation of K-12 engineering educators, professional pathways for K-12 engineering educators, and the role of higher education in preparing engineering educators. This report proposes steps that stakeholders - including professional development providers, postsecondary preservice education programs, postsecondary engineering and engineering technology programs, formal and informal educator credentialing organizations, and the education and learning sciences research communities - might take to increase the number, skill level, and confidence of K-12 teachers of engineering in the United States.

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