National Academies Press: OpenBook

Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop 1 Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
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Page 173
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
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Page 174
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop 1 Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25612.
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Page 175

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PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS Appendix B: Workshop 1 Agenda Agenda TUESDAY, April 18th: Keck 101 3:15 Setting the Stage: Guest Speaker David Evans, National Science Teachers Association  The political landscape for STEM education policy in the Trump era  Opportunities for engineering education related to the Every Student Succeeds Act  Opportunities for engineering education related to NGSS 4:00 – 5:30 Overarching Issues and Opportunities Facing US STEM Education: Implications for the Project Moderator: Rodger Bybee, Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Equity/inclusion/diversity/English Language Learners Okhee Lee, Professor of Childhood Education, NYU STEM learning in children Douglas Clements, University of Denver Students with disabilities and STEM education James Basham, University of Kansas Rural and urban settings Matthew Irvin, University of South Carolina 5:30 ADJOURN WEDNESDAY, April 19th: Keck 100 7:30 am Breakfast available 8:00 – 8:15 am Welcome and Overview of Workshop Objectives Ellen Kullman, Committee Chair 8:15 – 9:30 am Diverse Implementations of PreK-12 Engineering Education Moderators: David Crismond, City College of New York, and Brian Reiser, Northwestern University 1. Christine Cunningham, Engineering is Elementary 2. Bryan Kind, PLTW 3. Bernie Zubrowski, EDC 9:30 – 10:45 Pathways into PreK-12 Engineering: Educator Stories Part I am Moderator: Bruce Wellman, Olathe Public Schools Engineering Academy  A career changer with an engineering/engineering technology degree 173

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS Jose Rivas, Science Teacher, Lennox Math, Science and Technology Academy, Inglewood, CA  A middle school or high school science and engineering teacher Amy Morriss, Academy of Our Lady, New Orleans, LA  A middle school or high school math and engineering teacher Brandon Hernandez, Engineering Academy, Olathe, KS  A middle school or high school technology and engineering teacher Glenn Bradbury, Bozeman High School, Bozeman, MT 10:45 – 11:00 Break am 11:00 am – Pathways into PreK-12 Engineering: Educator Stories Part II 12:15 pm Moderator: Chentel Neat, Colbert Elementary  A middle school teacher Julia Harth, HB Whitehorne Middle School, Verona, NJ  An elementary teacher Christopher Kohnke, Colbert Elementary, Broward County, FL  Educators working in an informal setting (both museum/science center and in an after-school setting) Adrianne Wheeler, Project SYNCERE, Chicago, IL Angie Brayford, SHINE, Shenandoah District, PA 12:15 – 1:30 Working Lunch (Table topics?) pm - Staff and Committee will have some topics for discussion and others would be gathered using the “parking lot” method. 1:30 – 2:30 pm What works in educator professional development and what are common practices that don’t? Moderator: Suzanne Wilson, University of Connecticut Jim Short, Carnegie Corporation of NY Respondent to look more specifically at engineering education: Pam Lottero-Perdue, Towson University 2:30 – 4:00 pm Methods courses for science and engineering pre-service teachers: Similarities, differences, and implications Moderator: David Crismond, City College of New York Elementary Teacher Education Pam Lottero-Perdue, Towson University 174

PREPUBLICATION COPY, UNCORRECTED PROOFS Karen Worth, Wheelock College Secondary Teacher Education Robin Adams, Purdue University Ken Welty, University of Wisconsin-Stout 4:00 – 5:30 pm Breakout Sessions with Reporting Out (Topics/Questions Provided) ADJOURN THURSDAY, April 20th: Keck 105 9:30 – 10:45 State Standards for Engineering and Technology Education: Implications for am Preparation of PreK-12 Educators Moderator: Jen Gutierrez, K-12 STEM Education Consultant Tanner Huffman, The College of New Jersey (TE standards) Tamara Moore, Purdue University (NGSS/Professional Development) Deidre Sessoms, Professor of Education, CSU Sacramento (NGSS, Pre-Service Education) 10:45 – 11:30 Methods for demonstrating/determining K-12 educator competency to teach about am engineering (to include formal and informal approaches to credentialing) Moderator: Maria Simani, California Science Project Pat Yongpradit, Code.org (to describe challenges and issues in CS teacher credentialing) Michael De Miranda, Texas A&M University 175

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Engineering education is emerging as an important component of US K-12 education. Across the country, students in classrooms and after- and out-of-school programs are participating in hands-on, problem-focused learning activities using the engineering design process. These experiences can be engaging; support learning in other areas, such as science and mathematics; and provide a window into the important role of engineering in society. As the landscape of K-12 engineering education continues to grow and evolve, educators, administrators, and policy makers should consider the capacity of the US education system to meet current and anticipated needs for K-12 teachers of engineering.

Building Capacity for Teaching Engineering in K-12 Education reviews existing curricula and programs as well as related research to understand current and anticipated future needs for engineering-literate K-12 educators in the United States and determine how these needs might be addressed. Key topics in this report include the preparation of K-12 engineering educators, professional pathways for K-12 engineering educators, and the role of higher education in preparing engineering educators. This report proposes steps that stakeholders - including professional development providers, postsecondary preservice education programs, postsecondary engineering and engineering technology programs, formal and informal educator credentialing organizations, and the education and learning sciences research communities - might take to increase the number, skill level, and confidence of K-12 teachers of engineering in the United States.

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