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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Manipulating Quantum Systems: An Assessment of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25613.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Manipulating Quantum Systems: An Assessment of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25613.
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Page 215
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Manipulating Quantum Systems: An Assessment of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25613.
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Page 216
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Manipulating Quantum Systems: An Assessment of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25613.
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Page 217

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D Committee Biographical Information JUN YE, Co-Chair, is currently a Fellow of JILA and a Fellow of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and a Physics Professor Adjoint at the University of Colorado, Boulder. At JILA, Dr. Ye’s research focuses on the frontiers of light-matter interactions and includes precision measurement, quantum physics, ultracold matter, optical frequency metrology, and ultrafast science. Dr. Ye is a member of the NAS and a recipient of many awards and honors, including the N. Ramsey Prize (APS), I. I. Rabi Award (IEEE), U.S. Presidential Rank (Distinguished) Award, four Gold Medals from the U.S. Commerce Department, Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Frew Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, I. I. Rabi Prize of the American Physical Society, European Frequency and Time Forum Award, Carl Zeiss Research Award, William F. Meggers Award and Adolph Lomb Medal from the Optical Society of America, Arthur S. Flemming Award, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Friedrich Wilhem Bessel Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Samuel Wesley Stratton Award, and Jacob Rabinow Award from NIST. Dr. Ye earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Colorado in 1997. He served as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). NERGIS MAVALVALA, Co-Chair, is the Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Mavalvala is working on the detection of gravitational waves and quantum measurement science. She is a longtime member of the scientific team that announced in 2016 the first direct detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In the quest for ever greater sensitivity in the LIGO detectors, Dr. Mavalvala has also conducted pioneering experiments on generation and application of exotic quantum states of light, and on laser cooling and trapping of macroscopic objects to enable observation of quantum phenomena, which usually manifest at the atomic scale, in human-scale systems. Dr. Mavalvala received a B.A. from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. from MIT. She was a postdoctoral fellow and research scientist at the California Institute of Technology before joining the Physics faculty at MIT in 2002. She was appointed associate department head of physics in February 2015. Dr. Mavalvala is recipient of numerous honors, including a MacArthur “genius” award in 2010 and election to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2017. RAY BEAUSOLEIL is the HPE Senior Fellow for Information and Quantum Systems at Hewlett Packard Laboratories. Dr. Beausoleil leads the Large-Scale Integrated Photonics Research Group at Hewlett Packard Labs, where he is responsible for research on the applications of optics at the micro/nanoscale to high-performance classical and quantum information processing. Dr. Beausoleil’s research interests include solid-state laser physics, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, quantum information science and technology, nanophotonics, embedded computer algorithms, and image processing. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. PATRICIA M. DEHMER is the former deputy director for science programs in the Office of Science (SC) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the former director of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) within SC. As the deputy director, Dr. Dehmer was the senior career science official in SC and was the acting director between Senate-confirmed Presidential appointees, most recently for 3 years from 2013 to 2015. As director of the BES Program, she was known for her broad support of physical science research and for the planning, design, and construction phases of a dozen major scientific PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION D-1

construction projects totaling more than $3 billion. Previously, Dr. Dehmer was a distinguished fellow at Argonne National Laboratory with research activities in atomic, molecular, optical, and chemical physics. Since her retirement from federal service in 2016, she works as a management consultant with additional service on boards, science advisory committees, and professional society committees. During her federal service, Dr. Dehmer was awarded three Presidential Rank Awards and, in 2016, the James R. Schlesinger Award, the highest recognition in DOE, for management of SC’s portfolio in the physical sciences and for outstanding management of DOE’s largest-scale scientific construction projects. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Dehmer earned her Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Chicago. She served on and was vice chair of the Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). LOUIS DIMAURO is the Edward E. and Sylvia Hagenlocker Chair of Physics at the Ohio State University (OSU). Before joining OSU in 2007, Dr. DiMauro was a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. DiMauro’s research interest is in experimental ultrafast and strong-field physics. His current work is focused on the generation, measurement, and application of attosecond X-ray pulses and the study of fundamental scaling of strong-field physics. Dr. DiMauro received his B.A. (1975) from Hunter College, CUNY, and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1980. He was a postdoctoral fellow at SUNY at Stony Brook before arriving at AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1981. METTE GAARDE is the Les and Dot Broussard Alumni Professor of Physics at Louisiana State University (LSU). Dr. Gaarde is an expert on the theory of ultrafast and strong-field laser-matter interactions in atomic, molecular, and solid systems. In particular, she is interested in the interplay between the microscopic (quantum) effects and the macroscopic (classical) effects that govern this interaction. Dr. Gaarde recently served on CAMOS, on the executive committee for the APS Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP), and in the chair-line of the APS National Organizing Committee for the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics. Dr. Gaarde earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from Copenhagen University, Denmark, and was a research assistant professor at Lund University in Sweden before coming to LSU. STEVEN GIRVIN is a Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Yale University. Dr. Girvin is a theoretical physicist who studies the quantum mechanics of large collections of atoms, molecules, and electrons such as are found in superconductors, magnets, and transistors. Dr. Girvin is interested in quantum many-body physics and in quantum and classical phase transitions, particularly in disordered systems. Much of his work has been on the quantum Hall effect, but he has also worked on the superconductor-insulator transition, the vortex glass transition in high-Tc superconductors, superfluid helium in fractal aerogel, the Anderson localization problem, the Coulomb blockade problem in mesoscopic device physics, and on quantum spin chains. Dr. Girvin is a member of the NAS. He received his Ph.D. in 1977 from Princeton University. CHRIS H. GREENE is a professor of physics at Purdue University. Previously, Dr. Greene was at Louisiana State University and the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research concentrates on theoretical atomic, molecular, and optical physics. Dr. Greene’s expertise has been on novel treatments of few-body quantum systems, such as universal Efimov physics, ultra-long-range “trilobite” Rydberg molecules, collisions in Bose-Einstein condensates, atomic/molecular collision, and photo-absorption processes. He has served in the past as chair of JILA at the University of Colorado. Dr. Greene received his Ph.D. in theoretical atomic physics from the University of Chicago in 1980. In 1981, he was a postdoctoral research associate at Stanford University. TAEKJIP HA is Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Ha is also an Investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Ha’s research is focused on pushing the limits of single-molecule detection methods to study complex PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION D-2

biological systems. His group develops state-of-the-art biophysical techniques and applies them to study diverse protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes, and mechanical perturbation and response of these systems both in vitro and in vivo. Dr. Ha is a member of the NAS. He received his B.S. (1990) from Seoul National University and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley (1996), in physics. MARK KASEVICH is a professor of applied physics at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford University, Dr. Kasevich was at Yale University. His research interests are centered on the development of quantum sensors of rotation and acceleration based on cold atoms (quantum metrology), the application of these sensors to the tests of General relativity, the investigation of many-body quantum effects in Bose- condensed vapors (including quantum simulation), and the investigation of ultrafast laser-induced phenomena. Dr. Kasevich graduated from Dartmouth College in 1985 with a B.A. in physics and received his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University in 1992. MICHAL LIPSON is the Eugene Higgins Professor in Electrical Engineering and a professor of applied physics at Columbia University. Prior to joining Columbia University, Dr. Lipson was the Given Foundation Professor of Engineering at Cornell University. Her research interests are in silicon photonics, invention of the GHz silicon modulator, novel on-chip nanophotonics devices, and novel micron-size photonic structures for light manipulation. In 2014, Dr. Lipson was named by Thomson Reuters as a top 1 percent highly cited researcher in the field of physics. She completed her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology), followed by a postdoctoral position at MIT in the Materials Science Department until 2001. MIKHAIL LUKIN is a professor of physics at Harvard University, where he is also a co-director of the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms. Dr. Lukin’s research interests include quantum optics, quantum control of atomic and nanoscale solid-state systems, quantum metrology, nanophotonics, and quantum information science. He has co-authored over 300 technical papers and has received a number of awards, including the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the NSF Career Award, the Adolph Lomb Medal of the Optical Society of America, the AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the APS I.I.Rabi Prize, the Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship, the Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics, and the Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. Dr. Lukin is a member of the NAS. He received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 1998. A. MARJATTA LYYRA is a professor of physics at Temple University. Prior to joining Temple University, Dr. Lyyra was a research scientist at the University of Iowa. Her field of interest is experimental atomic, molecular, and optical physics with an emphasis on high resolution spectroscopy, quantum optics, and chemical dynamics using the "dressed states" tool of Autler-Townes splittings to manipulate molecular dynamics. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a Fellow of the Optical Society of America. Dr. Lyyra received her B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Helsinki, Finland (1972, 1974), and her Ph.D. from the University of Stockholm, Sweden, in 1979. PETER J. REYNOLDS is a senior research scientist with the Army Research Office (ARO) and an Adjunct Professor of Physics at North Carolina State University. He serves as a scientific advisor across the Army, helping to set research directions, particularly in the physical sciences, and seeks out emerging areas for investment both intra- and extramurally. Prior to this he served as the Head of Physics at ARO, and before that as Program Manager for Atomic & Molecular Physics. Prior to joining ARO, Dr. Reynolds was at the Office of Naval Research running the Atomic & Molecular Physics program there from 1988-2003. From 1979- 2003 he was a Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. His background is computational and theoretical physics approaches in statistical mechanics, particularly in renormalization group theory and Monte Carlo methods for both classical and quantum systems. He has received the U.S. Presidential Rank Award as a Distinguished Senior Scientist in 2015, and is a long-time Fellow of the American Physical Society. Dr. Reynolds obtained his Ph.D. in theoretical condensed- PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION D-3

matter physics from MIT in 1979 and an A.B. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1971. MARIANNA SAFRONOVA is a professor of physics at the University of Delaware and an adjunct fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute, NIST, and the University of Maryland. Dr. Safronova is currently the chair-elect of the American Physical Society Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) and a member of the Physical Review-A editorial board (2012-2018). Her diverse research interests include the study of fundamental symmetries and the search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles and fundamental interactions; development of high-precision methodologies for calculating atomic properties and exploring their applications; atomic clocks, ultracold atoms, and quantum information; long-range interactions; superheavy atoms; highlycharged ions; atomic anions; and other topics. In 2001, Dr. Safronova received her Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame. PETER ZOLLER is a professor of physics at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, and Scientific Director for the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Zoller’s interest and expertise are in the field of theoretical quantum optics, in particular the description of interaction of light with matter, and various aspects of quantum noise. During the last 10 years, the focus of his work has been on the interface between quantum optics and quantum information, and condensed matter physics with cold atoms. Dr. Zoller is a member of the NAS and received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Innsbruck. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION D-4

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The field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science underpins many technologies and continues to progress at an exciting pace for both scientific discoveries and technological innovations. AMO physics studies the fundamental building blocks of functioning matter to help advance the understanding of the universe. It is a foundational discipline within the physical sciences, relating to atoms and their constituents, to molecules, and to light at the quantum level. AMO physics combines fundamental research with practical application, coupling fundamental scientific discovery to rapidly evolving technological advances, innovation and commercialization. Due to the wide-reaching intellectual, societal, and economical impact of AMO, it is important to review recent advances and future opportunities in AMO physics.

Manipulating Quantum Systems: An Assessment of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics in the United States assesses opportunities in AMO science and technology over the coming decade. Key topics in this report include tools made of light; emerging phenomena from few- to many-body systems; the foundations of quantum information science and technologies; quantum dynamics in the time and frequency domains; precision and the nature of the universe, and the broader impact of AMO science.

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