National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

Estimating the Prevalence of

Human Trafficking

in the United States

CONSIDERATIONS AND COMPLEXITIES

PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP

Jordyn White, Rapporteur

Committee on National Statistics and Committee on Population

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

images

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, DC
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

This activity was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Contract No. HHSP233201400020B/Sponsor Award No. HHSP23337078. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-49959-0
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-49959-3
Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/25614

Additional copies of this publication are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu.

Copyright 2020 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested citation: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2020). Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25614.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

Image

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson is president.

The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president.

The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine.

Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

Image

Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independent peer-review process and it represents the position of the National Academies on the statement of task.

Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine chronicle the presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National Academies. The statements and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies.

For information about other products and activities of the National Academies, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

PLANNING COMMITTEE FOR THE WORKSHOP ON APPROACHES TO ESTIMATING THE PREVALENCE OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN THE UNITED STATES

DAVID BANKS (Chair), Duke University

ROY AHN, NORC at the University of Chicago

KATHERINE CHON, Office on Trafficking in Persons, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

DAVINA DURGANA, Walk Free Foundation and School of International Service, American University

MEGAN PRICE, Human Rights Data Analysis Group, San Francisco, CA

BERNARD SILVERMAN, University of Nottingham

SHELDON ZHANG, University of Massachusetts Lowell

JORDYN WHITE, Study Director

ELLIS GRIMES, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL STATISTICS

ROBERT M. GROVES (Chair), Department of Mathematics and Statistics and Department of Sociology, Georgetown University

ANNE C. CASE, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

JANET CURRIE, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

DONALD A. DILLMAN, Department of Sociology, Washington State University

DIANA FARRELL, JPMorgan Chase Institute, Washington, DC

ROBERT GOERGE, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

HILARY HOYNES, Goldman School of Public Policy and Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley

DANIEL KIFER, Department of Computer Science & Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University

SHARON LOHR, School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University (emerita)

THOMAS L. MESENBOURG, U.S. Census Bureau (retired)

SARAH M. NUSSER, Department of Statistics, Iowa State University

JEROME P. REITER, Department of Statistical Science, Duke University

JUDITH A. SELTZER, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles

C. MATTHEW SNIPP, School of the Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University

JEANNETTE WING, Data Science Institute and Computer Science Department, Columbia University

BRIAN HARRIS-KOJETIN, Director

CONSTANCE F. CITRO, Senior Scholar

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

COMMITTEE ON POPULATION

KATHLEEN MULLAN HARRIS (Chair), Department of Sociology, Carolina Population Center, and National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

DEBORAH BALK, Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, and CUNY Institute for Demographic Research, Baruch College of the City University of New York

NANCY BIRDSALL, Center for Global Development (president emeritus), Washington, DC

ANN K. BLANC, Social and Behavioral Science Research, Population Council, New York, NY

COURTNEY C. COILE, Department of Economics, Wellesley College

VICKI A. FREEDMAN, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan

DANA A. GLEI, Research Consultant, Georgetown University

ROBERT A. HUMMER, Department of Sociology, and Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

HEDWIG (HEDY) LEE, Department of Sociology, Washington University in St. Louis

JENNIFER J. MANLY, Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain, Department of Neurology, Columbia University

EMILIO A. PARRADO, Department of Sociology and Population Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania

ANNE R. PEBLEY, Department of Community Health Sciences, Department of Sociology, California Center for Population Research, Bixby Center on Population and Reproductive Health, University of California, Los Angeles

ISABEL V. SAWHILL, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC

REBECA WONG, Health Disparities, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

MALAY K. MAJMUNDAR, Director

MARY GHITELMAN, Senior Program Assistant

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

Acknowledgments

This Proceedings of a Workshop was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in making each published proceedings as sound as possible and to ensure that it meets the institutional standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process.

We thank the following individuals for their review of this proceedings: Hannabeth Franchino-Olsen, Maternal and Child Health, Gillings School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Megan Price, executive director, Human Rights Data Analysis Group, San Francisco, CA; and Katrina B. Stone, chief executive officer, Surveys & Behavior Analytics LLC, Washington, D.C.

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the content of the proceedings nor did they see the final draft before its release. The review of this proceedings was overseen by Roger Tourangeau, vice president and associate director, Westat, Inc. He was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this proceedings was carried out in accordance with standards of the National Academies and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content rests entirely with the rapporteur and the National Academies.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R1
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R2
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R3
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R4
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R5
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R6
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R7
Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R10
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R11
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25614.
×
Page R12
Next: 1 Introduction »
Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States: Considerations and Complexities: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $32.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Human trafficking has many names and can take many forms - pimp control, commercial sex, exploitation, forced labor, modern slavery, child labor, and several others - and the definitions vary greatly across countries and cultures, as well as among researchers. In the United States, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) is the cornerstone of counter-trafficking efforts. It provides guidance for identifying and defining human trafficking, and it authorizes legislation and appropriations for subsequent counter-trafficking measures both within and outside of the federal government. First enacted in 2000, the TVPA has since been reauthorized by three administrations, and it includes a directive for the President to establish an Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking. The subsequent Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act of 2018 also includes provisions for victim services and plans to enhance collaboration efforts to fight trafficking abroad.

To explore current and innovative sampling methods, technological approaches, and analytical strategies for estimating the prevalence of sex and labor trafficking in vulnerable populations, a 2-day public workshop, Approaches to Estimating the Prevalence of Human Trafficking in the United States, was held in Washington, D.C. in April 2019. The workshop brought together statisticians, survey methodologists, researchers, public health practitioners, and other experts who work closely with human trafficking data or with the survivors of trafficking. Participants addressed the current state of research on human trafficking, advancements in data collection, and gaps in the data. They discussed international practices and global trends in human trafficking prevalence estimation and considered ways in which collaborations across agencies and among the U.S. government and private-sector organizations have advanced counter-trafficking efforts. This proceedings summarizes the presentations and discussions of the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!