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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 6: Validation Tool." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Development of Transactional Data Specification for Demand-Responsive Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25619.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 6: Validation Tool." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Development of Transactional Data Specification for Demand-Responsive Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25619.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 6: Validation Tool." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Development of Transactional Data Specification for Demand-Responsive Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25619.
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Page 161

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159 Appendix 6: Validation Tool The research team developed a software tool hosted on a publicly accessible website that enables interested parties to test transactional data messages that could be transmitted among interacting software systems which manage demand responsive transportation services. These transactional data messages can be sent using either XML or JSON data structures, in accordance with the data specification that is included with this document (see Appendix 5). The website that hosts the data validation service is found at the following URL: http://tcrp.demandtrans.com This data validation service aims to provide interested parties with the following capabilities: (1) The ability to test the proposed data specification and identify any issues associated with either the specification or its implementation. (2) The ability to simulate how their software system could inter-operate with other software applications that manage demand responsive transportation services. In order to implement the transactional functionality of the data specification generated by this project, the research team has recommended a “control module” approach to data communication among software systems. This control module approach is briefly explained below. Each software system and device used by demand responsive transportation services will have its own internal data communication approach and protocols. When a software system needs to inter- operate with another software system, it will do so via an interface with an internal or external “data translator” that transforms its internal data messages and their elements into the common transactional data protocol. This data translator in essence performs the function of an internal/external API (application programming interface) for each technology system, enabling it to “speak” in the transactional language when it needs to communicate with other systems. The “control module” approach, which is shown in the following figure and also found in Chapter 4, ensures an element of centralized specification control without requiring a fully centralized translation broker approach. The control module is essentially a data specification validation service. The purpose of this software tool to enabled interested parties to test the proposed data specification. Any organization that uses this software tool will be emulating the process that the proposed transactional data specification approach will support. The control module approach necessitates that software systems using the specification be able to internally translate their transactional data into the message types and data elements of the proposed specification. To use the validation service tool described in this document, it is possible for interested parties to generate test data messages without actually modifying their software systems. However, the data that they transmit to this project’s data validation service will need to be translated—by whatever means is necessary—into the required form of the proposed transactional data specification.

160 Figure A5-5: Control Module Approach The website that hosts the data validation service is shown in Figure A5-6 below and can found at the following URL: http://tcrp.demandtrans.com Figure A5-6: Screenshot of Website with the Transactional Data Specification Validator

161 The following is a sample piece of XML that could be sent to the validation service: <tripTask xmlns="http://www.tcrp.gov/schema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"> <tripTaskId>tripTaskId0</tripTaskId> <tripTicketId>tripTicketId0</tripTicketId> <customerLocInDropoffSequence>10</customerLocInDropoffSequence> <nodeAddress> </nodeAddress> <nodeScheduledTime time="2016-05-04T18:13:51.0"/> </tripTask> The following is a sample piece of JSON that could be sent to the validation service: { "tripTask": { "tripTaskId": "tripTaskId0", "tripTicketId": "tripTicketId0", "customerLocInDropoffSequence": "10", "nodeAddress": " ", "nodeScheduledTime": { "time": "2016-05-04T18:13:51.0" } } } A typical API call to this validation service would have the following format: [Http POST] http://tcrp.demandtrans.com/api/Validator/validate?schema={schema}&inputType={inpu tType}&input={input} Questions or concerns about the validator can be sent via email to roger.teal@demandtrans.com.

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In the current U.S. climate of on-demand transportation services, the development of transactional data specifications for demand-responsive transportation (DRT)—sometimes referred to as “on-demand services”—will help facilitate interaction between software systems that manage DRT services in the United States.

The TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program's TCRP Research Report 210: Development of Transactional Data Specification for Demand-Responsive Transportation documents the development of the new data specifications for DRT.

A primary purpose of a transactional data specification is to enable DRT services in the U.S. to more fully and easily participate in an era of “New Mobility” by facilitating interactions among the software systems that manage them. New mobility refers to a new generation of technology-enabled urban transportation services that include bike sharing, car sharing, electric scooters, and on-demand transportation services operated by both private-sector and public-sector entities, including Uber and Lyft as well as public transit agencies.

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