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Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25622.
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Appendix C Speaker and Planning Committee Biosketches SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES John R. Balmes, MD, received his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1976. After internal medicine training at Mount Sinai and after pulmonary subspecialty, occupational medicine, and research training at Yale, he joined the faculty of the University of Southern California in 1982. He joined the faculty at the University of California, San Francisco in 1986 and is currently professor and division chief of occupational and environmental medicine at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). His major academic activities include his research laboratory, several collaborative epidemiological research projects, various advisory and editorial committees, and direction of the clinical occupational/environmental medicine division at SFGH. Dr. Balmes’ laboratory, the Human Exposure Laboratory (HEL), has been studying the respiratory health effects of various air pollutants for the past 27 years. Recently, the HEL has been focusing on the airway inflammatory effects of ozone, secondhand tobacco smoke, and wood smoke. The HEL was the first group to demonstrate (a) histological evidence of ozone- induced airway injury and inflammation in human subjects, (b) that asthmatic subjects have greater inflammatory responses to ozone than normal subjects, (c) that ozone-induced inflammatory responses in normal subjects attenuate with short-term exposures on consecutive days in the lung, and (d) that asthmatic subjects recruit macrophages to the airways with consecutive-day exposures. The lab is currently studying the impact of a genetic polymorphism of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione-S-transferase M1 on the susceptibility of asthmatic subjects to ozone. The lab is also studying the relationship of acute airway inflammatory responses to acute cardiovascular responses after both ozone and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure. Dr. Balmes collaborates on several epidemiological projects that are run out of the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health where he is a professor of environmental health sciences. One such project is called the Children’s Health and Air Pollution Study (CHAPS). The overall specific goal of CHAPS is to assess the impact of air pollution on the health of children living in the San Joaquin Valley, including adverse effects on immune function that may increase the risk of asthma onset and exacerbation. A second project involves study of the effects of biomass smoke exposure on chronic respiratory health of children and adult women in rural Guatemala. A third line of research involves the effects of arsenic in drinking water on lung health in both Bangladesh and Chile. Yet another project involves the effect of chronic exposure to hydrogen sulfide on lung function in Rotorua, New Zealand. Howard Backer, MD, MPH, FACEP, is the director of the California Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA) where he leads the department in establishing and enforcing PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS C-1

C-2 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS standards for EMS personnel, coordinating with local EMS systems, overseeing the development of statewide care systems, and preparing for and responding to disasters. Dr. Backer previously served for 10 years at the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), where he held a variety of assignments including chief of the immunization branch and interim director and interim state health officer. From 2008 to 2011, Backer was associate secretary for emergency preparedness at the California Health and Human Services (CHHS) Agency, where he worked closely with EMSA, CDPH, the Department of Social Services, and other CHHS departments on plans to coordinate public health and medical disaster response as well as mass care and shelter issues. In that capacity, he served as consultant to the Ukrainian Ministry of Emergencies and was part of a delegation to Chile following the devastating 2010 earthquake there. He will continue to coordinate the development of Emergency Function 8 (Public Health and Medical) for the California State Emergency Plan. Prior to government service, Dr. Backer practiced emergency medicine full-time for 25 years in rural, urban, and suburban settings. He received a doctor of medicine from the University of California at San Francisco, a master of public health from the University of California, Berkeley, a bachelor of science from the University of Michigan, and is board certified in emergency medicine, preventive medicine, and public health. He continues to work clinical hours in urgent care at the UC Berkeley Student Health Center. Oscar Chavez is the assistant director of human services for the County of Sonoma. Prior to joining the county, Mr. Chavez served as executive director of the Community Action Partnership of Sonoma County, one of the largest community benefit organizations in Northern California. While living in Bakersfield, California, he was director of business support services and director of engagement and public relations for a large community-based organization. In his current capacity, Mr. Chavez oversees the county’s Upstream Investments Initiative—a policy framework designed to strengthen the community’s ability to implement evidence-informed practices and to shift funding toward prevention. He is also responsible for the Human Services Department’s planning, research, and evaluation functions, as well as community and client engagement. Mr. Chavez serves as board president of Latino Service Providers; chair of Sonoma County Community Development Commission; board member of Community Foundation Sonoma County; board co-chair of California Stewardship Network, a statewide effort to promote regional collaboration and stewardship; and as a steering committee member of Rise Together, a nine-county Bay Area initiative committed to ending poverty. In 2018, Mr. Chavez served as steering committee co-chair for the California Economic Summit, as statewide event that brought together a broad and diverse network of business, equity, environmental, and civic organizations to craft strategies to improve upward mobility, build more housing, create a strong workforce, and strengthen the state’s water sustainability. In 2016, Mr. Chavez was honored by Hispanics in Philanthropy, a network of nonprofits, corporations, foundations, and individuals dedicated to addressing poverty issues, identifying solutions, and mobilizing Latinx communities in the United States and Latin America. In 2012, he received the Sonoma County Jefferson Award and the North Bay Business Journal Non-Profit Leadership Award. In 2008, he was named one of the North Bay’s “40 Under 40” leaders by the North Bay Business Journal. Nicole Errett, PhD, MSPH, is a lecturer in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Her research interests and expertise are in the use of public policy to enhance health outcomes during and after disaster. Dr. Errett co-founded and co-directs the ColLABorative on Extreme Event Resilience (CEER), a PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-3 network of public health researchers, practitioners, and community scientists who collaborate to address real-world challenges that impact our communities’ resilience to disasters and the acute impacts of climate change. Her commitment to community-relevant, translatable research is grounded in nearly a decade of practical experience in public health and health care emergency preparedness and management. She previously served as the special assistant to the assistant secretary of preparedness and response at the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the policy and legislative director at the Baltimore City Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management, and the evaluation and assessment manager at the Northwest Healthcare Response Network. Dr. Errett holds a PhD in health and public policy, an MSPH in health policy, and a BA in public health studies from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. She completed postdoctoral training in coastal community resilience at the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning in Vancouver, BC. Dr. Errett is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Connections Scholar and a 2018 National Academies Gulf Research Program Early-Career Research Fellow. Genevieve Flores-Haro, MPA, serves as the associate director for the Mixteco/Indigena Community Organizing Project, a nonprofit serving Ventura County’s indigenous immigrant community. In this capacity, she oversees grant writing, donor development, and special events. In addition to supporting the organization’s policy priorities, she also supervises programs specific to health advocacy, mental health, and domestic violence, including 2 multi-year mixed- methods research studies. Ms. Flores-Haro received her bachelor’s degree in psychology and her master’s in public administration from the University of Southern California. She currently sits on the board of directors for Ventura County’s local LGBT organization Diversity Collective, and is a member-at-large for the Ventura County Women’s Political Council. In 2017 she was awarded the Ventura County Democratic Party’s Chris Lanier Community Activist Award. Her interests include community building, playing guitar, and traveling. She and her wife Sade live in Oxnard with their dog Nena. Stella Fogleman, RN, MSN/MPH, CNS, has been working for the Los Angeles (LA) County Department of Public Health for nearly 18 years. She is the director of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Division (EPRD), and leads readiness activities to prepare for emerging threats and natural disasters as well as acts of biological, radiological, and chemical terrorism. The EPRD encompasses several important areas including threat assessment, policy and planning, community resilience, emergency operations, and finance and administration. Ms. Fogleman began her professional career as a pediatric staff nurse at Miller Children’s Hospital in Long Beach, then went to LA County as a district public health nurse at the Hollywood-Wilshire Health Center. From there, she was promoted to assistant program specialist at the Toxics Epidemiology Program, where she worked with an interdisciplinary team to assess patterns of disease related to toxic agent exposures throughout LA County. Prior to her current role, Ms. Fogleman was the director of EPRD’s Community Resilience Unit, aimed at increasing community preparedness and resilience among LA County populations. She received her BSN, MSN, and MPH at Cal State University, Long Beach, where she also received her certification as a clinical nurse specialist in community health. Don Hankins, PhD, is a professor of geography and planning at California State University, Chico. He has a BS in wildlife, fish, and conservation biology and a PhD in geography from the PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-4 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS University of California, Davis. His interests and expertise are in the following areas: pyrogeography, ecohydrology, landscape ecology, intervention ecology, conservation, environmental policy, and indigenous stewardship. Dr. Hankins has been involved in various aspects of environmental planning, stewardship, conservation, and regulation for a variety of organizations and agencies including federal and tribal governments. Drawing from his academic and cultural knowledge, he is particularly interested in indigenous traditional knowledge and policy and their application as a keystone process to aid in conservation and stewardship. He has published several articles specific to indigenous-prescribed fire and the social dynamics of colonization on cultural burning. Among other projects, his current research includes longitudinal studies of fire effects on biodiversity, cultural resources, and hydrology and overall environmental resiliency in riparian forests, oak woodlands, and meadows in California and in Eucalypt and tea tree woodlands in the Cape York Peninsula, Australia. These projects involve working with local indigenous communities in the respective areas in order to achieve a broader framework of collaborative stewardship and learning. Dr. Hankins has also been active in policy related to indigenous stewardship, particularly as related to fire and water management. Benjamin Houlton, PhD, studied chemistry (BS) and environmental engineering (MS) before receiving his doctorate in ecology and evolutionary biology from Princeton University in 2005. He then spent 2 years working as a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University and at the Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology, where he also forged collaborations with CSIRO’s Division of Marine and Atmospheric Research in Australia. Currently, a professor of global environmental studies at the University of California, Davis, Dr. Houlton holds the distinction of Chancellor’s Fellow and was recently appointed director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment. Dr. Houlton’s research interests include ecosystem processes, climate change, and the growing risks of human alterations to the global carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles for enhanced energy and food production. At the John Muir Institute of the Environment, he catalyzes research discovery across more than 300 faculty experts from all of UC Davis’s colleges and professional schools with the goal of devising innovative solutions to the environmental sustainability challenges of the 21st century. Most recently, Dr. Houlton has been spear-heading the new “OneClimate” initiative, which envisions an interdisciplinary, team-based approach to reducing greenhouse gas pollution and helping people and ecosystems adapt to an uncertain climate future. Dr. Houlton’s research has appeared in leading scientific journals such as Science, Nature, Nature Climate Change, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and has been covered by news media including Newsweek, The New York Times, Scientific American, The Christian Science Monitor, Discovery News, MSNBC/Today, and the BBC’s The Naked Scientists. He has appeared as a guest on NPR’s Morning Edition, MSNBC’s All In with Chris Hayes, and local TV and radio shows. Irva Hertz-Picciotto, PhD, is director of the National Institute of Health (NIH) funded UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) Center; and professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, UC Davis. She is an internationally renowned environmental epidemiologist with more than 300 scientific publications addressing environmental exposures to substances that include metals, pesticides, air pollutants, and endocrine disruptors; their interactions with nutrition, social factors, and genetics; and their influences on pregnancy, the newborn, and child development. Over the past 15 years, she has built a comprehensive research program on the environmental causes for autism, which has PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-5 produced seminal papers on the links with pesticides, traffic-related air pollution, low periconceptional folic acid intake, and untreated fever during pregnancy. The EHS Center that she directs fosters collaborations across disciplines as diverse as molecular biology, public health, pulmonology, engineering, chemistry, and sociology to identify key drivers of environmentally induced disease and disability, and the center partners with government agencies and community organizations to develop interventions that can reduce harmful exposures and improve health. Dr. Hertz-Picciotto has held appointments on numerous state and national advisory panels to organizations such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the NIH National Toxicology Program, the California Air Resources Board, and the California Proposition 65 Carcinogen Identification Committee. She chaired three National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Panels, mentored 75 pre- and postdoctoral trainees, taught epidemiologic methods on four continents, and in 2011 she received the Goldsmith Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. Recently she co-founded Project TENDR (Targeting Environment and Neuro- Developmental Risks), a collaborative effort of scientists, clinicians, policy makers and advocates that aims to decrease the incidence of neurodevelopmental disorders by reducing neurotoxicant exposures that contribute to them. Liane Jollon, RN, MA, earned her nursing degree in Durango, Colorado and joined San Juan Basin Public Health (SJBPH) as a clinic nurse in 2010, subsequently serving as a clinic manager and Health Services Division director. She was named the executive director of SJBPH in August 2013. Liane completed a master of arts in security studies from the Center for Homeland Defense and Security at the Naval Postgraduate School, where she is focused on equity in the emergency management field. A native New Yorker with a BA in history and sociology from Columbia University, Ms. Jollon worked in local and statewide nonprofits in Colorado for over 15 years prior to entering the field of public health. Her experiences range from delivering direct services to board positions and leadership roles. Many of these roles were focused on the health of children and families and addressed housing, violence prevention, economic development, and access to health care. In addition to working on local public health, Ms. Jollon’s recent roles include serving as a board member for organizations including federally qualified health centers and community mental health, the Denver Foundation’s Colorado Health Access Fund, the Colorado Association of Local Public Health Officials, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s Cancer, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disease Grants Program. Ms. Jollon was also named a member of The Aspen Institute’s inaugural class of the Colorado Children and Families Health and Human Services Fellowship. Megan Kurtz, MA, joins the Civic Engagement team for the Spring 2019 semester as a partnership between the Office of Civic Engagement (OCE) and the Office of the President at California State University, Chico. Ms. Kurtz is the Camp Fire–Campus Liasion. She worked in the TRIO program (a student support and outreach program) in Student Affairs for eleven years and is currently on the faculty in Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management. David Lubarsky, MD, MBA, is the vice chancellor of human health sciences and chief executive officer for UC Davis Health, a nationally ranked leader in health care education, research, and patient care. He oversees UC Davis Health’s academic, research, and clinical programs, including the School of Medicine, the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, the PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-6 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS 1,000-member physician practice group, and the UC Davis Medical Center, a 625-bed acute-care hospital. With roughly 14,000 employees, nearly 1,000 students, an annual operating budget of $3 billion, approximately $300 million in extramural research funding, and around one million outpatient visits each year, UC Davis Health is a major contributor to the health and economy of the Sacramento region and is a center of biomedical discoveries that help advance health around the world. Before joining UC, Davis, Dr. Lubarsky served for six years as the chief medical officer and systems integration officer at the University of Miami Health System (UHealth). He drove the largest annual growth (17 percent clinic visits, 26 percent procedures) in the history of the university, and positioned the $2 billion University of Miami hospital system for risk assumption. As senior associate dean for safety, quality, and risk prevention from 2007 to 2011, Dr. Lubarsky drove system malpractice costs down by 80 percent, saving $100 million annually. Committed to academics as well as leadership, he served from 2001 to 2018 as the Emanuel M. Papper Professor and Chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine, and Pain Management at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine, reinvigorating the largest anesthesia training program in the world, with 132 interns, residents, and fellows, and 60 student nurse anesthetists. In addition to covering a dozen operating room (OR) suites and more than 100,000 anesthetics annually, the department ran a heralded Center for Patient Safety dedicated to reducing patient harm through simulation and team training, which was hailed as one of the finest academic anesthesia training programs in the nation. Dr. Lubarsky also was a professor at the University of Miami’s School of Business, serving in both health sector policy and management and the Department of Management, and teaching population health, behavioral economics, physician behaviors, patient safety, negotiations, and incentive plans. From 1988 to 2001, Dr. Lubarsky was a tenured professor and vice chair of anesthesiology at Duke University, and he was adjunct professor at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business from 1999 to 2002. With more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and hundreds of invited lectures, Dr. Lubarsky is noted for his contributions to health care economics, informatics, and OR management, having published several articles defined as landmark contributions. Dr. Lubarsky earned his bachelor of arts in history (1980) and his medical degree (1984) at Washington University in St. Louis. He graduated in the first class of the university’s Scholars Program in Medicine. He completed an anesthesia residency and a fellowship in cardiovascular anesthesia and clinical research at New York University Medical Center. He received his MBA (1999) from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and was honored as a Fuqua Scholar, graduating at the top of his class. Byron R. Mason, MA, is the deputy director of the Administration for Children and Families’ (ACF’s) Office of Human Services Emergency Preparedness and Response (OHSEPR), which is responsible for leading disaster human services preparedness, response and recovery planning, and operations for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In this role, Mr. Mason is currently leading field operations to provide disaster case management services to disaster survivors in Butte County in response to the 2018 Camp Fire in Paradise, California. Prior to joining ACF, Mr. Mason was a member of HHS’ Division of Recovery where he served as the health and social services recovery field coordinator for federal interagency coordination and disaster recovery operations following Hurricanes Irma, Lane, Matthew, Michael, and Sandy, as well as Typhoon Dolphin and tornadoes in Kentucky, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Mr. Mason has also served as HHS’s recovery coordinator in response to the Flint water crisis. In 2018, Mr. Mason led the Human Services Branch to support the disaster human services recovery needs of PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-7 Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria. Prior to joining HHS, Mr. Mason worked in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) Public Assistance Directorate’s Regulations and Policy Branch and staffed the National Response Coordination Center as the Infrastructure Support Branch Director during the 2007 California wildfires, in advance of Hurricane Dolly, and following the 2009 tsunami in American Samoa. Mr. Mason led recovery field operations following the 2008 Cedar Rapids, Iowa flooding and after Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in Louisiana and Texas. In addition to leading field operations, he led the development of debris- management policies, guidance, training, and exercises. Prior to joining the federal government, Mr. Mason worked at the National Academy of Sciences. Mr. Mason earned a BA in anthropology at the University of Florida and an MA at The George Washington University. Andy Miller, MD, was raised in Chico, California, and attended California State University, Chico, where he graduated in instructional technology and computer science in 1989. He has worked as a computer consultant in Chicago and Seattle and as the director of a medical software company in San Francisco. He received his doctor of medicine degree from the University of California, San Diego, in 1999 and graduated from the University of California, Davis residency program in Redding in 2002. He is board certified in family practice and has been a fellow in the American Academy of Family Physicians since 2002. Dr. Miller spent 12 years as a UC Davis volunteer faculty member, teaching family practice residents in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Dr. Miller returned to Chico as a family practice physician with Northern Valley Indian Health (NVIH) beginning in 2002. He served as medical director for NVIH from 2008 until his departure in October of 2016 to take the position of Butte County public health officer. Lisa Miller, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. She is also the associate director of the California National Primate Research Center. Dr. Miller’s research program is focused on investigating the impact of environmental exposures (air pollution, allergens, microbes) on pulmonary and immune system development during the first year of life. She uses both cell-culture approaches and animal models to address questions related to mucosal immune mechanisms in pediatric populations, with an emphasis on understanding the etiology of childhood asthma and susceptibility to infectious disease. Michelle Medley-Daniel is deputy director of the Watershed Research and Training Center and director of the Fire Adapted Communities Network. A Hayfork local, she is proud to be contributing to the vitality of her home town through her work at the Watershed Center. She also works as the co-director of the Fire Adapted Communities Network. In this role, she works alongside partners at The Nature Conservancy to direct the operations of a national network of communities learning to live better with wildfire. In particular, Ms. Medley-Daniel’s focus is on working with state and regional efforts to launch network-based approaches to wildfire resilience. She has a background in studio art and English, and has over ten years of experience coordinating networks and providing communications and development services to nonprofits. Kathleen Navarro, PhD, MPH, is a forest planning specialist in the U.S. Forest Service and is qualified as a wildland firefighter. She has evaluated wildfire smoke exposure (particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) for the public and for wildland firefighters through direct monitoring at wildfires. Currently, she is using field-collected smoke PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-8 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS exposure measurements to estimate the risks of lung cancer and cardiovascular mortality for wildland firefighters. Dr. Navarro completed her PhD in the environmental health sciences at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health, where she also completed her MPH degree in 2011. Her dissertation combined traditional methods of exposure assessment with new approaches to evaluate exposures to air contaminants commonly emitted from wildfires in the ambient community and in occupational settings. She has a bachelor of science degree in environmental toxicology from UC Davis. Tina Palmieri, MD, FACS, FCCM, is assistant chief of burn surgery at Shriners Hospital for Children–Northern California, and director of the Firefighters Burn Institute Regional Burn Center, UC Davis Health. Dr. Palmieri treats patients with acute burn injury, inhalation injury, and soft-tissue disorders (toxic epidermal necrolysis, meningococcemia, traumatic tissue loss). The burn center treatment philosophy is a team approach: professionals from multiple disciplines (nursing, respiratory therapy, nutrition, occupational therapy, physical therapy, child life, psychologists, and pharmacists) working together to assure that each patient obtains the best outcome possible. Dr. Palmieri’s research focus is on the analysis of outcomes after burn injury, including both the immediate physical and long-term psychological effects of burn injury on patient quality of life. Dr. Palmieri is also director of the Burns Data Coordination Center at UC Davis. She has received funding from the Department of Defense to study the impact of limiting blood transfusions on both burn survival and infection rates. In addition, she studies how the body deals with acute burn stress (the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response) after burn injury and the long-term psychosocial impact of burn injury in both children and the elderly. Dr. Palmieri is one of the leaders of the Burn Multicenter Trials Group, which brings burn centers together to share information and to perform meaningful outcomes research. Dr. Palmieri is nationally and internationally known by her participation on the American Burn Association Board of Trustees and on the International Association of Fire Fighters Burn Foundation board of medical advisors. Ana Rappold, PhD, is a statistician with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. She is a scientific lead of the project that aims to integrate public health messaging with environmental models and to understand their effectiveness to reduce burden in populations. She has conducted a number of clinical and epidemiological research studies on health effects from air pollution and she has authored a number of studies specific to smoke impacts on health. Colleen Reid, PhD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder. Her research focuses on the health impacts of wildfire smoke exposure and how environmental and social exposures interact to influence health. Dr. Reid received her MPH and PhD in environmental health sciences from the University of California Berkeley, and did her postdoctoral training at Harvard University as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar. Heather Riden, MA, is the manager of the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety at the University of California, Davis. She has more than 15 years of experience in leadership roles advancing programs that advocate for the health of vulnerable populations. Currently, Ms. Riden’s focus is on the occupational health and the safety of the agricultural workforce. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-9 Annie Schmidt is a strategic advisor for the Washington State Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network as well as the public affairs officer for Chelan County Fire District 3 in Leavenworth, Washington. Ms. Schmidt has worked in the environmental field for the past 15 years (including 5 years as the director of the Chumstick Wildfire Stewardship Coalition). She is the coauthor of the National Forest Foundation publication “A Roadmap for Collaboration Before, During and After the NEPA Process,” which has been distributed to Forest Service units and collaborative groups across the nation. Ms. Schmidt is passionate about sharing fire-adapted communities (FAC’s) concepts and particularly enjoys teaching the Wildland Urban Interface: Fire Adapted Communities course at the National Fire Academy in Emmittsburg, Maryland. Ms. Schmidt’s other areas of interest include the integration of FAC principles into incident management team operations, the development of business wildfire resilience, and post-fire recovery. Her recent work includes assisting with the development of the Washington State Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. Merritt D. Schreiber, PhD, is a professor of clinical pediatrics at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center and at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is on staff in the Trauma Program at the Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC). Dr. Schreiber is mental health module coordinator for the European Master of Disaster Medicine Program. Dr. Schreiber also serves as subject matter expert for the Department of Homeland Security Interagency Advisory Board on first responder issues in terrorism and disaster response and for the FBI Victim Services Division Children and Mass Violence working group. Dr. Schreiber’s current work is focused on the development models of stepped continuum of mental health care health in mass casualty disasters, terrorism, and injury trauma for both adults and children in a public health context, and on enhancing disaster medical responder resilience to large and small events. Dr. Schreiber created the PsySTART Rapid Mental Health Triage and Incident Management System for rapid identification of at-risk victims and emergency responders in mass casualty events. He is the originator of a novel community resilience-focused psychological first aid program called “listen, protect, and connect.” He is also the developer of “anticipate, plan, and deter,” a disaster responder resilience system. Dr. Schreiber developed the National Children’s Disaster Mental Health Concept of Operations with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s Terrorism Disaster Center for use by cities, counties, and states to prepare and respond to the needs of children. Previously, Dr. Schreiber was reserve captain(O-6) in the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (USPHS). As a USPHS reserve officer, he was also activated to the emergency operations center for the Southeast Asian tsunami and Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Schreiber was deployed by the Department of Health and Human Services to the Sandy Hook school shooting and to the Boston Marathon bombing. He also trained medical teams for the USPHS Ebola response to Africa. Dr. Schreiber is a member of the California Disaster Mental Health Coalition and chair of the Disaster Response Network for the California Psychological Association. He is a member of the California Department of Health, Emergency Preparedness Office Advisory Committee. He received the California Psychological Association Distinguished Humanitarian Contribution Award and a presidential citation from the American Psychological Association for his work in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Dr. Schreiber received the Crisis Response Award, Outstanding Unit Citation and Special Commendation from the Surgeon General for his development of USPHS inaugural disaster response team training curricula. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-10 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS Dave Shew, BArch, is a consultant at Wildfire Defense Works, LLC and is a wildfire field representative with the National Fire Protection Association. Mr. Shew is recently retired from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. He has expertise in land use planning, community wildfire preparedness, structural resiliency, vegetation treatment projects, and mapping and data analysis. He received his bachelor of architecture degree from the University of Cincinnati. Lauren Thie, MSPH, is an environmental program consultant for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and serves as principal investigator for the Climate and Health Program cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ms. Thie earned her master of science in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health. Deborah Ward, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Dignity Health Dean’s Chair for Nursing Leadership, interim dean, and a clinical professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis. As the first faculty member recruited to the school in September 2008, Dr. Ward is a passionate advocate for the encouragement and advancement of her students, as well as for facilitating profound improvements in health and health care. Prior to this role, Dr. Ward served in a number of leadership positions including 2 years as chair of the Nursing Science and Health-Care Graduate Group and as associate dean for academics for the School of Nursing from 2009 to 2015. She played a critical role in the development of the school’s graduate degree programs, while she also worked diligently to connect the new school with the Davis campus as well as with the larger communities it serves. In 2017, Chancellor Gary S. May appointed her as a representative of UC Davis Health on the steering committee of the university’s strategic planning effort, “To Boldly Go.” Dr. Ward received her doctorate in health policy from Boston University in 1988 and a master of science in nursing from Yale University School of Nursing in 1977. She earned a bachelor of arts in government from Oberlin College in 1968. Dr. Ward secured grant funding for a variety of research and educational projects and is widely published, both in the United States and overseas, including in Health Affairs and Nursing Outlook. She has received numerous awards and honors, including the Rheba de Tornyay Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award and the Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching from the University of Washington School of Nursing, where she was an associate professor. She received the Distinguished Alumna Award from the Yale University School of Nursing and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. In 2010, she received the UC Davis School of Medicine Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Ward was most recently honored in 2018 with UC Davis’ James H. Meyer Distinguished Achievement Award. Andrew J. Whelton, PhD, MS, is an associate professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University. Dr. Whelton is passionate about conducting research to investigate and solve problems that affect our natural and built environments with expertise in polymer science, analytical chemistry, food science, and nanoengineering. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-11 PLANNING COMMITTEE BIOSKETCHES Kenneth W. Kizer, MD, MPH, (Chair) is the founding director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement and a Distinguished Professor in the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. He is an internationally respected health care leader whose diverse professional experience includes senior executive positions in the public and private sectors, academia, and philanthropy. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Public Administration. Dr. Kizer’s positions over the years have included founding president and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), National Quality Forum; chairman, CEO, and president, Medsphere Systems Corporation; Under Secretary for Health, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and CEO of the nation’s largest health care system; director, California Department of Health Services; and director, California Emergency Medical Services Authority, where he was the architect of the state’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system in the early 1980s. He has served on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and as chairman of The California Wellness Foundation, as well as on the governing boards of a number of managed care and health IT companies, foundations, professional associations and nonprofit organizations. He has been an advisor to numerous foreign countries on health-related matters. Dr. Kizer is an honors graduate of Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the recipient of two honorary doctorates, and a fellow or distinguished fellow of 12 professional societies. He is board certified in six medical specialties and/or subspecialties, and has authored over 500 original articles, book chapters, and other reports. He is a Fellow National of the international Explorer’s Club, a founding member and architect of the international Wilderness Medical Society, a former Navy diving medical officer, and a recognized expert on aquatic sports and wilderness medicine. He also worked as a firefighter for two years early in his career. His accomplishments have been recognized with dozens of awards, and he has been selected as one of the “100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare” by Modern Healthcare magazine on several occasions. His work has been featured in Time, BusinessWeek, Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and numerous other magazines, newspapers, and national television shows. Julie Baldwin, PhD, is the director of the Center for Health Equity Research and a professor of health sciences at Northern Arizona University. From 1994–2004, Dr. Baldwin served as a tenured faculty member at Northern Arizona University, with a joint appointment in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. She joined the faculty at the University of South Florida College of Public Health in the Department of Community and Family Health in 2005. She returned to Northern Arizona University in August 2015 to create the Center for Health Equity Research. Dr. Baldwin’s research over the years has focused on both infectious and chronic disease prevention. Cross-cutting themes that have characterized her work include utilizing community-based participatory research approaches, working with underserved and/or marginalized populations, and addressing health disparities by developing and implementing culturally competent public health interventions. As an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, she has made a life-long commitment to serving diverse communities and to advocating for health promotion programs for children, adolescents, and families. Dr. Baldwin PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-12 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS earned her doctorate in behavioral sciences and health education in 1991 from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Michelle Bell, PhD, MS, MSE, is the Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, with secondary appointments at the Yale School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Division and the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Science, Environmental Engineering Program. Her research investigates how human health is affected by atmospheric systems, including air pollution and weather. Other research interests include the health impacts of climate change and environmental justice. Much of this work is based in epidemiology, biostatistics, and environmental engineering. The research is designed to be policy relevant and to contribute to well-informed decision making to better protect human health and benefit society. She is the recipient of the Prince Albert II de Monaco/Institut Pasteur Award, the Rosenblith New Investigator Award, and the National Institute of Health Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) Award. Dr. Bell holds degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (BS in environmental engineering), Stanford University (MS in environmental engineering), and Johns Hopkins University (MSE in environmental management and economics and PhD in environmental engineering). Wayne E. Cascio, MD, FACC, FAHA, is director, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Over 24 years in academia at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at East Carolina University, he engaged in clinical, research, teaching, and health care administrative activities. Prior to joining the EPA in 2011, Dr. Cascio worked to increase access to cardiovascular health care in underserved rural areas, and served on EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee for Particulate Matter. While at EPA, Dr. Cascio has helped focus research activities of the Office of Research and Development on public health-relevant products. He has served as a leader in the agency’s research and public health guidance on the topic of wildfire smoke and health, and is a coauthor of the 2016 Wildfire Smoke: Guide for Public Health Officials. He now serves as EPA’s liaison to NCER-ATSDR’s Board of Scientific Counselors, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. Dr. Cascio has authored or co- authored more than 180 journal articles and book chapters. He is a recipient of a 2013 EPA Gold Medal for Exceptional Service, a 2013 Office of Research and Development Impact Award, American Public Health Association’s (APHA’s) 2018 Homer N. Calver Award, and numerous scientific and technological achievement awards. His current research includes the study of the health effects of environmental pollutants informing risk assessment, risk-management decisions, and improvement of public health and quality of life through increased environmental health communication and literacy. Dr. Cascio earned a BA from Johns Hopkins University and an MD from the University of Maryland. He completed clinical training in internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases at the University of North Carolina and postdoctoral training in electrophysiology at the Physiologisches Institut, Universität Bern, Switzerland. Dr. Cascio is a clinician-scientist and is board certified in internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. David Eisenman, MD, MSHS, is professor-in-residence at the David Geffen School of Medicine and at the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, where he is the director of the PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-13 Center for Public Health and Disasters. Dr. Eisenman’s training is in internal medicine, primary care, public health, and health services research. For more than 15 years, Dr. Eisenman has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Justice, U.S. Forest Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Homeland Security, the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. His research is focused on public health and disasters, climate change, refugee health, violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Recent studies investigated community resilience to disasters, the interactions of social factors and the built environment on heatwave mortality and morbidity, the mortality associated with wintertime extreme heat in Los Angeles, organizational networks in disasters, behavioral responses to wireless emergency alerts, wildfires and mental health, improving treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder in public safety-net clinics, and evaluating programs for preventing violent extremism. He has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed papers, chapters, and major reports related to disasters and emergencies. Dr. Eisenman has served on committees and expert panels for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; National Institute of Standards and Technology; National Institutes of Health; and national and international funding organizations. He was the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Preparedness Science Officer for the Emergency Preparedness and Response Program from 2012 to 2016. Dr. Eisenman is also an associate natural scientist at RAND, where he is a member of the human subjects protection committee. Dr. Eisenman is a credentialed physician for the Los Angeles County Emergency System for the Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals Program. He holds a board certification in internal medicine and cares for patients at the UCLA Medical Center. Dr. Eisenman earned his BA from the University of Pennsylvania, his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and his MSHS from the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA. Richard J. Jackson, MD, MPH, Hon. AIA, Hon. ASLA, was most recently professor and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. A pediatrician, he has served in many leadership positions in both environmental health and infectious disease with the California Health Department, including the highest as the State Health Officer. For 9 years, Dr. Jackson was Director of the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC’s) National Center for Environmental Health in Atlanta and received the Presidential Distinguished Service award. While in California, he helped establish the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program and state and national laws to reduce risks from pesticides, especially to farm workers and to children. While at CDC he established the national asthma epidemiology and control program, oversaw the childhood lead poisoning prevention program, and instituted the federal effort to “biomonitor” chemical levels in the U.S. population. Dr. Jackson has received the Breast Cancer Fund’s Hero Award, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Public Health Law Association, and the New Partners for Smart Growth. In October 2012, he received the John Heinz Award for Leadership in the Environment. Dr. Jackson lectures and speaks on many issues, particularly those related to built environment and health. He co-authored two Island Press Books: Urban Sprawl and Public Health in 2004 and Making Healthy Places in 2011. He is host of a 2012 public television series Designing Healthy Communities, which links to the John Wiley & Sons book by the same name published in October 2011. He has served on many environmental and health boards, as well as the board of directors of the American Institute of Architects. He is an elected honorary member of both the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Landscape Architects. Dr. Jackson PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-14 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS earned his MD from the University of California, San Francisco, and his MPH from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Jackson is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Wayne B. Jonas, MD, is a practicing family physician, an expert in integrative health and health care delivery, and a widely published scientific investigator. Dr. Jonas is the executive director of Samueli Integrative Health Programs, an effort supported by Henry and Susan Samueli to increase awareness of and access to integrative health. Additionally, Dr. Jonas is a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army. From 2001 to 2016, he was president and chief executive officer of the Samueli Institute, a nonprofit medical research organization supporting the scientific investigation of healing processes in the areas of stress, pain, and resilience. Dr. Jonas was the director of the Office of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1995 to 1999, and prior to that served as the director of the Medical Research Fellowship at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Jonas has led and participated in hundreds of research studies beginning with his time as director of the NIH’s Office of Alternative Medicine. While serving as Chief Executive Officer and president of the nonprofit research organization Samueli Institute, his work set the bar for evidence-based research in the areas of pain, stress, and human performance. Dr. Jonas’s new book, How Healing Works, was published in January 2018 by Ten Speed Press. His research has appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, Nature Medicine, the Journal of Family Practice, the Annals of Internal Medicine, and The Lancet. Dr. Jonas received the 2015 Pioneer Award from the Integrative Healthcare Symposium, the 2007 America’s Top Family Doctors Award, the 2003 Pioneer Award from the American Holistic Medical Association, the 2002 Physician Recognition Award of the American Medical Association, and the 2002 Meritorious Activity Prize from the International Society of Life Information Science in Chiba, Japan. Suzet M. McKinney, DrPH, MPH, is Chief Executive Officer/executive director of the Illinois Medical District, one of the largest urban medical districts in the United States. Dr. McKinney is the former deputy commissioner of the Bureau of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Response at the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH), where she oversaw the emergency preparedness efforts for the department and coordinated those efforts within the larger spectrum of the City of Chicago’s public safety activities, in addition to overseeing the department’s Division of Women and Children’s Health. Dr. McKinney previously served as the senior advisor for public health and preparedness at the Tauri Group, where she provided strategic and analytical consulting services to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) BioWatch Program. Her work at DHS included providing creative, responsive, and operationally based problem solving for public health, emergency management, and homeland security issues, specifically chemical and biological early detection systems and the implementation of those systems at the state and local levels. Dr. McKinney serves on numerous boards, committees, and advisory boards, including the board of directors for Susan G. Komen Chicago, Thresholds, and the Fifth Third Bank advisory board. Dr. McKinney is co-chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division’s Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies and is a member of the National Academies’ Board PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX C C-15 on Health Sciences Policy. She also serves on the Science and Security Board for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, the Board of Scientific Counselors for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, as well as on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council. She has served as an incident commander for CDPH and was a member of Chicago’s incident management team. She has been responsible for leading multiple emergency response efforts, including Chicago’s 2014–2015 Ebola response; the operational response to the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, which was successful in vaccinating nearly 100,000 residents over a 6-week timeframe; as well as CDPH’s participation in the 2012 NATO summit response and the 2010 Haiti earthquake response. Dr. McKinney has earned a reputation as an experienced, knowledgeable public health official with exceptional communication skills. She has served as an on-camera media expert on emergency issues including biological and chemical threats, natural disasters, pandemic influenza, and climate-related emergencies. A sought-after expert in her field, she has also provided support to the Department of Defense’s Defense Threat Reduction Agency, lending subject-matter expertise in biological terrorism preparedness to the country of Poland. In academia, Dr. McKinney serves as an instructor in the Division of Translational Policy and Leadership Development at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and as adjunct assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Additionally, she serves as a mentor for the Biomedical Sciences Careers Project, also at Harvard University. She is the co-author of the new text Public Health Emergency Preparedness: Practical Solutions for the Real World (2018), and was named one of Chicago’s Notable Women in Healthcare (2018). Dr. McKinney holds her doctorate degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, with a focus on preparedness planning, leadership, and workforce development. She received her bachelor of arts in biology from Brandeis University, where she was also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow. She received her master of public health degree (health care administration) and certificates in managed care and health care administration from Benedictine University. Winston Wong, MD, MS, is medical director of community health and director of disparities improvement and quality initiatives at Kaiser Permanente. In this role, he is responsible for developing and cultivating partnerships with communities and agencies in advancing population management and evidence-based medicine, with a particular emphasis on safety-net providers and the elimination of health disparities. His background includes leadership roles in community health, government, and health plan delivery. From 1993 to 2003, Dr. Wong was a commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, serving as both the chief medical officer for the Health Resources and Services Administration, Region IX, and its director of California Operations. He achieved the rank of captain, and was awarded the Outstanding Service Medal from the Department of Health and Human Services. A board-certified family practitioner, and bilingual in Cantonese and Toisanese dialects, Dr. Wong continues a small clinical practice at Asian Health Services, a federally qualified health center in Oakland, California, where he served previously as medical director. Dr. Wong has served on a number of state and national advisory groups addressing issues in cultural competence, health care access, and improving health care for vulnerable populations. Dr. Wong co-chaired the National Quality Forum’s initiative for “Measuring and Reporting Cultural Competency” for health care organizations, and currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

C-16 IMPLICATIONS OF THE CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES FOR HEALTH, COMMUNITIES, AND PREPAREDNESS Roundtable on Health Literacy, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, and Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity. He is also chair of the National Council of Asian and Pacific Islander Physicians and board member on Grantmakers in Health, as well as the California Endowment. Dr. Wong earned his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and his master’s and undergraduate degrees at the University of California, Berkeley. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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California and other wildfire-prone western states have experienced a substantial increase in the number and intensity of wildfires in recent years. Wildlands and climate experts expect these trends to continue and quite likely to worsen in coming years. Wildfires and other disasters can be particularly devastating for vulnerable communities. Members of these communities tend to experience worse health outcomes from disasters, have fewer resources for responding and rebuilding, and receive less assistance from state, local, and federal agencies. Because burning wood releases particulate matter and other toxicants, the health effects of wildfires extend well beyond burns. In addition, deposition of toxicants in soil and water can result in chronic as well as acute exposures.

On June 4-5, 2019, four different entities within the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop titled Implications of the California Wildfires for Health, Communities, and Preparedness at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at the University of California, Davis. The workshop explored the population health, environmental health, emergency preparedness, and health equity consequences of increasingly strong and numerous wildfires, particularly in California. This publication is a summary of the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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