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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Symposium Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Population Health Science in the United States: Trends, Evidence, and Implications for Policy: Proceedings of a Joint Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25631.
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Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Symposium Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Population Health Science in the United States: Trends, Evidence, and Implications for Policy: Proceedings of a Joint Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25631.
×
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Symposium Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Population Health Science in the United States: Trends, Evidence, and Implications for Policy: Proceedings of a Joint Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25631.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Symposium Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Population Health Science in the United States: Trends, Evidence, and Implications for Policy: Proceedings of a Joint Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25631.
×
Page 54

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix B Symposium Agenda National Academy of Sciences Building Auditorium 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC SYMPOSIUM OBJECTIVES 1. Identify key trends and patterns in U.S. population health and pro- vocative challenges to our current thinking, including socioeconomic, gender, racial, ethnic, and other social disparities. 2. Explore how population health science can inform policy to improve outcomes and how policies can have unintended consequences if not grounded in research and evaluation. 3. Showcase perspectives on how we build common ground for devel- opment and implementation of effective policy based on science. 8:15 Welcome from the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS) and the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement Sanne Magnan, Senior Fellow, HealthPartners Institute, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota; Co-Chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement 51 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

52 POPULATION HEALTH SCIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES Bruce Link, Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Sociology, University of California, Riverside, and Emeritus Professor of Epidemiology and Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University 8:30 Population Health in the United States: The Stakes Are High Moderator: Robert Hummer, Howard W. Odum Professor of Sociology, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, and Co-Chair, IAPHS Annual Meeting Program Committee Speakers: Eileen Crimmins, AARP Professor of Gerontology, Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California David Williams, Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health, Professor of African and African American Studies and Sociology; Co-Leader, Cancer Risk and Disparities Program, Dana-Farber/ Harvard Cancer Center, Harvard University 9:45 Break 10:00 Policy-Relevant Evidence for Population Health: Promise and Challenges Moderator: Allison Aiello, Professor of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Speaker: Sandro Galea, Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, School of Public Health, Boston University Discussants: Jennifer Doleac, Associate Professor of Economics, Texas A&M University; Director, Justice Tech Lab Paula Lantz, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Professor of Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan 11:15 Break PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 53 11:30 Effective Population Health Policy and the Science: Finding Common Ground Moderator: Josh Sharfstein, Vice Dean, Public Health Practice and Training, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Speakers: Joneigh S. Khaldun, Director and Health Officer, City of Detroit Health Department Ellen Marie Whelan, Chief Population Health Officer, Center for Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Plan Services, Senior Advisor, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Rahul Gupta, State Health Officer and Commissioner, Department of Health & Human Resources Bureau for Public Health, West Virginia 12:45 Closing Remarks David Kindig, Emeritus Co-Chair, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement; Emeritus Professor of Population Health Sciences and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor for Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin–Madison 1:00 Adjourn and Transition to IAPHS Annual Meeting PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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On October 3, 2018, the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science convened a joint symposium in Washington, DC to consider the current state of population health science in the United States. At the symposium, speakers and participants reviewed the status of population health in the United States, including current trends in health and mortality, and racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities; explored the complexities of policy implementation with attention to evidence generation and to surfacing and mitigating negative unintended consequences of policies for population health; and shared perspectives on finding common ground to move population health forward. This publication summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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