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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Case Examples." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25643.
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68 Case examples of participants in the survey include descriptions and details about what they offer. Table 2 lists the case examples in this chapter alphabetically by high school and then alphabetically by community college. Case Example 1: Atlantic County Schools, Atlantic City, NJ In Atlantic City, home to the FAA Tech Center, Atlantic County has partnered with ERAU and Atlantic Cape Community College to develop a new Aviation Maintenance and Technical Academy. This partnership was enabled via a $120,000 Innovative Challenge grant from the New Jersey Economic Development Authority. According to the announcement, A key goal of the proposed Atlantic County academy is to help broaden and diversify the regional economy to facilitate development of an aviation economic hub centered around the FAA Tech Center, the Atlantic City Airport and the National Aviation Research and Technology Park. (Auble, 2018, para. 5) In the future, additional aviation pathways may be offered, depending on industry needs and available college resources. Case Example 2: Aviation High School, Long Island, NY Aviation High School was founded in October of 1925, initially as a part of a conglomerate of trade schools. The program was further refined in the 1930s with a focus on the construction and maintenance of aircraft, offering instruction on subjects such as wiring and carpentry. In 1945, the academy began to include a college preparatory program for engineering, continuing its focus on maintenance and production. In the 1950s, the school moved to a new facility that spanned an entire city block and included a 10,000-sq-ft hangar, 15,000-sq-ft apron, and space for up to 2,000 students; this facility is where the program resides today. In 1993, the program added a five-year program that allowed for its students to complete their FAA airframe and powerplant licensing. The school has an annex at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, where some seniors are paired up with a technician or an engineer at a participating air- line for a hands-on internship. Nearly 100% of these students are offered jobs upon graduation. Today the program continues to offer courses in maintenance, aerodynamics, engineering, and electronics and has developed strong bonds with the military, industry leaders, and universities across the nation. Aviation High School has not only been recognized by the New York Depart- ment of Education, but has also been listed as one of the best high schools in the United States by US News. It has the distinction of producing more A&Ps than any other program in the nation (NBAA, 2018d; Aviation High School, n.d.) C H A P T E R 5 Case Examples

Case Examples 69 Case Example Organization Location Type Case Example 1 Atlantic County Schools Atlantic City, NJ High school Case Example 2 Aviation High School Long Island, NY High school Case Example 3 Clearwater High School Aeronautics Academy Clearwater, FL High school Case Example 4 Corona High School Corona, CA High school Case Example 5 Davis Aerospace and Maritime High School Cleveland, OH High school Case Example 6 Denbigh High School Aviation Academy Newport News, VA High school Case Example 7 McKinney ISD Aviation Program McKinney, TX High school Case Example 8 Raisbeck Aviation High School Tukwila, WA High school Case Example 9 Ross Shaw Sterling Aviation High School Houston, TX High school Case Example 10 Seminole County Public Schools Sanford, FL High school Case Example 11 Sisters High School Sisters, OR High school Case Example 12 Tampa Bay Regional Aeronautics Academy Tampa, FL High school Case Example 13 Wichita Public Schools Aviation Pathway Wichita, KS High school Case Example 14 Aims Community College Greeley, CO Community college Case Example 15 Colorado Northwestern Community College Rangely, CO Community college Case Example 16 East Valley Institute of Technology Mesa, AZ Community college Case Example 17 Aviation Community Foundation Broomfield, CO NGO Case Example 18 North Texas Aviation Education Initiative North Texas NGO Case Example 19 Atlanta Airport University Atlanta, GA Airport Case Example 20 Clark County Department of Aviation Las Vegas, NV Airport Case Example 21 Erie Regional Airport Authority Erie, PA Airport Case Example 22 Glacier Park International Airport Kalispell, MT Airport Case Example 23 Jacksonville Aviation Authority Jacksonville, FL Airport Case Example 24 Riverside Municipal Airport Riverside, CA Airport Table 2. Case examples.

70 Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges Case Example 3: Clearwater High School Aeronautical Space Academy, Clearwater, FL Clearwater High School Aeronautical Space Academy (CASA) was opened to students in the 2014–2015 school year, with a “soft launch” having occurred in 2014 to test interest and enroll- ment. This program offers coursework in the areas of unmanned and manned flight, along with unique courses in space flight and systems. Flight training is conducted solely in simulators and is accompanied by ground instruction. CASA is open to all students at Clearwater, as well as select applicants from high schools in the area. Clearwater has established a partnership with ERAU that allows students to complete up to 30 units of university credit while completing their high school education. Currently only 10 units worth of courses are offered on Clearwater’s campus, with the other 20 requiring students to attend classes at ERAU’s Daytona Beach cam- pus, though Clearwater is working to offer more courses on its own campus. This partnership with ERAU was developed over several years, before the program’s opening, with the largest roadblock having been the lack of a faculty member at Clearwater who was qualified to teach the program. It is worth noting that ERAU has worked to establish programs similar to this one in other counties of Florida as well. “CASA is an excellent opportunity for our students to be fully engaged in a STEM program that will give students rigorous and relevant real-world applica- tions with college credit and an industry certification,” said Keith Mastorides, school principal (NBAA, 2018d; Dawson, 2013). Case Example 4: Corona High School, Corona-Norco USD, CA A new aviation pathway has been developed at Corona High School, as part of the Corona- Norco Unified School District in Southern California. The champion of the aviation program is Chris Peterson. Currently the Director of Bands at Corona High School, he holds the Certified Flight Instructor (CFI)/Certified Flight Instrument Instructor (CFII)/Multi-Engine Instructor (MEI) certificates. As is often the case, aviation pathways at the high school level are often championed by a current teacher who has some background in aviation. The Corona High School aviation program began in fall 2018. Each student receives a Jeppesen Part 61 Private Pilot kit that remains the property of the school. Students and the instructor have access to the King Schools Private Pilot online course for video material, as well as Sporty’s Private Pilot online course and Jeppesen online course to supplement comprehension of key concepts. The goal is for students to pass the FAA Private Pilot knowledge test. The school purchased a Redbird full motion FMX flight simulator, a stationary LD, 10 TD2 desktop simulators, and a Jay Velocity. The Jay Velocity is designed for easy transport for campus demonstrations and intermediate schools to generate interest in aviation and the Corona High School aviation pathway. Chris Peterson is plugging in to learn as much as possible about aviation pathway programs, to include attending the Redbird Migration and AOPA High School STEM Sympo- sium (personal communication, September 26, 2018). Case Example 5: Davis Aerospace and Maritime High School, Cleveland, OH Davis Aerospace and Maritime High School, part of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, is a unique partnership between the school district and PHASTAR Corporation. PHASTAR is a Northeast Ohio–based nonprofit corporation designed to improve the quality of education and public services in Northeast Ohio. The school district provides the core

Case Examples 71 curriculum and PHASTAR supplies the specialized aerospace and maritime curriculum, as well as industry learning opportunities for students. Uniquely combining two distinct career fields, Davis Aerospace and Maritime High School exists “To be a cutting-edge public high school for students who wish to pursue their curiosity or passion for aerospace and maritime in a supportive environment that prepares them for college, careers, and citizenship” (Davis Aerospace and Maritime, 2018a, para. 1). Rather than requiring students to choose one of these two paths, students “experience being in the air and at sea, with opportunities to fly planes, operate boats, swim, and provide rescue” (Davis Aerospace and Maritime, 2018b, para. 1). These oppor- tunities are provided by the Port of Cleveland, and in addition to the harbor terminals, enable students to experience aviation firsthand at Cleveland Hopkins Airport and Burke Lakefront Airport. This high school also offers a number of opportunities for the community to become involved, including assisting with (1) PHASTAR Task Force, (2) summer enrichment programs, (3) Discover Aviation Center, (4) Rise Above Exhibit, (5) student chaperoning, (6) guest speakers, (7) solicitations/fundraising, and (8) research. Case Example 6: Denbigh High School Aviation Academy, Newport News, VA The Aviation Academy at Denbigh High School is a well-established aviation program with a diverse offering of pathways. Students can take one of four pathways: aviation technology, flight operations, aerospace engineering, and aviation security and safety. The academy is offered as a magnet program with “courses offered on an ‘airport campus’ at Newport News/ Williamsburg Airport” (Smith, 2018). The program offers access to unique equipment such as its own wind tunnel, 3-D printers, and its own aircraft for its A&P program. This equip- ment has been procured over the course of several years through grants, donations from the community, and partnerships with entities such as NASA and Alcoa. As of 2018, the program consisted of more than 300 students ranging from freshmen to seniors. All students who participate in the program are offered shuttle bus transport between the main high school campus and the airport campus. Denbigh High School Aviation Academy has also entered into multiple dual-enrollment and articulation agreements with universities such as Liberty and Hampton universities, providing pathways for continuing education for their graduates. Case Example 7: McKinney ISD Aviation Program, McKinney, TX The McKinney ISD Aviation Program, now known as the McKinney Aviation Academy, was founded in 2011 with about 40 students. By 2013 the program had grown to more than 200 students with expanded course offerings. Currently, students receive training in aero- dynamics, design, and maintenance. Students are also provided ground training and are able to log 2.5 hours of flight training that is performed in the program’s FAA-approved Redbird Simulators. Academy students also experience a number of hands-on activities in their course- work, including simulated flights in multiple aircraft types. At the capstone of the program, students choose to focus on either flight preparation or maintenance training. McKinney Aviation Academy has seen significant support from American Airlines in the form of a full partnership and the receipt of $25,000 in grants from the airline. Graduates from this program continue on to receive higher education in all areas of the aviation industry (Mauldin, 2017; Mauldin 2018).

72 Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges Case Example 8: Raisbeck Aviation High School, Tukwila, WA Raisbeck Aviation High School (see Figure 43), part of the Highline School District, was first conceived in 2003. With 400 students, Raisbeck is unique. It is housed in a modern, 86,000-sq-ft purpose-built facility (competed in 2013) adjacent to the Museum of Flight. Students and instructors alike are proud of their airfoil-themed facility. With an open floor plan and flex spaces, mentor rooms, and a student common, teaching, learning, career prepara- tion, and community take place in innovative ways. With approximately 150 industry mentors, students are paired with an industry mentor during their sophomore year and interact with this mentor for the next three years until graduation. Students are encouraged to dream big with their mentors as they discuss career opportunities and college paths. The mission of Raisbeck is “To be the premier public high school of choice for students in King County and the region who wish to pursue their passion for aviation and aerospace in a learning envi ronment that prepares them for higher education, citizenship, and work” (Raisbeck Avia- tion High School, n.d., para. 1). The school has five guiding principles and, interestingly, partnerships is one of them. According to Raisbeck, “Learning takes place inside the school and out, in cooperation with community, business and higher education partners. Partner- ships provide human talent, facilities, technology and other resources necessary to prepare students for the ever-changing world of work and education” (Raisbeck Aviation High School, n.d., para. 7). Case Example 9: Ross Shaw Sterling Aviation High School, Houston ISD, TX Sterling Aviation High School is a magnet school within the Houston Independent School District. It currently offers aviation sciences, aircraft maintenance, and aircraft operations (which includes flight certifications). In January 2017, the school completed construction of a $72 million purpose-built aviation facility. A 237,000-sq-ft, three-story building now facilitates classroom instruction and hands-on training for up to 1,800 aviation students. The showpiece of the capital project is a 7,100-sq-ft, two-story hangar, which provides space for general aviation (GA) aircraft and aircraft engines to support the aircraft maintenance program. Additionally, the hangar accommodates a welding Figure 43. Raisbeck High School. Source: Benjamin Schneider.

Case Examples 73 lab, paint room, and automotive lab. Science labs, two full-sized flight simulators, and common areas are also provided within the facility. Unique to its location near Houston Hobby Airport, a third-floor observation deck provides students an opportunity to observe aircraft activity. With an air traffic control (ATC) audio feed, the aviation industry is brought even closer for students. According to Justin Fuentes, Sterling’s principal, “Now the kids get to walk by the hangar every day, and they get to see the planes and the other kids working in there, using the tools, and now there’s more interest in those programs” (Bendici, 2017, p. 12). Case Example 10: Seminole County Public Schools, Sanford, FL The Aviation Maintenance Academy began at Seminole High School in August 2018 after a successful Aviation Day in December 2017 held at Orlando-Sanford International Airport (OSIA). With attendance of more than 2,500 at the Aviation Day, it was clear there was significant interest among the 4th–12th grade students and families in attendance. Three years of planning culminated in a new Career Education Building, located only four miles from OSIA and housing the Aviation Maintenance Academy and three other CTE programs. The Aviation Maintenance Academy is open to all Seminole High students, and there is no cost to enroll. Students enroll in one course per year for up to four years of airframe and powerplant systems courses. Although the students do not gain their A&P certificate, graduates of this program are well on their way to enjoy success in an A&P program (possibly through one of the many community colleges offering this). Students also benefit from the ability to enroll in two dual-enrollment courses with ERAU. Interestingly, even students who attend another of the district’s nine high schools can enroll in the aviation pathway via an after-school format (Scafuri, 2018). According to Jason Wysong, executive director of Education Pathways and Strategic Partnerships for Seminole County Public Schools, high schools considering establish- ing an aviation pathway should “[a]llocate plenty of time to meet with local business partners to determine their needs and interest in supporting the program” (Scafuri, 2018, p. 55). As he explains, “Our local aviation community is committed to educating students and taking a long-term approach to developing their future workforce” (Scafuri, 2018, p. 55). Case Example 11: Sisters High School, Sisters, OR At Sisters High School, 58 students were enrolled in the high school’s aviation program during the 2018–2019 academic year. Students meet daily for STEM-related classes taught by a certified flight instructor and also obtain instruction in both simulators and actual flight time in a Cessna 172. Because of strong industry partnerships and fundraising drives, students can earn their FAA Private Pilot certificate for about half the cost of a traditional flight school. A partnership with Central Oregon Community College provides pathways for high school graduates and also has yielded a flight simulator for Sisters. Currently seeking donations for a homebuilt airplane kit, the program plans to integrate the “build” experience with its aerospace engineering course (NBAA, 2018d). Case Example 12: Tampa Bay Regional Aeronautics Academy, Tampa, FL The Tampa Bay Regional Aeronautics Academy was established to serve students in Pasco, Hillsborough, and Pinellas counties in west central Florida. According to Brian Sawyer, Aviation Academy Manager with Pasco County Schools, two highlights of the program are

74 Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges industry certification through the American Association of Airport Executives and an active internship program with Tampa International Airport. The AAAE, at the request of the Tampa Bay Regional Aeronautics Academy, developed a high school–level industry certif i- cation appropriate to the field of airport management. The airport internship offered by Tampa International Airport allows students to gain real-world airport experience during the summer while also earning college credit through ERAU. With added elementary and middle school feeder patterns, a continued supply of aviation-ready students at the high school level is ensured. Benefits of an airport management internship program, as shared by Sawyer: • Allows students to apply classroom instruction and specific skills in a professional/business setting • Allows students to observe and use current workplace practices and technologies • Enhances students’ core skills focusing on teamwork, time management, problem solving, communication, quantitative/qualitative effectiveness, organizational productivity, and critical thinking • Reveals attributes of STEM as it relates to real-world applications in developing and practicing marketable skills • Provides students with a valuable foundation for any future career or college experience • Enables students to earn both secondary and post-secondary course credit (Tampa Bay Regional Aeronautics Academy, 2017) Case Example 13: Wichita Public Schools Aviation Pathway, Wichita, KS The Wichita Public Schools Aviation Pathway program is a new program that launched in the fall of 2018. This program was launched by the initiative of Textron Aviation, who brought the plan for the program to both Wichita Public Schools and Wichita State University. Students have the option of pursuing either aviation production or aviation maintenance. Once the path is chosen, students spend their junior and senior years taking advanced coursework at both their high school and local community college (NBAA, 2018d). The program is expected to reach full implementation in time for the 2019–2020 school year. Both Textron and educational leaders in Kansas hope to expand this program to more school districts once it is off the ground (Wichita Public Schools, n.d.). Case Example 14: Aims Community College, Greeley, CO Aims Community College offers three degree programs: (1) Air Traffic Controller, A.A.S. degree, (2) Professional Pilot, A.A.S. degree, and (3) General Aviation Pilot, A.A.S. degree. Aims is the only collegiate FAA-approved Part 141 fixed-wing flight school east of the Rockies within the state of Colorado. Aims has also been designated by the FAA as an Air Traffic – Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) approved school. The program exists to “provide a collegiate education that prepares motivated aviation students with the best training possible for demanding careers as professional pilots and air traffic controllers” (Aims, 2018a, para. 9). The college has had a relationship with Greeley–Weld County Airport for flight training activities but is moving to Northern Colorado Regional Airport for “flight safety, aircraft maintenance, flight education, student accessibility, student convenience, operational efficiency, college exposure, innovation potential, fiscal, and facility considerations” (Aims, 2018b, p. 2).

Case Examples 75 Case Example 15: Colorado Northwestern Community College, Rangely, CO Colorado Northwestern Community College (CNCC) has partnered with Metropolitan State University (MSU) of Denver in an effort to ensure a continued aviation path for CNCC graduates. Specifically, CNCC students may pursue an associate’s degree from CNCC while then earning a bachelor’s degree from MSU. This program allows the student to receive flight instruction in Rangely, which is 280 miles from Denver, while saving money on housing and flight instruction. If students are not located near Rangely, CNCC’s lower-cost flight training may be enjoyed at Front Range Airport east of Denver. According to Miller (2018), CNCC also offers students an added benefit to help them get hired by an airline sooner, and students earning the dual degree will tack on that advantage as well. Case Example 16: East Valley Institute of Technology, Mesa, AZ At the East Valley Institute of Technology (EVIT), students may pursue aircraft maintenance, flight training, or air traffic control. EVIT is composed of 10 school districts in the Phoenix area, as part of the EVIT Joint Technical Education District. According to Dr. Sally Downey, superintendent of the district, “With Arizona being home to the Barry Goldwater Air Force Range, Luke Air Force Base, and numerous airports and defense contractors, there is a market need for people to go into aviation careers” (Todd, 2018, p. 34). Originally housed at Chandler-Gilbert Community College (CGCC), EVIT now has two campuses where high school students spend half of each day in career training. The EVIT East campus is located next to Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, Arizona State University– Polytechnic campus, and a number of aviation business and flight schools. Through a continuing partnership with CGCC, EVIT students may earn up to 24 college credits toward an associate’s degree in CGCC’s aviation program, as well as automatic acceptance as a junior at the University of North Dakota (UND), which operates a flight school at Gateway Airport. ASU-Polytechnic and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University are also options for students to earn their bachelor’s degree. Students at EVIT enjoy field trips to aviation museums, for example, as well as collaborating in building a kit plane that was donated by a local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association. In their second semester, students may begin flight training for their Private Pilot certificate. They also take courses in advanced aircraft systems, meteorology, advanced flight planning, and ground school. The most recent offering at EVIT is a path in unmanned systems. EVIT decided to introduce a UAS path because of realized and projected growth in the UAS industry, to include employment opportunities in this field (Todd, 2018). The partnerships with community colleges and universities have allowed EVIT to acquire a wind tunnel and engines donated by ASU, as well as flight simulators donated by ASU and UND. Yet, EVIT has also developed industry partnerships grounded in support by the state of Arizona, which has nearly 409,000 jobs tied directly or indirectly to aviation. Through an advisory council, industry professionals are ensuring that EVIT produces graduates with usable skills ready to meet industry needs. As shared by instructor Lou Amadee, “All the partnerships we’ve developed over the years have really helped. The aerospace industry is growing and they’re doing everything they can to get more youth involved” (Todd, 2018, p. 35). According to first-year student Trey Lines, 16, “The best way to go into aviation is to surround yourself in it. EVIT is a great way to get to know the basics and other people in the field. It makes school unbelievably enjoyable because it’s something I’m choosing to do” (Todd, 2018, p. 34).

76 Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges EVIT is certainly a CTE success story. According to Todd (2018), fully 88% of EVIT aviation students earn their FAA Private Pilot certificate or FAA Remote Pilot certificate, while 79% continue to college or other postsecondary training after high school. Some eventually earn their CFI designation and return to teach currently enrolled students. Case Example 17: Aviation Community Foundation, Broomfield, CO The Aviation Community Foundation is focused on high schools with aviation pathways that desire additional collaboration and are willing to both share and benefit from the sharing of quality practices. Throughout the year, this organization holds senior-level leadership workshops in which schools and nonprofits benefit from sessions on funding opportunities, best practice implementation, board creation and leadership, and technology. The goals of the Aviation Community Foundation are to “develop a quality talent pipeline for the avia- tion industry and produce confident students who are college, career and community ready” (Aviation Community Foundation, n.d., para. 1). In addition to supporting educators, the foundation develops and hosts events for students to provide opportunities for these students to connect with peers and industry leaders. Case Example 18: North Texas Aviation Education Initiative, North Texas The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), a regional Metropolitan Planning Organization, started the North Texas Aviation Education Initiative. This innovative partnership between industry, higher education, and primary education (K-12) gained traction with the 2003 publication of Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) Aviation in Higher Education: The Development of a Comprehensive Aviation Management and Commercial Pilot Program in Texas. As noted, “the 16-county North Central Texas region is home to approximately 400 landing facilities, including two commercial service airports, 11 federally designated reliever airports, and 41 other public use airports managed primarily by local governments” (North Central Texas Council of Governments, 2008, para. 3). Even so, the region has not had a public university with a comprehensive collegiate aviation program at the baccalaureate level. The work of this initiative involves offering a comprehensive website with numerous resources related to aviation careers and aviation curriculum. By partnering with three-time Super Bowl Champion and former Dallas Cowboy Russell Maryland, the initiative reached more than 6,000 students during the 2011 –2012 academic year with the good news of avia- tion career opportunities. These Russell Maryland Aviation Education Outreach events were successful in introducing students to possible aviation educational opportunities and careers (North Texas Aviation Education Initiative, n.d.). The NCTCOG’s Aviation Careers website offers a career planning tool and much more. With tabs for Students, Parents, Educators, and Employers, the website is comprehensive in its offerings. It may be accessed at http://www. nctaviationcareers.com/. Case Example 19: Atlanta Airport University, Atlanta, GA Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) is innovative in this area. Specifically, in 2018, ATL launched ATL Airport University. Specifically designed to provide “free to low-cost professional development and career preparation program[s] for airport and airport-related

Case Examples 77 employment,” the university will also “serve as a pipeline from area high schools that host CTAE programs” (Walton, 2018, para. 2–4). Additional programs to be offered include GED and various professional certifications. According to Corliss Davenport, director of the university, “this program is designed to support incumbent workers as well as students who attend a school that falls within the airport’s footprint, which includes Atlanta public schools, Clayton, and Fulton County schools” (Walton, 2018, para. 5). The airport is partnering with the Technical College System of Georgia for curriculum development. Case Example 20: Clark County Department of Aviation Airport Internship, Las Vegas, NV The Clark County Department of Aviation offers a paid summer internship program to college students at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport. The program is available to students enrolled full-time in a college aviation program, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. One unique benefit is fully paid boarding provided on the campus of the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV). Compensation ranges from $11 to $16 per hour, depending on the intern’s year in school, with seniors earning $16 per hour. Interns will gain experience in the Airside Operations Division, which includes Administration, Ramp Control, Airfield Maintenance, and Operations. Interns will also have the opportunity to work on special projects, with additional exposure at the GA airports. Similar to a departmental rotation internship, interns will also gain experience in all airport operating divisions. Case Example 21: Erie Regional Airport Authority Airport Internship, Erie, PA The Erie International Airport, operated by the Erie Regional Airport Authority, offers a 10-week, paid summer internship program. The program is available to currently enrolled students pursuing a degree in airport/aviation management, with preference given to college juniors and seniors. The airport also prefers students with a GPA of at least 2.75, profes- sional work experience in aviation, and radio operator experience. Interns gain experience performing administrative duties that support the daily activities of the Airfield Opera- tions Department. In addition, interns “will provide management direction and problem resolution to assigned special projects.” That task includes the opportunity to update SOPs, manage minimum standards, and conduct inspections in support of Part 139, Part 77, and TSA 1542. Case Example 22: Glacier Park International Airport Internship, Kalispell, MT Located near Glacier National Park and operated by the Flathead Municipal Airport Authority, Glacier Park International Airport offers a six-month paid internship program. Generally occurring in the July–December time frame, the internship is open to all junior and senior college students pursuing a degree in Aviation Management or Aeronautical Science, or graduates within one year of graduation. Interns are compensated at the rate of $10 per hour and provided experience in Operations, Planning, Aircraft Rescue Fire- fighting, Security, Maintenance, and Administration. In addition, interns are provided the opportunity to complete the ARFF 40-Hour Basic course and AAAE C.M. certification. Accord- ing to the airport, “The GPIA internship boasts a 100% job placement rate in the airport industry.”

78 Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges Case Example 23: Jacksonville Aviation Authority Airport Internship, Jacksonville, FL The Jacksonville Aviation Authority, which manages Jacksonville International Airport, Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport, Herlong Recreational Airport, and Cecil Airport, offers a robust paid summer internship program to actively enrolled college students. Students can be in both aviation and non-aviation degree fields. The 2019 program had seven openings. During the 10-week internship, interns are provided experience in Aviation Planning, Com- mercial Airport Operations, General Aviation, Human Resources, Information Technology, and Spaceport Operations. Interns are compensated at $13 per hour. Case Example 24: Mini Maker Faire, Riverside Municipal Airport, Riverside, CA In an effort to enhance collaboration between the airport and local school districts, the Riverside Municipal Airport hosts an annual Mini Maker Faire. The airport provides space both outside and within the terminal building to support booths and activities from the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Riverside Public Utilities, Riverside Public Library, Cal State University– San Bernardino, University of California–Riverside, NextGen Flight Academy, and others. The popular STEM lab presents hands-on activities, including the fling flyer design challenge, the balloon car design challenge, and the freeze lab. Additional features at the Faire include 3-D printing, virtual reality, handmade slime, and various make-and-take activities. The local community support has been strong, with K-12 students typically in attendance. This event also generates positive community goodwill for the airport, which is owned and operated by the City of Riverside.

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More airport operations/management academic programs at both the high school and community college levels would help the airport industry. With baby boomers currently reaching retirement age at the rate of 10,000 each day, and later generations much smaller in size, new employees are not entering the workforce swiftly enough to replace those leaving because of retirement, illness, and other complicating factors.

As a result, the aviation industry, like others, is experiencing a significant labor shortage. With no end in sight, the industry has joined forces in a number of unique partnerships in an effort to not only enhance the quality of current aviation graduates, but also stimulate interest in aviation careers among college students, high school students, and even middle school and elementary school students.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's ACRP Synthesis 103: Promoting Aviation Career Education in High Schools and Community Colleges points out the many characteristics of high school and community college aviation programs throughout the country, which could prove useful to airport management. By better understanding the academic programs producing the next generation of aviation professionals, airports can develop proactive efforts to promote the airport profession to aviation programs in their local area and influence young people to seriously consider airports as a viable career path, thus positively affecting the future of the airport industry.

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