National Academies Press: OpenBook

Stronger Food and Drug Regulatory Systems Abroad (2020)

Chapter: Appendix C: Call for Comments

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Call for Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Stronger Food and Drug Regulatory Systems Abroad. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25651.
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Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Call for Comments." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Stronger Food and Drug Regulatory Systems Abroad. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25651.
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Page 180

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix C Call for Comments The National Academies Committee on Stronger Food and Drug Regulatory Systems Abroad seeks comment on how emerging technologies can help food or drug regulatory agencies, especially those in low- and middle-income countries, better protect product safety. Of interest are examples of technologies that 1) support quality in informal markets; 2) reduce the cost of regulatory work; or 3) improve efficiency. The committee also seeks comment on the challenges of using these technologies. Anyone wishing to submit a comment should email the committee at fooddrugregsys@nas.edu. We request that comments be submitted before June 14, 2019. All comments will be filed for public access. PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS C-1

Next: Appendix D: Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad »
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Ensuring the safety of food and the quality and safety of medicines in a country is an important role of government, made more complicated by global manufacturing and international trade. By recent estimates, unsafe food kills over 400,000 people a year, a third of them children under 5, mostly in low- and middle-income countries; every year poor quality medicines cause about 70,000 excess deaths from childhood pneumonia and roughly 8,500 to 20,000 malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa alone.

The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) Office of Global Policy and Strategy is charged with improving capacity of the agency's foreign counterpart offices and increasing understanding of the importance of regulatory systems for public health, development, and trade. At the request of the FDA, this study sets out a strategy to support good quality, wholesome food and safe, effective medical products around the world. Its goal is to build on the momentum for strengthening regulatory systems and to set a course for sustainability and continued progress.

The 2012 report Ensuring Safe Food and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Systems Abroad outlined strategies to secure international supply chains, emphasized capacity building and support for surveillance in low- and middle-income countries, and explored ways to facilitate work sharing among food and medical product regulatory agencies. This new study assess progress made and the current regulatory landscape.

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