National Academies Press: OpenBook

Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches

« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop and Open Session Agendas
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Appendix B

Committee Biographical Sketches

Enriqueta C. Bond, Ph.D., M.A. (Chair), served from 1994 to 2008 as the first full-time president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF), a private, independent foundation dedicated to advancing the medical sciences by supporting research and other scientific and educational activities. During her presidency, Dr. Bond guided BWF in its transition from a corporate to a private foundation. Prior to joining BWF, Dr. Bond served as the executive officer for the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bond currently is a founding partner of QE Philanthropic Advisors, which provides consulting services to philanthropic and nonprofit organizations on program development, governance, leadership, and organizational structure and function. Dr. Bond was the chair of the National Research Council’s Board on African Science Academy Development and a former member of the Forum on Microbial Threats. She is a past member of the National Academies’ Report Review Committee as well as many other consensus study committees. Dr. Bond is the recipient of numerous honors, including the 2008 Order of the Long Leaf Pine award from the state of North Carolina—the highest honor the governor can bestow upon a citizen. This award was given to Dr. Bond for her efforts to improve science education for the children of North Carolina. In 1997 she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Medicine. In 2004 she was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for her distinguished contributions to the study and analysis of policy for the advancement of the health sciences. She received her bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College, her M.A. from the University of Virginia, and her Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemical genetics from Georgetown University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D. (Vice-Chair), is the chief of the Division of Pain Medicine and the Redlich Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Neurosciences and Neurology at Stanford University. Dr. Mackey received his B.S.E. and M.S.E. in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering and his M.D. from the University of Arizona. Dr. Mackey directs the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory with a broad range of pain research on understanding the mechanisms of pain and improving patients’ quality of life. The lab’s research includes mapping the specific brain and spinal cord regions that perceive and process pain and the development of a multidisciplinary treatment model that translates basic science research into innovative therapies to provide more effective, personalized treatments for patients with chronic pain. Dr. Mackey is the author of more than 200 journal articles and book chapters in addition to numerous national and international lectures. Dr. Mackey has served as the principal investigator for multiple National Institutes of Health (NIH) and foundation research grants investigating chronic pain and novel analgesics for acute and chronic pain. He is the past president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Mackey served as a member of the Institute of Medicine committee that issued the report Relieving Pain in America. He was the co-chair of the oversight committee for the NIH/Health and Human Services National Pain Strategy (NPS), an effort to establish a national health strategy for pain care, education, and research. In the past 2 years he has received the American Pain Society Wilbert E. Fordyce Clinical Investigator Award, the Pain Medicine Fellowship Award and the Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the NIH Directors’ Award for his efforts on the NPS.

Penney Cowan is the founder and chief executive officer of the American Chronic Pain Association (ACPA). She herself is a person with chronic pain and established the ACPA in 1980 to help others living with the condition. The ACPA provides peer support and education in pain management skills to people with pain and their families. The ACPA also works to build awareness about chronic pain among professionals, decision makers, and the general public. Since 1980 Ms. Cowan has been an advocate and consumer representative for pain issues. She was awarded the Jefferson Medal for Outstanding Citizen by the Institute for Public Service, Washington, and is listed in Who’s Who in America, 24th Edition. The American Pain Society awarded her the 2005 John and Emma Bonica Public Service Award and the Elizabeth Narcessian Award for Outstanding Educational Achievements in 2013, and she received the Presidential Commendation from the American Academy of Pain Medicine, also in 2013. She has served as the consumer representative for the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Drug Evaluation and Research’s Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee for 2012 and was a member of the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee of the National Institutes of Health from 2013 to 2015. Ms. Cowan began the Partners for Understanding Pain campaign in 2002 in an attempt to raise awareness about the need to better understand, assess, and treat pain. There are more than 80 partner organizations. The campaign, under the direction of the ACPA, successfully established September as Pain Awareness Month.

David Deitz, M.D., Ph.D., is the principal of David Deitz & Associates, a consulting firm focused on helping clients design and implement strategies to obtain high-value health outcomes for patients and employers. Dr. Deitz is a nationally recognized expert with 25 years of experience in managed medical care, health care outcomes evaluation and reporting, and usage management systems in both workers compensation and group health. In this role he has worked with employers, labor, state regulators, and lawmakers in more than 20 states on reform efforts, and he has served on a number of task forces and committees nationwide. He was engaged for many years as the national medical director of commercial insurance claims for Liberty Mutual Insurance, where he was responsible for medical review operations, medical networks, and medical policy for workers compensation. Prior to joining Liberty Mutual, he worked in the private sector overseeing content development of managed care software and reporting systems, which were successfully deployed at insurers nationwide. In addition to this work, Dr. Deitz spent two decades as a practicing physician in both emergency and internal medicine. He completed his post-graduate training at the University of Miami and Harvard Medical School and is board certified in internal medicine.

Francesca C. Dwamena, M.D., M.S., FACP, FAACH, is a professor and the chair of the Department of Medicine at Michigan State University. Dr. Dwamena also is an adjunct professor of psychiatry and an attending physician for the Michigan State University Health Team and at Sparrow Hospital. She specializes in psychosocial medicine and has authored more than 40 published works on clinical and primary medicine, including on the identification of and treatment for medically unexplained symptoms. She is a co-author of two books on evidence-based patient-centered interviewing and the essentials of psychiatry in primary care. In addition to her clinical practice and research, she has held a variety of leadership positions and volunteer roles with various national and state-level professional societies and nonprofit organizations, including Harvard Medical School, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, the Society of General Medicine, and the American College of Physicians. Additionally, she has served as a committee member

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

for the Institute of Medicine consensus committee that produced the report Gulf War and Health: Treatment of Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Dr. Dwamena received her M.D. from the Howard University College of Medicine and her M.S. in epidemiology and a certificate in psychosocial medicine from Michigan State University.

Roger B. Fillingim, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor and the director of the Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence (PRICE) at the University of Florida (UF). He served as the president of the American Pain Society from 2012 to 2014, served as co-chair of the Federal Pain Research Strategy Disparities Workgroup, and is currently a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee. PRICE provides resources in support of clinical and translational pain research and facilitates collaborations among UF pain researchers and other UF programs of research excellence. A clinical psychologist by training, he has had a longstanding interest in research to address the nation’s most disabling and expensive public health problem, chronic pain. Dr. Fillingim’s research program has focused on understanding the factors that contribute to individual differences in the experience of pain. He and his colleagues have shown consistent sex differences in pain responses, which may contribute to females’ increased risk for chronic pain. In addition, his work has identified several genetic factors that contribute to pain perception and analgesic responses. His current grants include a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Aging, which investigates biological and psychosocial factors contributing to ethnic group differences in osteoarthritis pain. He also served as the principal investigator for the Florida site of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research–funded OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study, which was created to identify risk factors for the development of temporomandibular disorders and related pain conditions. Dr. Fillingim has received several awards, including a UF Foundation Preeminence Term Professorship as well as the 2009 Wilbert E. Fordyce Clinical Investigator Award and the Distinguished Service Award, both from the American Pain Society. He earned his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in pain research at the University of North Carolina.

Margaret M. Heitkemper, R.N., FAAN, Ph.D., is a professor and the chair of the Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Informatics where she also is the co-director of the Center for Innovations in Sleep Self-Management and an adjunct professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Washington. She received her B.S.N. from

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Seattle University, her master’s degree in nursing from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She leads an interdisciplinary team focused on the study of the pathophysiology and non-pharmacological management of individuals with chronic abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Her research in this area has included both descriptive and mechanistic studies focused on the role of general and lifestyle factors in chronic pain conditions. Dr. Heitkemper’s research has included a focus on genetic and potential proteomic markers of chronic abdominal pain. Her team has also conducted randomized clinical trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy for persons with IBS. She served on the Institute of Medicine committee that issued the report Relieving Pain in America.

Francis Keefe, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Duke University Medical Center and a member of the Cancer Prevention, Detection, and Control Program of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Keefe is the director of the Duke Pain Prevention and Treatment Research Program, an active clinical research program supported by the NIH and concerned with the behavioral assessment and treatment of patients having acute and persistent pain. Dr. Keefe played a key role in the development of the clinical pain services and pain research programs at the Duke University Medical Center. For 20 years he directed the pain management program and was a leader in the development of the Duke University Medical Center’s multidisciplinary pain programs (both out-patient and in-patient). Dr. Keefe has developed and refined a number of treatment protocols for persistent pain conditions (e.g., cancer, arthritis), including spouse- and partner-assisted pain-coping skills training interventions. He has conducted a number of randomized clinical trials testing the efficacy of these and other behavioral interventions (e.g., aerobic exercise protocols, yoga-based interventions, mindfulness-based interventions, forgiveness-based interventions, loving kindness meditation, and emotional disclosure). Dr. Keefe has served on numerous study sections and has chaired two NIH study sections (Behavioral Medicine: Interventions and Outcomes, and Psychological Risk and Disease Prevention). Dr. Keefe has published more than 370 papers as well as 60 book chapters and 3 books on topics ranging from pain during mammography to the assessment and treatment of cancer pain at end of life. He currently serves as the editor-in-chief of the journal Pain, the leading journal in the field of pain research. In 2012 he was awarded the John D. Loeser award for excellence in clinical pain research by the International Association for the Study of Pain. In 2016 he was awarded the Distinguished Scientist Award by the Society of Behavioral Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Kate Lorig, Dr.P.H., is a professor emerita (acting) at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the past director of the Stanford Patient Education Research Center. She has a master’s degree in nursing and a doctorate in public health with a specialty in health education. For more than four decades, using a public health approach, she has developed and evaluated community-based patient education programs in English and Spanish for people with chronic conditions including arthritis, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, and AIDS. In recent years, this work has been extended to similar programs offered via the Internet. Her present research includes the development and evaluation of programs for cancer survivors as well as for caregivers of people with posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other cognitive impairments. These programs are offered largely over the Internet. Most recently, she has been involved in studying how to translate programs from the academic setting to the larger community.

Richard Ohrbach, D.D.S., Ph.D., earned a D.D.S. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), a certificate in pain management (University of California, Los Angeles), an M.S. in oral sciences, and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology (University at Buffalo) and performed postdoctoral studies in behavioral epidemiology (University of Washington). One of his primary research objectives has been the development of new diagnostic standards for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The new standards, whose development was supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and which are now internationally recognized, offer both researchers and health professionals (1) an improved screening tool to identify painful TMDs, (2) validated diagnostic criteria grounded in supportive scientific evidence that more readily differentiate the most common forms of TMDs, and (3) improved psychosocial assessment tools. The other primary research objective, via the OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study, has been cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses related to incident cases with TMDs as well as chronic TMDs as well as of physical–psychological interactions relevant to the development and persistence of pain disorders. Dr. Ohrbach is a member of the American Academy of Orofacial Pain, American Pain Society, International Association for Dental Research, International Association for the Study of Pain, and International Network for Orofacial Pain and Related Disorders Methodology (INfORM). From 2003 to 2006 he served as the director of the International Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders Consortium (now INfORM), an International Association for Dental Research scientific group/network that he co-founded.

Amanda C. Pustilnik, J.D., is a professor of law at the University of Maryland School of Law and faculty at the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Massachusetts General Hospital. Her work focuses on the intersections of law, science, and culture, with a particular emphasis on the brain. In 2015 she served as Harvard Law School’s first senior fellow on law and applied neuroscience. Her collaborations with scientists on brain imaging of pain and addiction led to her recent work on opioids on behalf of the Aspen Institute. Prior to entering the academy, Professor Pustilnik practiced litigation at Sullivan & Cromwell, clerked on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, and worked as a management consultant at McKinsey & Co., in New York. She attended Harvard College, Yale Law School, and the University of Cambridge, where she studied history and philosophy of science. Her work has been published in numerous law reviews and peer-reviewed scientific journals, including Nature.

Srinivasa N. Raja, M.B.B.S., is a professor of anesthesiology and neurology and the director of pain research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Raja received his residency training in anesthesiology at the University of Washington, Seattle, and postdoctoral training at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville. Dr. Raja’s clinical and research interests include the management of chronic neuropathic pain states, understanding the peripheral and central mechanisms of neuropathic pain, and identifying novel peripheral targets for alleviating chronic neuropathic pain. Dr. Raja served as an editor of Anesthesiology from 1998 to 2006 and a section editor for the journal Pain from 2012 to 2014. He was a member of the Food and Drug Administration’s scientific advisory panel for the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Dr. Raja served as a member of the scientific advisory committee for the World Congress on Pain from 2008 to 2012 and as the chair of the scientific program committee for the 15th World Congress on Pain in Buenos Aires in 2014. He was the chair of NeuPSIG, the neuropathic pain special interest group of the International Association for the Study of Pain, and the secretary of the International Association for the Study of Pain, from 2014 to 2016. In 2015 he was appointed as a member of the Federal Pain Research Strategy Steering Committee, which is charged with coordinating the research efforts in the field of pain across all U.S. federal funding agencies. Dr. Raja and his collaborators have received funding from the National Institutes of Health for their research for nearly 30 years and have published more than 200 original articles in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Raja has been invited as a visiting professor to several institutions, including the Benjamin G. Covino Lecture at Harvard University (2007) and the John J. Bonica Lecture at the University of Washington (2008) and Heidelberg University (2019). He was the recipient of the Wilbert E. Fordyce Clinical Investigator Award from the American Pain Society (2008) and the prestigious John J. Bonica Award from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

(2010). He will be the recipient of the John J. Bonica Distinguished Lecture award at the World Congress on Pain (Amsterdam, 2020).

Cory M. Resnick, M.D., D.M.D., F.A.C.S., is an assistant professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and he practices pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. His clinical practice emphasizes the surgical management of craniofacial anomalies and syndromes, orthognathic (jaw) surgery, pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, and temporomandibular disorders. Dr. Resnick is an active member of the multidisciplinary craniofacial and vascular anomalies teams. In addition to Dr. Resnick’s busy clinical practice, he is dedicated to innovation and improvement in his field through research and education. Dr. Resnick is the author of many publications in peer-reviewed journals within and outside the scope of oral surgery as well as chapters in multiple textbooks. He lectures to medical and dental students at the Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and he mentors oral and maxillofacial surgery residents through the Massachusetts General Hospital residency program. Dr. Resnick received his undergraduate and dental degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He then received general surgery and oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Resnick is certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and was inducted as a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

Antony Rosen, M.B.Ch.B., B.Sc. (Hons), is the vice-dean for research and the director of the Division of Rheumatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he is the Mary Betty Stevens Professor of Medicine and a professor of pathology and cell biology. He leads Johns Hopkins in Health, the enterprise program in precision medicine and individualized health. Dr. Rosen completed medical school at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, was a postdoctoral fellow in immunology at The Rockefeller University, and pursued internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Rosen’s interests are in the autoimmune rheumatic diseases and their mechanisms, and he is focused on understanding the specificity of the immune response in the different rheumatic syndromes, including scleroderma, myositis, and Sjogren’s syndrome. Dr. Rosen was a Pew Scholar in the biomedical sciences, a Burroughs Wellcome translational research scholar, received a National Institutes of Health MERIT award from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), and is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians. He chaired the scientific advisory committee of the NIDCR-funded Sjogren’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

International Collaborative Clinical Alliance from 2004 to 2007, was a member of the American College of Rheumatology’s board of directors, and is currently chair of the board of scientific counselors of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Kathleen A. Sluka, PT, Ph.D., is a professor of physical therapy and rehabilitation sciences at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and a member of the Pain Research Program at the University of Iowa. Dr. Sluka has published more than 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters as well as an evidence-based textbook titled Pain Mechanisms and Management for the Physical Therapist, which covers basic science mechanisms, physical therapy treatments, interdisciplinary care, and pain syndromes. Dr. Sluka’s translational research laboratory focuses on the neurobiology of musculoskeletal pain and non-pharmacological treatments using animal models and the translation of mechanisms to human subjects, clinical trials for non-pharmacological treatments for chronic pain, and implementation of effective non-pharmacological treatments to clinical practice. Her research methods include cell culture, molecular biology, genetic manipulations, behavioral pharmacology, clinical trial methodology, and implementation science. She has received numerous awards, including the Marian Williams Award for Research in Physical Therapy and the Catherine Worthingham Fellow Award from the American Physical Therapy Association and the Kerr Basic Science Research Award from the American Pain Society. She received a physical therapy degree from Georgia State University and a Ph.D. in anatomy from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

Barbara G. Vickrey, M.D., M.P.H., specializes in translating clinical evidence into improvements in routine medical practice that benefit patients’ health. Her wide-ranging accomplishments include demonstrating that collaboration among health care systems, community organizations, and caregivers can improve quality of care and outcomes for dementia patients. She has also designed health care delivery innovations ranging from better control of post-stroke risk factors in underserved populations to new ways to care for veterans with Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Vickrey was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2011. Dr. Vickrey leads a multi-year, stroke prevention/intervention research program in health disparities funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. She serves on the science committee of the American Academy of Neurology and is immediate past president of the American Neurological Association. Dr. Vickrey served for 25 years on the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where she was a professor of neurology and the director of the departmental Health Services Research Program. She was also the associate director for research at the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×

Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center. Dr. Vickrey earned her M.D. at the Duke University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. at the UCLA School of Public Health. She completed post-graduate clinical training in medicine and neurology at the University of Washington in Seattle and then research fellowships in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at UCLA and the RAND/UCLA Center for Health Policy Study.

Robert Weyant, D.M.D., Dr.P.H., is the associate dean for public health and a professor and the chair of the Department of Dental Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. He is also a professor of epidemiology in the Graduate School of Public Health and on the faculty of the Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. Dr. Weyant is a former U.S. Navy dental officer and Veterans Health Administration dentist and has been a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health since 1987. Dr. Weyant is a past president of the American Association for Public Health Dentistry and is the current editor-in-chief of the Journal of Public Health Dentistry. Dr. Weyant’s research involves general and social epidemiological research related to oral health disparities and oral disease etiology. He is presently a principal investigator or co-principal investigator on several National Institutes of Health–funded studies of oral disease etiology and also the project director of a Health Resources and Services Administration funded training grant for dental students. Dr. Weyant teaches and conducts research in evidence-based practices and has authored four systematic reviews and associated clinical practices guidelines. Dr. Weyant has served on numerous local, state, and national committees aimed at reducing oral health disparities, improving evidence-based practice, increasing the dental workforce, and improving access to oral care. He received his M.P.H. and his dental degree from the University of Pittsburgh and his doctorate in epidemiology from the University of Michigan.

Hai Yao, Ph.D., is the Ernest R. Norville Endowed Chair in Biomedical Engineering at Clemson University and the associate chair of the Clemson University–Medical University of South Carolina Joint Bioengineering Program. He is also the director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence for Translational Research Improving Musculoskeletal Health. Dr. Yao’s tissue biomechanics laboratory focuses on the biomechanics and mechanobiology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in order to understand the pathophysiology of TMJ degeneration to facilitate earlier diagnosis and management of temporomandibular disorders. In 2013 Dr. Yao participated in the NIH TMJ Roundtable, which provided research recommendations to NIH as well as the broader scientific community. Dr. Yao received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Miami.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 351
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 352
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 353
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 354
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 355
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 356
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 357
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 358
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 359
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25652.
×
Page 360
Next: Appendix C: Commissioned Paper by Gary Slade and Justin Durham: Prevalence, Impact, and Costs of Treatment for Temporomandibular Disorders »
Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $80.00 Buy Ebook | $64.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), are a set of more than 30 health disorders associated with both the temporomandibular joints and the muscles and tissues of the jaw. TMDs have a range of causes and often co-occur with a number of overlapping medical conditions, including headaches, fibromyalgia, back pain and irritable bowel syndrome. TMDs can be transient or long-lasting and may be associated with problems that range from an occasional click of the jaw to severe chronic pain involving the entire orofacial region. Everyday activities, including eating and talking, are often difficult for people with TMDs, and many of them suffer with severe chronic pain due to this condition. Common social activities that most people take for granted, such as smiling, laughing, and kissing, can become unbearable. This dysfunction and pain, and its associated suffering, take a terrible toll on affected individuals, their families, and their friends. Individuals with TMDs often feel stigmatized and invalidated in their experiences by their family, friends, and, often, the health care community. Misjudgments and a failure to understand the nature and depths of TMDs can have severe consequences - more pain and more suffering - for individuals, their families and our society.

Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care calls on a number of stakeholders - across medicine, dentistry, and other fields - to improve the health and well-being of individuals with a TMD. This report addresses the current state of knowledge regarding TMD research, education and training, safety and efficacy of clinical treatments of TMDs, and burden and costs associated with TMDs. The recommendations of Temporomandibular Disorders focus on the actions that many organizations and agencies should take to improve TMD research and care and improve the overall health and well-being of individuals with a TMD.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!