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Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
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Page 65
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
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Page 66
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"11 Future Directions." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Neuroscience Data in the Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25653.
×
Page 72

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

11 Future Directions Highlightsa • Technical, financial, legal, regulatory, ethical, and psychosocial challenges all need to be addressed to advance cloud-based neuroscience research (Haas). • The cloud has enabled closed-loop neurofeedback as a treat- ment approach for disorders where ability to monitor brain activity in real time is critical, such as schizophrenia or depres- sion (Willke). • Developing cloud-based technologies and platforms requires collaboration and sharing of tools, data, and methods across multiple institutions, and progress has been made in several areas (Willke). • Open-source data sharing has supported the development of new validated outcome measures and the identification of bio- markers for multiple sclerosis; however, collecting data from multiple studies and companies presents legal and logistical challenges (Landsman, Weber). • To optimally apply cloud-based technologies in the future, training is needed for scientists across different domains and stages and for other stakeholder groups (Barch, Haas, Willke). 65 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

66 NEUROSCIENCE DATA IN THE CLOUD • Both governmental and private funding sources will be needed to build advanced cloud infrastructure, standardize data, and improve the quality of data (Borges, Landsman, Willke). a These points were made by the individual workshop participants identified above. They are not intended to reflect a consensus among workshop participants. To move cloud-based neuroscience research forward, there are many challenges, including technical, financial, legal, regulatory, ethical, and psychosocial, said Magali Haas. During the workshop, topics that came up frequently included sustainability, infrastructure development, training, and funding needs. Enduring data platform software solutions are needed, along with frameworks for future proofing data, said Haas. Sean Hill added that interoperability between platforms and common data models is key. Haas argued that tangible next steps and action items are needed that can be collectively addressed. She said that when Cohen Veterans B ­ iosciences faced a similar challenge in which they wanted to develop a platform that would facilitate big data modeling and cloud computing with multiple data types, they went through a 2-year exercise of evaluating hun- dreds of available platforms according to the 45 identified characteristics, winnowed down to the top 10 requirements (see Figure 11-1). Haas said each platform they examined had different benefits and limitations. In addi- tion, some that were funded by government grants ceased to exist, which emphasizes the importance of sustainability. Ted Willke, director of the Brain-Inspired Computing Lab at Intel, sug- gested that it will be important to focus on four or five requirements that are most relevant to the types of data and goals of the study. Jane Roskams added that another key step is to prioritize elements that may be more doable and tangible in the short term versus the long term, and then build from there by developing a readable, accessible roadmap. TECHNOLOGY AND METHODS: PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES An example of the opportunities and challenges encountered in develop- ing a new technology was provided by Willke. Closed-loop neuro­eedback f in the cloud is becoming an important treatment approach for many disor- ders, including depression, schizophrenia, and posttraumatic stress disorder. It enables visualization of brain activity in real time, which requires a lot of preprocessing and analytics in the cloud. Machine learning could also allow automatic selection of regions of interest in the brain, he said. The architecture needed to achieve this would need to be scaled across multiple machines with unlimited processing memory, storage, and communications PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs FIGURE 11-1  Big Data Framework—Top 10 platform requirements. The 10 major components for a well-functioning and adaptable neuroscience data platform, as prioritized and characterized from an analysis project conducted by Cohen Veterans Biosciences. The platform would support both data storage and cloud computing for a wide range of data modalities. NOTE: API = application program interface; FAIR = findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable. 67 SOURCE: Presentation by Magali Haas, September 24, 2019.

68 NEUROSCIENCE DATA IN THE CLOUD among systems, and could enable a full brain correlation analysis on one research participant or multiple research participants, possibly in less than a second. Developing these cloud-based technologies requires collaborators to share tools, methods, and data across multiple institutions, and could pro- vide complex systems to researchers who lack the computer science and engineering expertise needed to create such systems themselves, said Willke. Putting all this in the cloud is necessary because it would be too difficult to develop and maintain in an institution’s private cloud or in a container environment. Rather, a parallel distributed system with associated depen- dencies would be needed, said Willke. Challenges unique to the cloud, such as network and service delays, will require new stream-based systems frameworks and impact how pre- processing and machine learning models are dealt with, said Willke. Real time brings additional challenges, including being able to describe temporal data and the conditions under which those data were collected. He said much work needs to be done to develop data and processing standards to enable the development of these technologies. Validating that the pipeline will run as fast as needed will also be required. He added that cost will be an important consideration: The system should run as fast as possible, but not use any more resources than necessary. Willke said there has been progress in developing such real-time cloud systems, including a depression study involving investigators at Princeton, Penn Med, University of Chicago, and Intel. He said this is one of the first uses of running the cloud in one area of the country and servicing a clinical study at a medical school in another. Other examples of successful open-source data sharing between indus- try and academia were described by Douglas Landsman, vice president of research at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS). In one initiative, NMSS helped organize a large project to develop new validated outcomes for Phase 3 clinical trials using federated data from multiple industry-­ sponsored trials. More recently, they are leading a multi­ takeholder inter- s national initiative aiming to identify biomarkers of disability progression to speed Phase 2 clinical trials in progressive MS. This project will combine two existing data management and data sharing systems by combining LORIS (see Chapter 4) with SPINE (Structured Planning and Implementa- tion of New Explorations), a web-based, virtual laboratory designed to support the design and distributed execution of experiments centered on specific scientific questions.1 Using a federated database and cloud com- puting, this project aims to create local data repositories at multiple sites, 1  To learn more about Spine, see https://cni.bwh.harvard.edu/front-and-back-end-­ evelopment- d spine-0 (accessed January 21, 2020). PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

FUTURE DIRECTIONS 69 enabling investigators to conduct experiments and collaboratively review results. Collecting data from multiple trials and companies has presented numerous challenges, including legal hurdles and a substantial amount of data cleaning and formatting to enable harmonization, said Landsman. These problems are recurrent, predictable, and solvable. There will always be some manual data cleaning required, which will probably require more resources than originally anticipated, said Landsman. Nick Weber advo- cated structuring data to be as open and accessible as possible and in a way that ensures distribution of costs so that the burden does not fall only on those producing the data. He suggested developing a central clearinghouse of cloud-based resources specific to neuroscience. Maryann Martone added that it will also be important to change the mindset of researchers to under- stand that data they are producing will be reused at some point, so that they collect and manage data with that in mind. TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS Training the next generation of neuroscience researchers in the use of cloud-based technologies is essential across different domains and stages, from graduate students new to the field to more senior scientists who may need retraining, said Deanna Barch. Educating the next generation of researchers to understand cloud-based tools and start using them in early stages of their research could accelerate clinical use, said Willke. He noted that both Princeton and Yale have begun integrating cloud-based toolkits into their curricula. Haas added that training is also needed across a broad range of stakeholder groups to increase understanding of the regu- latory implications of cloud technologies. Story Landis, former director of NINDS, suggested that it might be possible to engage professional societies and meeting organizers to conduct such trainings at conferences. FUNDING: CURRENT COMMITMENTS AND FUTURE NEEDS Fundraising from governmental and private sources is needed to accom- plish foundational work for data standardization, hosting, and reproduc- ibility, and to build advanced cloud infrastructure, said Willke. Jonathan Cohen noted that the 5-year effort Willke described was funded entirely by Intel and is entirely open source, making it a model of academic–industrial collaboration. Congress has appropriated $20 million for the development of a data warehouse primarily for opioid-related activities at FDA, said Silvana Borges. FDA hopes to include not only data from different sources, such as data related to distribution, prescription, and abuse patterns; safety data; PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

70 NEUROSCIENCE DATA IN THE CLOUD and data from social media. Integrating these types of data adds complex- ity to the construction of the warehouse because the data may be in non- standardized forms and from unfamiliar or distant sources. Building an infrastructure for data linkage and the analytical tools needed to integrate these different sources of information should help address the opioid crisis while also providing a model for future data integration efforts in other disease areas, said Borges. However, she acknowledged concerns about the sustainability funding for these efforts. Landsman said NMSS is eager to partner with investigators and pro- vide funding for good, well-planned, and potentially long-term data man- agement projects. He suggested that funders, including both NIH and private sources, could require data management plans in future projects as a condition of funding. POTENTIAL NEXT STEPS: WORKING GROUPS TO MOVE FIELD FORWARD Individual workshop participants discussed potential next steps that could help researchers and institutions navigate using the cloud for neuro- science data storage and computation. Articulating long-term strategic goals and prioritizing them will ulti- mately be the most productive way to make progress, stated Michael H ­ awrylycz. He added that it is clear that informatics and the cloud will become increasingly important in neuroscience. It will therefore be more productive to proactively imagine where the field would ideally head and plan for that, rather than implementing short-term fixes. Some specific areas that could benefit from such proactive strategic planning that individual workshop participants raised included • Developing common data model frameworks and support for data transformations between platform or software versions, said Haas. Hill agreed that common data models are an important part of a potential solution that would address interoperability among platforms. • Defining and advocating for a policy about, and potentially protec- tions against, reidentification of patients based on pooled data, said Haas. • Building sustainability models for software, infrastructure, and funding, including support for enduring data platforms. For exam- ple, Haas noted that in an evaluation performed by Cohen Veterans ­ Bioscience, some well-run platforms supported by government grants disappeared unexpectedly when funding lapsed. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

FUTURE DIRECTIONS 71 To design future platforms and tools, Walter Koroshetz, director of NINDS, said that focusing on utility for users can help prioritize the most valuable actions or resources, and inform both scientific and financial deci- sions. Pilot examples from the BRAIN initiative, and the AMPs on AD and PD, could be informative starting places. Other approaches to learning from existing initiatives could be to catalog existing platforms, data, and pipelines. Haas said that existing platforms could be evaluated for specific capabilities and as models, such as which platforms have the “best-in-class solutions” for different data types or models. This work could be coordi- nated with existing coordinating bodies, such as NIH or INCF. To support broader and easier use of the cloud, multiple indi­ idualv workshop participants highlighted the benefits of assembling existing resources and examples of consent forms and governance materials that could be used as templates. Stacia Friedman-Hill said that the NIMH C ­ linical Research Toolbox is an existing resource that links out to informa- tion about regulations for clinical research. That website could potentially also be a resource to collect or post consent form language in a centralized repository. Similarly, other areas that could benefit from collecting, evaluating, and comparing existing practices that individual participants discussed included reporting incidental findings in genetic analyses, data storage and priori- tization, and sharing code with protections. Michael Milham noted that establishing best practices for assigning credit and incentivizing data shar- ing would be beneficial, particularly for tenure and promotion decisions. Some participants also discussed training as a mechanism to support greater use of the cloud, noting that training could be tailored to differ- ent groups and encompass different levels of familiarity. Several examples were for new trainees such as graduate students; for those who have some experience, but could benefit from additional information; for funders of research; or for oversight groups such as IRBs, said Barch. Haas said that redesigned training could facilitate understanding of implications for using the cloud, including broad data sharing or regulatory implications. Roskams added that an essential component to a successful training initia- tive would be to develop a widely accessible “toolkit” for use, especially for institutions that may have fewer resources available to develop train- ing programs de novo. Planning for widespread use of the cloud in the future will benefit from engaging a broad group of users now. Koroshetz suggested involving users who may not be as familiar with cloud-based tools, and who are not data scientists. This step could improve overall utility and guide iterations of future products based on existing platforms. Huerta noted that it would be good to engage leaders of existing data platforms in any follow-on activities that might be organized after the workshop. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

72 NEUROSCIENCE DATA IN THE CLOUD Although many challenges still need to be addressed, from technical to legal to ethical to cultural, there is also a great deal of excitement about what is possible, said Haas, and there is the will and ability to take on the challenges and usher in better—and more widespread—use of the cloud for neuroscience data. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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The cloud model of data sharing has led to a vast increase in the quantity and complexity of data and expanded access to these data, which has attracted many more researchers, enabled multi-national neuroscience collaborations, and facilitated the development of many new tools. Yet, the cloud model has also produced new challenges related to data storage, organization, and protection. Merely switching the technical infrastructure from local repositories to cloud repositories is not enough to optimize data use.

To explore the burgeoning use of cloud computing in neuroscience, the National Academies Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted a workshop on September 24, 2019. A broad range of stakeholders involved in cloud-based neuroscience initiatives and research explored the use of cloud technology to advance neuroscience research and shared approaches to address current barriers. This publication summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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