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Heritable Human Genome Editing (2020)

Chapter: Acknowledgment of Reviewers

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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgment of Reviewers." National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society. 2020. Heritable Human Genome Editing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25665.
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Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This report was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Sonia Abdelhak, The Pasteur Institute of Tunis (Tunisia)

Ruth Chadwick, Cardiff University (United Kingdom)

Pat Clarke, European Disability Forum (European Union)

Bernd Gänsbacher, Technical University of Munich (Germany)

Mohammed Ghaly, Hamad Bin Khalifa University (Qatar)

Mary Herbert, Newcastle University (United Kingdom)

Rudolf Jaenisch, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA)

Kazuto Kato, Osaka University (Japan)

Tim Lewens, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

John Lim, Duke University-National University of Singapore (Singapore)

David Liu, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University (USA)

Dennis Lo, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

Robin Lovell-Badge, The Francis Crick Institute (United Kingdom)

Luigi Naldini, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University (Italy)

Kathy Niakan, The Francis Crick Institute (United Kingdom)

Kelly Ormond, Stanford University (USA)

Sharon Terry, Genetic Alliance (USA)

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Suzanne Cory, University of Melbourne (Australia), and Janet Rossant, The Gairdner Foundation (Canada). Acting on behalf of the study’s International Oversight Board, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring Commission and the institutions.

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgment of Reviewers." National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society. 2020. Heritable Human Genome Editing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25665.
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The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president.

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia K. McNutt is president.

Learn more about the National Academy of Medicine and National Academy of Sciences at www.nationalacademies.org.

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Learn more about the Royal Society at www.royalsociety.org.

Consensus Study Reports document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independent peer-review process and it represents the position of the authoring institutions on the statement of task.

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgment of Reviewers." National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society. 2020. Heritable Human Genome Editing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25665.
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Page 219
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgment of Reviewers." National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Society. 2020. Heritable Human Genome Editing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25665.
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Page 220
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Heritable human genome editing - making changes to the genetic material of eggs, sperm, or any cells that lead to their development, including the cells of early embryos, and establishing a pregnancy - raises not only scientific and medical considerations but also a host of ethical, moral, and societal issues. Human embryos whose genomes have been edited should not be used to create a pregnancy until it is established that precise genomic changes can be made reliably and without introducing undesired changes - criteria that have not yet been met, says Heritable Human Genome Editing.

From an international commission of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.K.'s Royal Society, the report considers potential benefits, harms, and uncertainties associated with genome editing technologies and defines a translational pathway from rigorous preclinical research to initial clinical uses, should a country decide to permit such uses. The report specifies stringent preclinical and clinical requirements for establishing safety and efficacy, and for undertaking long-term monitoring of outcomes. Extensive national and international dialogue is needed before any country decides whether to permit clinical use of this technology, according to the report, which identifies essential elements of national and international scientific governance and oversight.

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