National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix D. Acronyms/Abbreviations
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E. Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Transportation Network Companies (TNCs): Impacts to Airport Revenues and Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25671.
×
Page 111
Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E. Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Transportation Network Companies (TNCs): Impacts to Airport Revenues and Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25671.
×
Page 112

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

ACRP 01-35: TNCS: IMPACTS TO AIRPORT REVENUES AND OPERATIONS AUGUST 19, 2019 FINAL DRAFT DELIVERABLE Reference Guide | E-1 | Appendix E APPENDIX E GLOSSARY Airport Capital Plan (ACP): The document that defines the financial and programmatic expenditures for the capital programs and projects proposed to meet facility needs, as well as agency mission and goals, for a multiyear period. The ACP includes the scope, cost, and schedule data for the programs and projects. Application or App: A self-contained program or piece of software designed to fulfill a particular purpose, especially one that can be downloaded to a smartphone or mobile device. Automated Vehicles: These are defined by the US Department of Transportation (2013) as “those vehicles in which at least some aspect of a safety-critical control function (e.g., steering, throttle, braking) occurs without direct driver input.” Automated vehicles may be autonomous or self-driving (i.e., use only vehicle sensors) or may be connected (i.e., use communication systems, such as connected vehicle technology, in which cars and roadside infrastructure communicate wirelessly). (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, 2017). Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI): A long-range radio-frequency identification (RFID) or microwave identification system that automatically identifies vehicles having vehicle-mounted transponders (or tags) as they enter and pass through the range of the AVI system reader (the read zone) without any action by the driver. The term can also be used to refer to the system that records the time the vehicle enters and exits the read zone and summarizes the number of trips made by each operator. Best Practice: As used in this report, those innovative and creative practices that, if implemented, help achieve or support the relevant goals of airport management related to commercial ground transportation services. These include a broad range of standards, strategies, rules and regulations, business practices, fees, operational models or methods, facility configurations, supporting technologies, and other programs used by airport operators to provide, monitor, control, regulate, and enforce commercial ground transportation services. Deadhead Trip: A nonrevenue trip that occurs prior to picking up a customer or after dropping off a passenger. Commercial Ground Transportation: Ground transportation services that require customers to pay a fare for transportation to/from an airport directly (e.g., taxicabs or shared-ride vans), or the cost of the transportation is included in the service provided (e.g., hotel/motel or off-airport parking courtesy vans). Geofence: A virtual barrier around some portion of the airport defined by global positioning system (GPS) coordinates. Typically used to manage staging area operations. A geofence is used to track all entry, exit, pick-up, and drop-off activity on airport property. Hold Area: An area designated for use by commercial vehicles, such as TNCs, taxicabs, limousines, shared-ride vans, and buses/vans, to wait in (or stage) until they are called to the curbside. Large-, Medium-, and Small-Hub Airport: The FAA’s National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems classifies airports by size, defining four categories of airports by their activity (i.e., the percentage of the US annual passenger boardings), with a large hub serving 1.0 percent or more of the boardings; a medium hub serving at least 0.25 percent but less than 1.0 percent; a small hub serving at least 0.05 percent but less than 0.25 percent; and a non- hub serving more than 10,000 boardings but less than 0.05 percent.

ACRP 01-35: TNCS: IMPACTS TO AIRPORT REVENUES AND OPERATIONS AUGUST 19, 2019 FINAL DRAFT DELIVERABLE Reference Guide | E-2 | Appendix E Placard: An airport-issued sign displayed behind the passenger’s side front windshield or other location specified in airport rules, indicating the name of the TNC, vehicle license plate number, driver identification number, or other required information. Platform: Any hardware or software used to host an application or service. Transportation Network Company (TNC): A ground transportation corporation, partnership, sole proprietorship, or other entity, authorized by a statutory regulatory body, under which an operator provides prearranged, for-hire services for compensation through mobile device application technology that connects drivers of personal vehicles to passengers for transportation to and from an airport. Rematch: Within a defined number of minutes following a customer drop-off on the airport property, the TNC driver/vehicle is dispatched for a customer pick-up. The driver bypasses the staging. A rematch program is an effort to reduce customer wait times for pick-ups and to reduce deadheading and congestion on airport terminal area roads and curbs. Shared-Ride Van/Service: Door-to-door transportation, typically provided to and from an airport, for which the customer shares a vehicle with other parties (as opposed to family members or friends), with fares charged per passenger (as opposed to a fare for the use of an entire vehicle, as is the case with a limousine or chartered bus or van). Staging Area/Holding Area: A parking area, provided by an airport operator, for use by TNC drivers (or the drivers of taxicabs, limousines, and shared-ride vans) waiting to be assigned a customer; this is frequently the only airport location where drivers can receive a customer request. Trade Dress: With regard to TNCs, trade dress refers to the trademarked logos that must be displayed on or affixed to the front and/or rear windshield as required by local or airport regulations. Trip Fee: User fee charged to commercial ground transportation providers (for passenger pick-up and/or drop-off) so the airport operator can recover costs related to managing ground access services and providing adequate supporting facilities.

Transportation Network Companies (TNCs): Impacts to Airport Revenues and Operations Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

As of June 2019, transportation network companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft operate in the ground transportation markets at all major domestic commercial airports. The rapid emergence has presented multiple challenges to airport operators, states, regional transit authorities, and city governments.

The pre-publication draft of the TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's ACRP Research Report 215: Transportation Network Companies (TNCs): Impacts to Airport Revenues and Operations is designed to help airport operators develop and implement practical approaches to managing TNCs within the context of commercial ground transportation policies and programs. The report presents best practices that have proven to be effective tools that airport operators can use to manage TNC operations and develop sustainable revenue models. It particularly is designed to help airport operators evaluate the tradeoffs among customer service, revenue generation, current operations, and long-term facility planning.

Additional resources include a Mode Choice and Revenue Simulator Template spreadsheet and an accompanying dataset.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!