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Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports (2021)

Chapter: Appendix D - Emissions Reduction and Reporting Programs

« Previous: Appendix C - Examples of Emissions and Technology Roadmaps
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Emissions Reduction and Reporting Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
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Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Emissions Reduction and Reporting Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
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Page 88

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D-1   Emissions Reduction and Reporting Programs Voluntary emissions reduction programs allow businesses, colleges and universities, cities, countries, airports, and others to collectively join forces to reduce emissions and gain recogni- tion. These programs include pledges in which an organization publicly states an emissions goal to reach at a future date and accreditation programs that certify an organization meets the criteria of a given emissions level. To date, nine countries and one province have pledged to eliminate economy-wide emis- sions in the coming decades, while other countries have targeted specific sectors or end uses. A growing number of cities—such as those in the C40 Cities Coalition and the Carbon Neutral City Alliance—have announced carbon neutrality targets for 2050 (CNCA 2020). Hundreds of college campuses have committed to eliminating emissions, and architecture firms and other actors in the building sector have committed to carbon neutral buildings by 2030. The business community is also taking action by adopting “science-based targets” that encourage companies to phase out all GHG emissions by January 1, 2050. Table D-1 highlights key voluntary emis- sions reduction programs, organized by sector. A P P E N D I X D

D-2 Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports Table D-1. Voluntary emissions reduction milestones and programs. Sector Milestones Number of Commitments (as of January 2021) Airports • 2008: ACA program are established by Airport Council International (ACA 2018a). • 2012: Stockholm-Arlanda is considered the first airport to have achieved carbon neutrality (AB 2012). • 2015: As part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP21, 50 European airports pledged to be carbon neutral by 2030. By 2020, the number had grown to 211 airports (ACI 2020). • 2020: ACA program adds Level 4 and 4+. Two airports have been recognized as ACA Level 4+, and over 300 airports have been recognized at any ACA level. 211 European airports have made the 2030 carbon neutrality pledge (ACI 2020). Buildings • 2006: The American Institute of Architects establishes the 2030 Challenge (Architecture2030 2018). 175 architecture firms and several local governments have joined (Architecture2030 2018). Businesses • 1999: Carbon Neutral Certification (Carbon Neutral Network) established (since discontinued). • 2000: Shaklee Corporation is considered the first Climate Neutral certified business in April 2000. • 2015: Science -Based Targets Initiative established (partnership between CDP, United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute, World Wide Fund for Nature, We Mean Business Coalition) (CDP et al. 2020). 553 companies have joined the Science-Based Targets. Cities • 2014: Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (Urban Sustainability Directors Network) (CNCA 2020). 22 cities are part of the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA 2020). Colleges and Universities • 2006: American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (Second Nature and The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education). • 2007: College of the Atlantic in Maine becomes the first American school to achieve carbon neutrality (Gray 2018). Countries • 2017: Bhutan is considered the world’s first carbon negative country, due to its carbon sinks (CAT 2017). More than 110 nations have committed to carbon neutrality (United Nations 2020). Any Sector • 2001: Greenhouse Gas Protocol (GHGP) established by World Resources Institute and World Business Council for Sustainable Development. • 2006: International Organization for Standardization (ISO) establishes ISO 14064, standards for GHG accounting and verification (ISO 2006).

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Airports worldwide are setting aggressive zero- or low-emissions targets. To meet these targets, airports are deploying new strategies, adopting innovative financing mechanisms, and harnessing the collective influence of voluntary emissions and reporting programs. In tandem, new and affordable zero- or low-emissions technologies are rapidly becoming available at airports.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's pre-publication draft of ACRP Research Report 220: Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports covers all steps of roadmap development, from start to finish, using conceptual diagrams, examples, best practices, and links to external tools and resources. While the main focus of this Guidebook is airport‐controlled greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, it provides discussion about airport‐influenced emissions from airlines, concessionaires, and passengers.

Whereas other guidebooks and reference material provide airports with information on emissions mitigation and management (for example, the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airport Carbon Emissions Reduction, ACRP Report 11: Guidebook on Preparing Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories, and the Airport Council International’s Guidance Manual: Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management), this Guidebook articulates steps for creating an airport‐specific emissions roadmap.

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