National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports (2020)

Chapter: Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies

« Previous: Chapter 3: Setting Emissions Goal(s), Baseline(s), and Target(s)
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 44
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 45
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 46
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 47
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 48
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 49
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 51
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 52
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 53
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 54
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 55
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 56
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 57
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 58
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 59
Page 60
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 60
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 61
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 62
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 63
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 64
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 65
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 66
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 68

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

  37    Chapter 4: Emissions Reduction Strategies  This chapter provides guidance on identifying and prioritizing emissions reduction strategies. Because no  given set of emissions strategies will work for every airport, the focus of this chapter is on the process of  selecting the strategies (Figure 12), rather than the specific strategies themselves. Additionally, the  chapter discusses considerations to reduction Scope 3 emissions.   Chapter 4.1: Identify Emissions Reduction Options  Chapter 4.1 provides guidance on identifying emissions reduction options. Because there are far too  many technological, programmatic, and behavioral options to include in this Guidebook, the text below  provides a high‐level discussion about the various options. ACRP Synthesis 100 and ACRP Report 56  provide a much richer discussion about the GHG reduction strategies most often used at airports.   Best Practices for Emissions Reduction at Airports  The authors of this Guidebook conducted 20 interviews with airports and organizations working at the  forefront of airport emission planning. Below are key insights from these interviews.    Start with “low‐hanging fruit.” Some emission reduction initiatives pay for themselves over a  short time‐period (e.g., energy efficient lightbulbs). These should be the first initiatives  undertaken. See Marginal Abatement Curve below.    Mitigate then offset. Airport interviewees stressed the importance of looking for emission  mitigation strategies before offsetting. Interviewees noted that offsets reduce staff interest in  finding innovative and forward‐leaning mitigation strategies.    Ensure continual engagement with “C‐Suite.” As noted in airport interviews, senior management  involvement is critical to successful zero or low emission planning.    Seek strategies that produce co‐benefits. Interviewees stressed the importance of identifying  emission reduction strategies that maximize co‐benefits, such as improvement in air quality.    Practice adaptive management. Management strategies around emission reduction must change  as decision‐makers learn from experience and better information and as new analytic tools  become available.    Integration with planning “on the ground floor” Amsterdam Schiphol Airport noted the  importance of getting zero emissions objectives into the planning process “on the ground floor.”  This means incorporating zero emissions language into airport solicitations (e.g., Request for  Proposals), rather than waiting until a winning bidder is selected.  Chapter 4.1: Identify  Emissions Reduction Options    Chapter 4.2:  Prioritize  Emissions Reduction Options    Chapter 4.3: Consider  Scope 3 Emissions    Figure 12. Steps to Initiate Roadmap Planning. 

  38    The subsections below are organized into emission source types as defined in ACRP Report 56. Table 10  provides illustrative examples of emissions reduction strategies from different airport sources in each of  the different Scopes, though the Scopes can vary based on airport governance structures.  Table 10. Example Strategies to Address Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  Emissions Source  Type  Scope 1  Scope 2  Scope 3  Stationary sources   Energy efficiency improvements in  airport‐owned buildings   Clean heating and cooling  technologies in airport‐owned  buildings   Energy efficiency  improvements in  airport‐owned  buildings   Support for clean heating and  cooling investments by third  party operators  Surface vehicle  travel   Procurement of zero‐emission  vehicles for airport‐owned fleet  N/A   Provide incentives for taxis and  TNCs accessing airport with  zero‐emission vehicles   Support improved public  transit connections   Price airport road access and  rearrange terminal curb access  to disincentive single‐ occupancy vehicles  Purchased power  N/A   On‐site solar, wind,  or other renewable  energy development   Procurement of  renewable energy  credits (RECs) or  utility green pricing   Support procurement of RECs  by third party operators   Support procurement of  energy conservation measures  by tenants  Aircraft and GSE  emissions  N/A  N/A   Support use of sustainable  aviation biofuels and  infrastructure for electric GSE   Support alternative taxiing  approaches   Provide Infrastructure for Pre‐ Conditioned Air (PCA) and  Ground Power  Waste  management   Implementation of a composting  program for food waste, etc.   Implementation of a recycling  program  N/A   Support composting and  recycling by tenants through  information campaigns  Other   Carbon sequestration, e.g., forest  carbon management  N/A   Specify low‐emission  construction vehicles  Stationary Source Strategies  Stationary source strategies refer to approaches to reduce emissions through buildings owned by the  airport, typically through energy efficiency investments or investments in cleaner heating and cooling  technologies.  

  39    Energy Efficiency  Airports in search of emissions reduction strategies with low  costs and short payback periods should first consider energy  efficiency improvements to their existing facilities. In  particular, airports with older facilities built under less  stringent building codes are likely to find ample  opportunities to increase energy efficiency, resulting in  reduced emissions and costs. To reap the greatest benefits  from energy efficiency, airports should focus first on  efficiency improvements that are logistically easiest to  implement while simultaneously trying to improve those  systems where the greatest efficiency gain can be realized,  considering opportunities across all systems:   Automation/controls   Operations and maintenance   Energy sources   Heating, cooling, and ventilation   Electrical loads (plug and process loads)   Building envelope  ACRP Synthesis 21 documents low‐cost energy efficiency practices implemented by airports across all  systems listed above. The report also includes a matrix of the practices with indicators for cost and  payback period (ACRP 2010b). Table 11 provides a summary example of such an analysis. Each of the  measures shown in the table has a different payback period, with some of the measures paying back  very quickly and others taking ten years or more.   Airports can also refer to ACRP Report 56 for a listing of energy efficiency strategies for airports, such as  developing energy performance contracting partnerships, improving insulation of the airport building  envelope, LED lighting for runways and taxiways, installing automated building control systems or  variable frequency drives, and developing and marketing an energy conservation program for building  users. Appendix A to ACRP Report 56 details information about each strategy, including financial  considerations, implementation considerations, potential impacts, potential limitations, and case study  examples (ACRP 2011b). Additionally, the Sustainable Airport Manual developed by the Chicago  Department of Aviation includes energy efficiency measures as part of its rating system, accompanied by  case studies for certain measures. The case study focused on energy efficiency efforts at Los Angeles  World Airports (LAWA) details that LAWA has upgraded 80% of its building air handling units with  variable speed drives, 60% of computer servers to high efficiency servers, and has retrofitted buildings  with energy efficient lighting (Chicago Department of Aviation 2014).   Implementing Energy Efficiency First  For many airports, their first emissions  reduction effort involves addressing  stationary source emissions through  energy efficiency. Following their first  climate plan in 2008, Amsterdam Airport  Schiphol’s first initiative was to install  LED lighting and improve insulation of  buildings.   “The most sustainable energy is the  energy you don’t use.”  Denise Pronk, Program Manager,  Corporate Responsibility, Royal  Schiphol Group 

  40    Table 11. Sample Results of Lifecycle Cost Analysis for Potential ECMs.  Energy  Saving  Measure  Initial  Cost  Annual savings  Source of Annual Savings  Years to  payback  Net present  value (20  years)  Assumptions  Efficient  lighting  $50,000  $25,000  10 MW electricity savings,  labor savings of $1,000  2 years  $305,310    Cost of  electricity and  liquid fuels  increases at 3%  per year.  Interest rate of  3%. Rebates for  measures  included.  Building wall  and ceiling  insulation  $50,000  $5,000  600 gallons #2 fuel oil  reduction, 3,000 ft3 natural  gas, 26 MW electricity  10 years  $21,062  Window and  door sealing  $40,000  $4,000  500 gallons of #2 fuel oil,  2,000 ft3 natural gas, 24  MW electricity  10 years  $16,849  Efficient  furnaces  $60,000  $40,000 in year  one, $6,000  every year after  $40,000 rebate, 1,500  gallons of #2 fuel oil  3.5  years  $65,274  Clean Heating and Cooling Technologies  Heating, cooling, and ventilation can make up a substantial  portion of airport Scope 1 emissions as well as energy costs.  In general, an airport should approach heating, cooling and  ventilation improvements by beginning with the end state  and progressing toward the source (downstream to  upstream). In other words, the first step should be to reduce  heating or cooling demand through building envelope  improvements. The next step should be to pursue retrofits,  from the end points all the way back through the  distribution system, e.g., fixing leaky ducting and adding  zones. The final step would be to retrofit or replace the  sources, such as purchasing a new furnace or converting a  constant volume to a variable volume system. This is  important for two reasons: 1) the downstream  improvements are typically cheaper and faster payback, and  2) the result of the downstream improvements informs  subsequent measures upstream, such as by allowing the  purchase of a smaller furnace/boiler.   After investing in insulation and other building envelope  efficiency measures, an airport should consider addressing forced air duct leakage and potentially  adding heating zones. It is relatively inexpensive to limit those losses by sealing leaks and, where  feasible, insulating ducts. Zoned heating systems can save energy if parts of an airport building have  different temperature requirements and can be closed off from one another. A zoned system can  provide a different amount of heat to each zone, depending on its usage. There are several ways a  building can be zoned. Some multi‐zone systems have only one furnace/boiler and use electrically  controlled dampers, which can open or close depending on the heating needs of different zones. Other  systems have separate furnaces/boilers for each zone.   In the final step of source replacement, airports should consider switching to cogeneration (also known  as combined heat and power or CHP) uses an engine to generate electricity and recovers the waste heat  Airports Improving Efficiency of  Heating and Cooling  Nantucket Memorial Airport installed  efficient infrared heating units in  their garages. SFO is in the process of  getting a heat recovery chiller facility,  which will help with efficiency and  displace natural gas. Toronto Pearson  International Airport is installing  electric backup boilers for their  heating system. These offer the  airport a cleaner alternative to its  existing natural gas boilers, adds  redundancy to the system, and saves  the airport money because it can  switch to the electric boilers during  off‐peak hours when electricity is less  costly.  

  41    for use. Trigeneration (also known as combined cooling, heat and power or CCHP) is the simultaneous  production of electricity, heat and cooling from a single energy source. Similar to CHP, the waste heat  by‐product that results from electricity generation is captured and used for heating or cooling.  Cogeneration and trigeneration systems are typically more efficient than purchased electricity or fuel  because they utilize waste heat and avoid transmission losses. Canberra International Airport in  Australia installed a trigeneration system to provide power for four office buildings, resulting in the  reduction of more than 1,000 tons of CO2 emissions and $160,000 per year in energy costs (ACRP  2011b).   Ground‐source, or geothermal, systems can be used either to heat water or to heat or cool indoor  space. These systems use the ground as a heat source during the winter and a heat sink during the  summer due to the fact that ground temperatures remain relatively constant. Geothermal systems can  significantly reduce the amount of electricity or fuel needed to heat or cool a building, thus reducing  associated GHG emissions. Nantucket Memorial Airport installed a geothermal heating and air  conditioning system that allowed the airport to replace two oil‐burning furnaces and thus decrease GHG  emissions (ACRP 2011b).  ACRP Report 56 documents additional strategies to consider for clean heating and cooling, including  solar desiccant air conditioning systems, on‐site biomass energy systems, sewer heat recovery systems,  and using natural bodies of water for cooling. Airports are encouraged to review the description and  considerations included for each strategy to determine which ones may be feasible for their facilities.  Renewable Electricity Consumption  As the cost of renewable energy has declined, airports have increasingly had options to develop cost‐ effective projects on their property or purchase clean electricity from other projects. The development  of Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) have enabled airports to purchase long‐term clean energy  contracts, either for renewable energy generated on‐site or in some cases off‐site (requiring certification  and issuance of RECs). In 2018, the FAA updated its in‐depth guidebook for airport solar development,  documenting case studies from the 15 airports that have invested in solar technologies. It also provided  guidance on key issues for airports to navigate including glare and reflectivity issues that might cause  vision loss to pilots arriving or departing, or to Air Traffic Control personnel. Another issue detailed in  the Solar Guide is that electromagnetic interference with radar systems may create false signals and  communications interference (FAA 2018a).   An important source of guidance for airports on renewable energy strategies can be found in ACRP  Report 56. On‐site biomass energy production is one option for airports seeking renewable sources of  energy. An additional on‐site renewable energy source for airports is the installation of building‐ mounted wind turbines, although wind turbines can have land use compatibility issues with airports  given that wind potential is a function of tower height. Airports near water bodies may consider using  seawater for cooling or installing a tidal energy system. Airports may also consider utilizing geothermal  heating and cooling systems or geothermal snow and ice melting systems. Utilizing waste‐to‐energy  systems and gas produced from local landfills are other ways to recycle waste and produce valuable low‐ carbon electricity (ACRP 2011b). Detailed guidance on renewable energy alternatives is further outlined  in the ACRP Report 56. 

  42    Depending on where an airport is  located, it may be able to buy a  green pricing product or green  marketing product from the  electricity provider. The airport  will pay a small premium in  exchange for electricity generated  from renewable power resources.  The premium covers the increased  costs incurred by the power  provider, i.e., electric utility, when  adding green power to its power  generation mix.3 The purchase of  green power to address remaining  carbon emissions has both  benefits and potential drawbacks  that should be weighed.   Surface Vehicle Travel  Surface vehicle travel emissions  refers to emissions from airport‐ operated airside support vehicles, airport fleet vehicles, and airport‐operated buses. The breakdown of  the vehicle mix for each airport is likely different, but this category may also include ground support  equipment. In a survey of 33 U.S.‐based airports, ACRP Synthesis 85 showed that the most common  alternative fuels in airport‐operated surface vehicles are natural gas and biofuels, but that that battery  electric and plug‐in hybrid electric vehicles are the fastest growing fuel type (ACRP 2017a). Tools and  resources to inform a BCA analysis when comparing conventional versus alternative fuel project options  are presented in Table 12.                                                                  3 In competitive markets, airports can choose to purchase green marketing products from providers other than  their local utility. In regulated markets, airports may be able to buy a green pricing product from their local utility.   Electricity Grid Mix Considerations  When evaluating stationary source strategies or renewable  electricity projects, it is vital to consider the electricity grid mix.  If the grid mix includes large amounts of electricity generated  by burning coal, then projects improving efficiency or  switching to renewable electricity will have an outsized impact  compared to if the grid mix were heavily produced through  emission‐free hydropower. These considerations can have a  wide range of impacts. For example, in Montreal where  electricity is heavily generated via hydropower and thus nearly  emission‐free, switching heating and cooling to electricity  might make sense and have a larger impact than switching  heating and cooling to electricity when the grid mix is coal‐ based. Similarly, for Austin‐Bergstrom International Airport  (AUS), natural gas is so cheap and prevalent in Texas for  building heat that switching to electricity for heat—even when  it is emission‐free wind‐generated electricity—does not make  business sense. However, AUS may still consider renewable  natural gas to reduce emissions.  

  43    Table 12. Alternative Fuel Analysis Tools and Resources.  Title  Author  Description  Alternative Fuel Price Report  DOE  (2018)  The Alternative Fuel Price Report provides alternative and conventional fuel  prices (by region) for CNG, biodiesel, ethanol, propane, hydrogen, gasoline, and  diesel.  VICE 2.0: Vehicle and  Infrastructure Cash‐Flow  Evaluation Model  DOE  (2018)  This tool, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, allows fleet  managers to evaluate the financial implications of converting their fleet to be  CNG‐fueled.   Vehicle Cost Calculator  DOE  (2018)  This tool lets users calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for specific  vehicles, including advanced technology and alternative fuel vehicles.  EV Charging Financial Analysis Tool  C2ES  (2015)  This tool helps users evaluate the fiscal performance of electric vehicle (EV)  charging infrastructure investments that have multiple private and public sector  participants.  Waste Management  As waste materials decay in landfills or get burned in incinerators, they release GHGs. Airports are  encouraged to adopt waste management tactics to reduce emissions from the waste stream, including  recycling, composting, waste reduction efforts, and improvements to wastewater treatment facilities  where applicable. Strategies may include a solid waste management plan, a waste reduction and  recycling program, separating and composting food waste, and others that can help reduce methane  (CH4) and other GHGs from the waste stream (ACRP 2011b).   Airports can adopt numerous policies and practices along each step in the hierarchy that will reduce  emissions related to materials management. Airports can realize a much larger impact by coordinating  with entities that generate waste outside of the airport’s direct control, such as concessionaires and  airlines. As a first step, airports should focus on source reduction and reuse, since generating fewer  waste materials reduces emissions associated with waste collection, transportation, and disposal.  Source reduction and reuse avoid emissions regardless of whether materials would have been processed  for disposal or recycling. In addition to materials management, airports with wastewater treatment  facilities have opportunities to reduce emissions by converting output gases to usable energy. Airport  wastewater treatment systems that have anaerobic digesters to treat de‐icing fluids may use the  methane generated from the digesters to  produce heat or electricity instead of venting  the methane to the atmosphere. The Albany  airport has implemented such a system (ACRP  2011b). Airports can apply this waste‐to‐ energy concept to solid waste materials too.  Gatwick Airport constructed an on‐site  materials recycling facility which increases the  airport’s reuse and recycling rate and  converts waste to low‐carbon energy  (Gatwick 2016). In the future, airports may be  able to supply their solid waste as jet fuel  feedstock, partnering with companies that  apply a Fischer‐Tropsch technology to convert  this feedstock to jet fuel. Additional  Airport Waste Management Resources   National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and  Medicine 2018. Airport Waste Management and  Recycling Practices. Washington, DC: The National  Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25254   National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and  Medicine 2013. Recycling Best Practices, A  Guidebook for Advancing Recycling from Aircraft  Cabins. Washington, DC: The National Academies  Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/22499   FAA, Recycling, Reuse, and Waste Reduction at  Airports—A Synthesis Document, 2013.   SanMartin, F., and D. Rinsler. Guidance on Airport  Recycling, Reuse, and Waste Reduction, FAA, 2014. 

  44    information regarding waste management best practices is available in the ACRP Synthesis Report 92:  Airport Waste Management and Recycling Practices.   Other  Other emissions sources at airports might include construction activities, firefighting training exercises,  refrigerant leaks, and others. Even relatively small emission quantities of GHGs like methane and  refrigerants have significant outsized climate impacts due to their higher Global Warming Potentials— about 2,000 times higher in the case of common refrigerants—compared to CO2 (CARB 2019).  Construction activities result in GHG emissions through many of the same mechanisms as discussed  above: fossil fuel combustion by construction vehicles, processing and disposal of construction waste,  and lighting and other energy uses. Airports can reduce construction emissions through policies that  require the use of low‐emission construction vehicles and equipment, recycling and reuse of  construction materials, and use of energy efficient lighting during the construction process, for example  (ACRP 2011b). As part of its Chicago O’Hare Modernization Program (OMP), the Chicago Department of  Aviation (CDA) implemented tailpipe emissions standards for construction equipment that were later  adopted as citywide policy. CDA incorporated the standards into construction bid documents and  established an enforcement mechanism by requiring emissions documentation to be attached to  invoices prior to approval. Even though CDA was not mandated to, it required the use of ultra‐low sulfur  diesel (ULSD) for certain vehicles when the OMP began because air quality was a priority for such a large  project. These policies not only reduced GHG emissions and criterial pollutants, but also may have  bolstered the market for ULSD (Chicago Department of Aviation 2014).  Firefighting exercises at airports typically involve firefighters training in a live‐fire environment. These  training exercises result in criteria pollutant emissions from fuel burns and GHG emissions from fire  suppression chemicals. To reduce both types of emissions, airports are encouraged to work with training  staff to optimally plan exercises such that the minimum amount of fuel is used while still providing  necessary training. The EPA, in partnership with four major associations representing the fire protection  industry, developed a voluntary code of practice to minimize emissions of two GHGs used as fire  protection agents: hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs). The emissions reduction  strategies in the code of practice include adopting maintenance practices that reduce leakage as much  as technically feasible, limiting discharge for system testing to what is essential for performance  requirements or required by regulation, and ensuring that technicians who handle equipment  containing HFCs and PFCs are trained to minimize emissions. Criteria pollutant emissions from  firefighting training exercises vary based on the amount and type of fuel burned. To reduce emissions,  airports should strive to use minimum quantities of fuel necessary and the cleanest burning fuels  available, to the extent feasible.  Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and HFCs and are two GHGs used in refrigeration and air  conditioning systems. HFCs and HCFCs are emitted during operation, repair, and disposal, unless  recovered, recycled, and ultimately destroyed (EPA 2016c). Airports can take several steps to minimize  the release of these GHGs, including utilizing natural refrigerants where possible, installing intelligent  fault diagnosis systems to detect leaks, using vapor compression heat pumps, and installing  microchannel tube, heat exchangers to reduce the number of refrigerants used. Guidance for each of  these strategies can be found in ACRP Report 56 (ACRP 2011b).  

  45    Carbon Offset Programs   A carbon offset program is one that “reduces, avoids, or sequesters GHGs in order to compensate for  emissions occurring elsewhere” (Ritte 2011). These programs can be made up of myriad project types,  from supporting forestry expansion to renewable energy. Often there are markets where entities can  trade accredited offsets, essentially allowing them to purchase the right to say they reduced emissions  without actually having undertaken the emissions reduction project. Being accredited is the official  acknowledgement that one ton of CO2 emissions were displaced. Some regulating bodies use offsets as  a way to regulate carbon emissions (as opposed to a flat tax on carbon, or other approaches). One such  example of this is CORSIA (discussed in Chapter 1.2), which has established voluntary goals for 2021‐ 2026 and mandatory offset minimums for 2027‐2035 (ICCT 2017).   Airports can adopt carbon offset projects voluntarily or in response to compliance measures.  Compliance‐based carbon reduction programs, such as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) in  North America, are regulated by mandatory international, national, or regional entities to require  participants to reduce or offset CO2 emissions (ACRP 2011a). Demand for compliance‐based carbon  offsets is created by a regulatory instrument (CORE 2019). Carbon offset market participation and  demand can be also driven voluntarily by national, regional, organizational, or individual interest in CO2  emissions reductions, though there are no rules or regulations established for voluntary offset trading  (CORE 2019).  The ACA is one of several organizations that acknowledges airports that reduce their emissions of  carbon. In December 2018, the organization published Issue 1 of the “Offsetting Guidance Document” to  provide airports users with a concise overview on the global carbon offsetting management  accreditation program, guidance on offsetting options, key offsetting quality criteria and  recommendations, and practical and applicable  support (ACA 2018b). The document includes  term definitions, examples of carbon offset  project types and GHG mitigation actions  ranked by level of confidence, procurement  guidelines, a list of independently‐verified  offset programs, and more. Although there is a  cost to becoming ACA‐certified, airports can  utilize the resources and framework without  obtaining the official certification. This can be a  great way to get started and realize some of  the benefits of zero or low emission planning  for any airports that are financially or  otherwise resource constrained.   Offsets and Revenue Diversion  The FAA considers use of airport revenue for costs  associated with airport carbon accreditation programs,  including the voluntary purchase of carbon offsets, within  the boundaries of permitted operational costs as  discussed in the Revenue Use Policy (64 Fed. Reg. 7696,  February 16, 1999). When these costs are directly and  substantially related to the airport, (i.e. the carbon  offsets purchased are based on the carbon generated by  the airport) the benefit of the offset accrues directly to  the airport sponsor. 

  46    According to the ACA offsetting guidance,  there are several criteria that may be used to  evaluate the quality of a carbon offset program  (ACA 2018b). The criteria can be separated into  “mandatory” and “optional” categories.  “Mandatory” criteria include additionality,  which refers to whether the offset project’s  emissions reductions resulted in emissions  reductions below what would have occurred in  the absence of the project, as well as  permanence of the emissions reductions and  whether they are irreversible. Another  criterion is ensuring the offset project does not  cause negative environmental or social externalities which may include higher GHG emissions outside of  the project boundary. Procedurally, two criteria which should be mandatory for offset projects are  establishing ownership within the program so that double counting of offsets does not occur and  ensuring emissions reductions are monitored, reported, and verified. There are ICAO consultations to  determine how CORSIA can work without the offsets from individual nations being counted towards  National Determined Contributions (NDCs).  Optional criteria that might be used to evaluate an offset program are the year in which an offset was  generated due to a higher level of confidence in more recent offset projects registered under the latest  standards, whether the project generates co‐benefits by contributing the UN SDGs beyond climate  action, and whether the project is located in least developed countries due to higher potential for  co‐benefits in those locations.   The organization allows the use of four types of offset instruments, detailed below. For all carbon offset  instruments, one unit is equal to one metric ton of CO2 equivalent.   Certified Emissions Reduction (CER)  A Certified Emissions Reduction (CER) is a certificate issued by the United Nations to member nations for  preventing one ton of CO2 emissions. The UN’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) allows Annex I  Parties, countries with developed or traditional economies, to purchase or trade CERs to help them  achieve emissions reduction targets under the Kyoto Protocol while supporting sustainable  development in developing countries. For projects to be CDM accredited and eligible for CERs, they  must create real, measurable, and long‐term benefits to climate change mitigation and produce  additional emissions reductions that would not have otherwise occurred. Companies can also purchase  CERs to contribute towards their own emissions reduction targets under mandatory emissions trading  schemes, such as the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), or voluntary schemes. CERs  will likely not be eligible for CORSIA so airports may wish to consider alternative options before pursuing  these over offsets.  European Union Allowance (EUA)  A European Union Allowance (EUA) is a tradable emissions credit that carries the right to emit one ton of  CO2e as part of the EU ETS. The EU ETS is the world’s first and largest cap‐and‐trade system for reducing  GHG emissions, in which EUAs are allocated to EU Member States for free or are auctioned and the  The Good Traveler  The Good Traveler is a nonprofit, established by and for  airports, that allows passengers to mitigate the  environmental impact of their flight through the  purchase of a carbon offset. Through the purchase of a  $2.00 Certified Carbon Offset, a passenger offsets the  carbon released in 1,000 miles of flying (or 400 miles of  driving). Funds generated through The Good Traveler  support projects that offset carbon, including renewable  energy, landfill carbon capture and reuse, and waste  composting, among others.  

  47    number of EUAs issued serves as a cap. European companies that emit more than their allowance must  purchase additional EUAs from other companies that have a surplus. Table 13 provides an overview of  carbon reduction instruments.   Proprietary Verified Emissions Reduction (VER)  Unlike CERs, ERUs, and EUAs, Verified Emissions Reductions (VERs) are exchanged in the voluntary  market, which function outside and in parallel of the regulatory market. VERs can be created under CDM  or under other standards (e.g., Gold Standard, Voluntary Carbon Standard, VER+) operating in the  voluntary market. CERs can be accepted in both the regulatory and voluntary market, but VERs are  accepted only in the voluntary market. Although the voluntary market is smaller and does not have  established rules and regulations, its lower development and transaction costs enable entities to  experiment with new methodologies and technologies under small projects.  Table 13. Overview of Carbon Offset Instruments.  Market  Transaction Type  Credit Type  Regime  Regulatory  Allowance‐based  European Union Allowance (EUA)  EU Emissions Trading Scheme  Project‐based  Certified Emissions Reduction (CER)  Clean Development Mechanism  Emissions Reduction Units (ERU)  Joint Implementation  Voluntary  Mainly project‐based  Proprietary Verified Emissions Reduction (VER)  Voluntary projects    Summary of Strategies to Address Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions  For additional information on strategies like those discussed in the preceding sections, Table 14  highlights important resources and reports that provide practical guidance for airports.      

  48    Table 14. Resources for Strategies to Address Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions.  Resource  St at io na ry  so ur ce s  Su rfa ce  v eh icl e  tra ve l  W as te  m an ag em en t  El ec tr ici ty  co ns um pt io n  Ai rc ra ft  em iss io ns   Ot he r  Of fs et s  ACRP Synthesis 21 (2010). Airport Energy Efficiency and Cost Reduction (ACRP, 2010).                 ACRP Synthesis 42 (2013) Integrating Environmental Sustainability into Airport Contracts  (ACRP 2013).                ACRP Report 56: Handbook for Considering Practical Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction  Strategies for Airports (ACRP 2011b).                ACRP Report 78. (2012). Airport Ground Support Equipment (GSE): Emission Reduction  Strategies, Inventory, and Tutorial (ACRP 2012).                ACRP Report 158. (2016). Deriving Benefits from Alternative Aircraft‐Taxi Systems (ACRP  2016b).                 Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance. (2018). Framework for Long‐Term Deep Carbon Reduction  Planning (CNCA 2018).                Chicago Department of Aviation. (2012). Sustainable Airport Manual.                Federal Aviation Administration. (2018). Technical Guidance for Evaluating Selected Solar  Technologies on Airports.                Federal Aviation Administration. (2012). Aviation Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction  Plan.                 IATA. (2013). Technology Roadmap.                ICCT (2018). Beyond road vehicles: Survey of zero‐emission technology options across the  transport sector (Hall et al. 2018).                Rocky Mountain Institute (2017). Innovative Funding for Sustainable Aviation Fuel at U.S.  Airports (Toussie and Klauber et al. 2017).                 Rocky Mountain Institute. (2017). The Carbon‐Free City Handbook (RMI 2017).                Sustainable Practices Library. Sustainable Aviation Guidance Alliance (SAGA) website  (SAGA 2018).                 Two of the more comprehensive resources of strategies for airport GHG emissions reduction include  Appendix A of ACRP Report 56 and SAGA (ACRP 2011b, SAGA 2018), though SAGA strategies include  broader sustainability efforts in addition to emissions reduction. ACRP Report 56 produced a handbook,  decision‐support tool, and a set of 125 emissions reduction strategy factsheets with case examples to  support airports in GHG emissions reductions (ACRP 2011b). While now several years old, many of the  compiled strategies are still relevant, and each factsheet contains helpful information about financial  considerations, implementation considerations, and potential emissions impacts. The Cadmus team also  reviewed the availability of emissions calculators and several tools, including emissions inventory tools,  project‐specific emissions evaluation tools, and cost‐benefits of emissions reduction strategies that exist  to assist airports in emissions planning, as described in Table 15.     

  49    Table 15. Sustainability Tools to Help Reduce Emissions at Airports.  Year  Name  Author  Description  2012  Handbook for Evaluating  Emissions and Costs of APUs  and Alternative Systems  ESA (2012)  This report includes guidance on emissions estimations at airports, as well as an Airport Emissions Estimator Tool.   2017  ACERT Model  ACI (2017)  ACERT is an Excel‐based tool that airports can use to calculate their own GHG emissions inventory.  2017  AEDT Model  FAA (2018b)  This software system models aircraft performance in space and time to  estimate fuel use, emissions, noise, and air quality consequences for  scenarios ranging from a single flight at an airport to global levels.  2017  GREET Model  Wang et al. (2017)  This full life‐cycle model evaluates energy and emissions impacts of  alternative transportation fuels and vehicle technologies.  2017  AFLEET Tool  Burnham (2017)  The AFLEET tool facilitates estimating petroleum use, GHG emissions, air  pollutant emissions, and cost of ownership of light‐duty and heavy‐duty  vehicles using simple spreadsheet inputs.  2014  MOVES2014b Model  EPA (2018)  This emissions modelling system estimates emissions for mobile sources  at the national, county, and project levels for criteria air pollutants,  GHGs, and air toxins.  2017  EMission FACtor (EMFAC)  Model  CARB  (2017)  This model is used to assess emissions from on‐road vehicles including  cars, trucks, and buses in California, and to support CARB’s regulatory  and air quality planning efforts.  2018  EV Emissions Calculator  UCS (2018)  This calculator compares emissions of plug‐in hybrid electric and battery  electric vehicles to gasoline‐only vehicles, by ZIP code and the make,  model, and year of a vehicle.  2016  Petroleum Reduction  Planning Tool  DOE (2018)  This tool assists fleet managers in helping them to plan to reduce fossil  fuel use and resulting GHG emissions.    Resources for other types of institutions may also be useful, particularly for overlapping sectors like  buildings or ground transportation. The Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance guidance document, as well as  the Rocky Mountain Institute’s Carbon‐Free City Handbook each offer outlines and links to in‐depth  resources for strategies from leading‐edge cities striving for zero emissions (Carbon Neutral Cities  Alliance 2017, Calhoun et al. 2017). Some strategies in these resources are about cities reducing their  own emissions, and others are more policy focused to incentivize or mandate change among the  broader public. These strategies may also be relevant for airports as they consider ways to cut Scope 3  emissions by guiding tenants and other third‐party actors, or as they consider partnerships with the  cities their airports serve.  Chapter 4.2: Prioritize Emissions Reduction Options   Chapter 4.2 focuses on the use of visualizations to prioritize emissions reduction strategies and convey  messages about the portfolio of strategies to stakeholders. Other research, like any of the references  cited in Chapter 4.1, provide additional quantitative methods for prioritization. Due to space  considerations, those methods are not described in detail in this Guidebook.   A powerful visualization that illustrates all energy supply, transformation, and end use at the airport in a  single page is the Sankey Diagram. As shown in Figure 13, Sankey Diagrams are useful for visualizing  energy balance or material flows and efficiency of conversions. The width of an arrow reflects the flow  quantity. The arrows show flows from one node to another, usually from left to right. Sankey Diagrams 

  50    are relatively simple to generate using a free online Sankey Diagram generator. A key insight for most  onlookers of Sanky Diagrams is the total quantity of energy lost due to efficiency losses relative to the  quantity used for productive energy services.   Figure 14 is a Wedge Stabilization Chart that shows different measures that can be taken to reduce GHG  emissions relative to a reference case. In the chart, the top line extending up and to the right represents  the path of emissions in one scenario (e.g., no action scenario). That positive emissions value is reduced  as each strategy is expand over time. In the figure, by 2035 the remaining emissions are zero. A Wedge  Stabilization Chart is a useful tool for visualizing the various impacts that strategies have on current GHG  emissions. Figure 15 is an example of a Waterfall Chart which shows how multiple emissions mitigation  strategies reduce emissions to the level of an emissions goal. Waterfall Charts show similar insights as  Wedge Stabilization Diagrams, except they do not show emissions reductions over time and are capable  of greater detail in showing various emissions reduction categories (e.g., the stacked columns in Figure  15 provide an extra layer of detail).     Figure 13. Example Sankey Diagram. Cadmus graphic using https://sankey.csaladen.es/. 

  51      Another method for showing or comparing various emissions reduction strategies is a Marginal  Abatement Cost (MAC) Curve. MAC curves are useful tools for presenting carbon emissions reduction  costs per ton of emissions mitigated. MAC curves like the example in Figure 16 are comprised of discrete  “blocks” that represent an individual carbon abatement measure. Blocks are organized by the marginal  Electricity    Stat. Srcs.  Waste Mgt.  Surf Veh          Other   Offsets  500,000    400,000    300,000    200,000    To ta l A irp or t E m iss io ns  (T on s C O 2 )  2020 Efficient  Lightbulbs  Building  Retrofit  Fleet  Electrification  Solar  Microgrid  Offsets  Residual  Emissions  Emission Goal        Figure 15. Example Waterfall Chart.  Energy Efficient Light  2020        2025    2030     2035    2040                 600,000    500,000    400,000    300,000    200,000  To ta l A irp or t E m iss io ns  (T on s C O 2 )  Building Retrofit  Fleet Vehicle Electrification  Solar Microgrid  Offsets  Remaining  Emissions  Figure 14. Example Wedge Stabilization Chart. 

  52    economic cost of emissions abatement ($/tCO2). The widths of each block reflect the amount of  potential carbon emissions abatement (tCO2).   A final method for visually comparing two or more emissions mitigation strategies is through a  qualitative diagram that strategies across different objectives. Table 16 is an example of a comparison  chart that uses Harvey Balls to convey the relative score. Similarly, heat maps or simple  up/down/left/right arrows help quickly turn a table with numeric values into a visually appealing  diagram for the reader.   Table 16. Example of Qualitative Evaluation Table using Harvey Balls.  Evaluation Criteria  Energy  Efficient  Light  Bulbs  Building  Retrofit  Fleet  Vehicle  Electrification  Solar  Microgrid  GHG Reduction Total  ◓  ◓  ●  ●  $ per Ton of GHG Mitigated  ◒  ○  ●  ●  Total Cost of Ownership  ●  ○  ◒  ◒  Ability to Reduce Criteria Pollutants  ◒  ○  ◓  ◓  Technology Readiness  ○  ◓  ◓  ○  Minimal Infrastructure Requirement  ●  ◒  ◒  ◒  Administrative Burden  ●  ○  ◒  ◒  Training Burden  ●  ○  ○  ○      Figure 16: Example Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) Curve. 

  53    Chapter 4.3: Consider Scope 3 Emissions  The single largest source of emissions come from aircraft. Aircraft design and airline operational  improvements have dramatically reduced fuel burn since the introduction of jet engines over 50 years  ago. On a per passenger basis, emissions are more than 80% lower than in the 1960s. However, total  GHG emissions from aircraft are growing due to demand, and the already accomplished efficiency gains  leave few opportunities for cost effective measures beyond those already in place. In fact, aviation may  be one of the costliest sectors to decarbonize, at an estimated $230/metric ton of CO2 abated (Energy  Transitions Commission 2018). Airlines also have limited ability to pay for additional actions given their  low margins and market dynamic that penalizes carriers who pursue high cost actions such as  accelerating fleet replacement.  While airports do not have direct control of aircraft usage, there are a few ways they can influence  industry emissions. The FAA estimates that approximately 5% of emissions occur while aircrafts are on  the ground or operating below 3,000 feet (FAA 2015). Airports can install and maintain ground power so  that aircraft shut off their auxiliary power units. They can also influence passengers to voluntarily offset  their own emissions over their entire flight distance. These two approaches are further detailed below.  General Considerations for Addressing Scope 3 Emissions  Certain emissions produced on airport property are under  control of the airport, while other emissions belong to a  tenant operating on the airport. In some instances, it can  be unclear which entity is responsible for the emissions, or  at which point in an operation the emissions transfer from  belonging to  the airport to  the tenant,  or from the  tenant to the  airport. As  such, it can  be unclear at  which point  the  emissions should no longer be considered in an airport’s  inventory. However, each airport will need to determine  for itself exactly where the bounds are for the emissions it  owns. Addressing Scope 3 emissions—or emissions not  directly under control of the airport—is still considered by  many to be important and of value. When most of the  community considers airport emissions reduction, they do  not think about the airport terminal itself but rather the  aircraft, the emissions from which are within Scope 3.   When an airport does not have direct control over  emissions but still wishes to influence and in turn reduce  Airport Authority Hong Kong (AAHK)   In seeking to reduce emissions not  directly under their control, Hong Kong  International Airport faces the challenge  of having 73,000 staff working who are  not under direct authority of the airport.  Furthermore, the airport has a large  amount of non‐aeronautical activity on  the airport— such that 40% of emissions  are from airport operations and 60% are  large on‐airport business partners.   SFO Adds Administrative Barriers   for Natural Gas   SFO has indicated to tenants that  nobody is getting money for natural gas  on airport property and they have made  it much more difficult to even get a  natural gas hookup, through  administrative barriers and other  hurdles. SFO is also looking at  decarbonizing cooking, specifically in  support of tenants. The airport just  hired a Sustainability Projects Specialist  that will take learnings from big capital  projects and detail that out for what  tenants can do with lease and  concession spaces. This person is  focused on commercial space  improvements and making sure no  permits are passed where tenants bring  natural gas on site.  SFO Adds Administrative Barriers   for Natural Gas   SFO has indicated to tenants that  nobody is getting money for natural gas  on airport property. and they have  made it much more difficult to even get  a natural gas hookup, through  administrative barriers and other  hurdles. SFO is also looking at  decarbonizing cooking, specifically in  support of tenants. The airport just  hired a Sustainability Projects Specialist  that will take learnings from big capital  projects and detail that out for what  tenants can do with lease and  concession spaces. The Sustainability  Projects Specialist is focused on  commercial space improvements and  ensuring no permits are passed where  tenants bring natural gas on site. 

  54    those emissions, there are several challenges that must be faced. First, the staff performing work related  to those emissions not under the airport’s control are also not under the airport’s direction. For any  strategy that the airport seeks to implement, they will need to go through these third parties and  tenants. This process only becomes more arduous as the layers of subcontractors increase. The level of  effort to influence these emissions also varies greatly based on airport context, namely:    The extent of duties under the airport’s purview or not (i.e., number of employees working  related to the duties; some airports operate the GSE themselves, some have tenants do it).   The level of political or contract influence an airport has over the tenant.   The congeniality of the working relationship between the airport and tenant.  Reducing emissions beyond airports’ direct control requires some creativity and novel approaches. It  requires continual monitoring of opportunities and leveraging any clout in a relationship with whichever  party does have direct control over those emissions. This could take the form of integrating emissions  reduction goals into contracts.   Airport Authority Hong Kong Data Tracking and Sharing Platform  In 2011, Airport Authority Hong Kong built a carbon audit system that enables it to track, understand,  set a reduction target and report on “airport‐wide” emissions of 53 airport business partners (ABPs)  (Figure 17). Each company has their own password protected space on the platform, and AAHK only  discloses the collective performance of the whole airport community. This builds trust with the partners  to share data. AAHK provides the software for free and offers free training. Participating ABPs upload  their data every six months.    Figure 17. Airport Authority Hong Kong Data Tracking and Sharing Platform. 

  55    In many cases where an airport cannot directly mandate that a tenant take efforts to reduce emissions,  they can encourage emissions reduction through positive reinforcement and awards. Simply being  prepared and available to assist when the tenants decide they want to pursue an emissions reduction  strategy can be an option, which is how SFO is approaching SAF. Some airports have sought to educate  tenants by paying for consultants or energy analysts to come in and offer free evaluations to the  tenants, showing those parties how they could save money from efficiency measures that reduce  emissions. Another potential strategy is to reduce administrative and logistical barriers to support  emissions reduction (such as installing electric vehicle chargers).   Considerations for reducing emissions beyond an airports’ direct control in specific, major areas are  discussed in the following sections.   Ground Support Equipment  ACRP Report 78 documents the various types of ground  support equipment (GSE), functions, suppliers, and  ultimately strategies to reduce emissions from these  vehicles (ACRP 2012). Emissions from GSE can create  more localized air quality impacts so have been a concern  of airport stakeholders and are subject to federal and  state emissions regulations. One set of strategies that has  been documented is equipment‐related, such as  aftertreatment technologies or incorporating GSE  functions into the airport infrastructure. This might  include terminal gate electrification projects, such as  replacing diesel‐powered air conditioning units with fixed  pre‐conditioned air (PCA) systems or minimizing diesel‐ powered ground power units (GPUs) and aircraft start  units (ASU) use at the gate through providing 400 Hz  electrical systems.   Other sets of strategies include replacing GSE with  alternative‐fuel vehicles and taking steps to reduce  extensive idling common for some airports. Not all GSE is  airport‐owned, some is owned by airlines or their  subcontractors. Airports could undertake strategies to  incentivize or mandate cleaner GSE operations by airlines  or other tenants, including via emissions fees and tenant  lease agreements, though there are often challenges  associated with the implementation of such strategies.   Airports should be aware that there can be space or  infrastructure constraints that affect implementing GSE  emissions reduction strategies. For example, certain  airports may be space‐constrained on the ramp and find it  challenging to install enough chargers to fully electrify the  GSE operation. Equipment typically has to charge overnight and remain parked near the chargers. Highly  Alternative Fuels for Surface Vehicles  at Airports   Numerous airports, such as DFW and  SFO, are already using alternative fuels.  They use renewable natural gas (RNG)  to power compressed natural gas (CNG)  bus fleets. DFW took half steps towards  renewable energy, as it was not  available for use at first, switching from  diesel to CNG, and eventually to RNG  when it became available. The first step  of switching from diesel to CNG, which  offered some but not a total reduction  of emissions, laid the foundation for  DFW to ultimately shift to RNG.   Airports Reducing GSE Emissions  Through the “EV100” initiative, Hong  Kong International Airport is one of  many airports beginning to implement  electrified GSE. In 2018, HKG had 240  pieces of electric GSE equipment and is  now working to continue expanding this  electrified fleet. Indira Ghandi  International Airport is employing  Taxibots, which are electric semi‐ robotic, pilot‐controlled towing  tractors, in an effort to reduce  emissions from GSE taxiing planes to  the runway.  

  56    congested airports such as Seattle may especially need to consider these constraints. Energy supply can  also be an issue for older facilities, requiring the local utility to potentially upgrade substations feeding  the airport.     Electric, hybrid‐electric, and natural gas vehicles have the highest potential for emissions reduction and  are typically the preferred choice for airports looking to transition to alternative fuel vehicles from GSE.  In recent years there has been an increase in the viability of electrification of GSE, sometimes referred to  as eGSE, due to the lowered emissions from electricity supplies in most areas of the United States, as  well as the improvement of electric vehicle technology and reduction in costs. Electrification is an  appropriate alternative for GSE because it would increase fuel efficiency overall based on the frequency  in stopping and starting among equipment, the amount of idle time, and required short ranges. For  auxiliary loads, electric power sources can be more efficient than diesel include hydraulic lifts,  refrigeration, and pumps. Electric GSE is most frequently used as an alternative for pushbacks, belt  loaders, container loaders, luggage tugs, lavatory trucks, and water trucks. Furthermore, electric  chargers can be installed safely in comparatively more locations around the airport relative to the  number of existing and centralized diesel refueling stations, so this is beneficial from a usage perspective  because it limits GSE traffic and non‐productive travel. For more detail on eGSE, please refer to the U.S.  Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Electric Ground Support  Equipment at Airports factsheet from 2017.   Ground Access Vehicles  Ground access vehicles (GAVs) refer to landside ground  transportation at an airport, and includes vehicles utilized by  and for airline passengers, airport employees, airline or airport  tenants, and freight delivery (ACRP 2017d). These vehicles can  include private vehicles, rental cars, taxis, transportation  network companies (TNCs), door‐to‐door vans, hotel shuttles,  public transport, service and delivery vehicles, and air cargo  vehicles. Strategies to reduce emissions from GAVs include  improved public transit, walking, and bicycle connections,  consolidated rental car facilities, incentives for employees to  take public transit, walk, or bicycle to work, incentives for  passengers, taxis, limousines, TNCs, or employees arriving in  zero emission vehicles, conversion of vehicles like airport  shuttles to alternative fuel vehicles, and avoiding construction of  new parking capacity (Chicago Department of Aviation 2012).   One strategy to reduce emissions from GAVs is to consider the  taxicab and limousine companies that airports work with and  the fuel types those companies rely on. The vehicle ownership  model for these companies can impact the degree that  companies are able to implement clean vehicle policies including which types of vehicles are used.  Ground transportation companies that own their vehicles are in a better position to implement clean  vehicle policies than companies that allow drivers to use their own vehicles. If airports have a clear  preference for fuel type to help them advance their sustainability goals, they may encourage private  Airport Fleet Vehicles  Airport fleet vehicles occupy a unique  niche among all vehicle fleets, with  hundreds or even thousands of diverse  vehicles. Emissions inventories suggest  fleet vehicles are one of the primary  sources of emissions at airports. For  example, at the Philadelphia (PHL), Los  Angeles (LAX), and Minneapolis‐St. Paul  (MSP) International Airports, fleet  vehicles account for 38%, 43%, and 45%  of Scope 1 emissions, respectively.  Besides helping reduce emissions,  alternative fuels can help airports  manage fuel costs, reduce petroleum  dependence, increase energy security,  improve public image, and potentially  reduce maintenance efforts.  

  57    ground transportation providers to adopt that vehicle fuel type. Another strategy for airports is to  implement anti‐idling policies or have steps to reduce vehicle idling, including free parking and  comfortable rest areas. Additionally, airports may also encourage private ground transportation  operators to implement strategies to decrease the number of empty rides, or trips without passengers,  that drivers take. Airports may also choose to require fuel emissions standards, a minimum vehicle fuel  economy, or offer financial incentives for using alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) or penalties for not using  them. ACRP Synthesis 89 provides more detailed guidance on several of these policy options (ACRP  2018b).   Amsterdam Airport Schiphol has targeted taxi electrification and in 2018 is served by 167 Tesla Model S  taxis. The airport has heard positive reviews from  customers about the comfort and from the operators  because of reduced maintenance costs. Amsterdam  Airport Schiphol also operates electric buses and  reports positive customer feedback because of the  reduced diesel fumes and noise. Furthermore, there are  electric buses operating to and from communities  around the airport. Though the airport has little  influence on community transit agencies, it managed to  sway the decision‐makers and help obtain a zero‐ emission requirement for the community buses. As of  2018, these adjacent communities operate 100 electric  buses. The airport believes that having adopted its own  electric buses early on helped “prove” the viability of  electric buses to adjacent communities.  Like Schiphol, other airports and agencies are increasingly  looking to deploy electric and fuel cell buses as a zero  emissions solution. Zero‐emission buses (ZEBs) emit no  tailpipe GHG or criteria pollutant emissions and can be  more fuel efficient than conventional bus technologies.  On a lifecycle basis, ZEBs can offer substantial reductions  in GHG and most criteria pollutant emissions over diesel,  diesel hybrid, and compressed natural gas buses. These  reductions offer numerous health benefits, as diesel  pollution has been found to increase the incidence of  asthma, cancer, and heart disease, and cause higher  mortality rates. Moreover, as renewable energy prices fall  and Renewable Portfolio Standards increase, the  electricity grid becomes cleaner each year, meaning  electric buses connected to the grid also generate fewer  emissions over time.   Airports can enact many proactive strategies during ZEB planning to identify cost‐effective technology  solutions suited to their operating contexts. For example, by conducting route modeling and schedule  San Diego’s (SAN) Shuttle, Taxi and TNC  Emissions Reduction Program  SAN began with requiring emissions  reductions from taxi and shuttle fleets  accessing the airport in 2012. The fleets  report on a monthly basis (with the make  and model of vehicle, and other  information) and emissions intensities are  calculated. In subsequent years, TNCs  have become part of the program too. In  2018, all TNCs were meeting the goal.   California Air Resources Board  (CARB) Zero Emission Airport Shuttle  Program  CARB proposed a rule requiring fixed  route airport shuttles at California’s 13  largest airports to transition to 100%  zero‐emission vehicles (ZEVs) by 2035.  This applies to both public and private  fleets, including operators of parking  facilities, rental car agencies, and  hotels. The regulation includes a phased  approach, with required percentage of  fleets increasing incrementally until  2035. 

  58    analysis, airports can avoid procuring buses with larger batteries than necessary; hence they may be  able to invest in lower‐capacity chargers that reduce electrical upgrade costs and demand charges.   Additionally, agencies who have already been deploying ZEBs are experimenting with software  integrations or battery storage solutions that similarly can help reduce upfront electrical upgrade costs  as well as ongoing demand charges. During implementation, airports exploring early adoption of ZEB  technologies will need to identify strategies to successfully train operators and maintenance staff,  integrate bus charging into their scheduling, and ensure resilience during power outages.  Aircraft Emissions Strategies  Strategies to reduce emissions from aircraft can include technological improvements to aircraft,  reducing airport ground movement strategies through operational or technological approaches and by  adopting cleaner fuels.  Aircraft Ground Movement Strategies  One of the most significant examples of this is with the aircraft. Most often, emissions from a plane in its  landing and takeoff cycle (LTO)—typically when the plane is below 3,000 feet of altitude—are  considered within the purview of that airport (ACRP 2009).  Although the majority of aircraft fuel is consumed during flight, European studies estimate that  airplanes spend 10% to 30% of flight time taxiing. Strategies to reduce aircraft emissions during other  flight phases include reduced takeoff and climb thrust, increased efficiency during airport taxiing such as  through reducing engine use, improved operational efficiency through programs like the FAA’s Next  Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), and replacement of main engines for taxiing with  systems such as alternative aircraft‐taxiing systems or equipment similar to aircraft pushback tractors.  Single engine taxi is the most prevalent approach to reducing taxiing emissions.  In a recent ACRP review of alternative taxiing systems, Fordham et al. highlight the potential for several  technology and efficiency strategies to reduce GHGs and criteria pollutants, particularly electrified  technologies, yet also highlight the operational and fiscal challenges airlines and airports may face in  implementing such strategies (ACRP 2016b). The technologies studied include dispatch taxiing (e.g.,  using existing aircraft pushback tractor technology), semi‐robotic dispatch taxiing (i.e., similar to a  pushback tractor but using a hybrid external large tractor developed specifically for taxiing), nose‐wheel‐ mounted alternative aircraft‐taxiing systems, and main landing gear alternative aircraft‐taxiing systems.  NextGen is a comprehensive effort to increase operations efficiency and reduce emissions that includes  airspace, operational, and infrastructure improvements. Operational improvements designed to reduce  fuel use include more precise flight paths, continuous descent arrivals that require less engine thrust,  and overall airspace optimization that have already been implemented and resulted in documented  reduction of fuel use at U.S. airports (FAA 2012).  In the long run, airports can also incorporate more efficient design into airfield and runway layout to  reduce congestion and delays (ACRP 2011b).   Sustainable Aviation Fuel  The aviation industry has jointly made a commitment to reduce GHGs through efficiency measures and  voluntarily submitted themselves to a carbon market to allow for carbon neutral growth starting in 2020  through CORSIA. As advanced technology becomes available, to the aviation sector is targeting a 50% 

  59    reduction in 2050 relative to 2005 global totals. Therefore, airlines are seeking to reduce their carbon  emissions. Using alternative fuels is currently one of the only ways to achieve these goals. Therefore,  there may be congruent goals for airlines and airports to integrate SAF into airport operations. It should  be noted that airlines will seek to receive credit for sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) usage under CORSIA  and therefore the airports will need to be cognizant of this to avoid double‐claiming of emissions  reductions that are already claimed by the airlines.   Drop‐in SAF can be used safely in commercial  aircraft without modification, and can be produced  sustainably with renewable feedstocks, including  used cooking oil, tallow, energy crops, agricultural  and forestry residues, and municipal waste (Toussie  and Klauber et al. 2017). Furthermore, for many  SAFs, when the fuel is burned there are substantial  reductions in criteria pollutants such as PM and  SOx, as well as modest reductions in unburned  hydrocarbons. In recent years there have been  several advances toward commercially viable SAF,  including the inauguration of the first commercial‐ scale SAF refinery in the United States, the enabling  of credits for SAF under government incentive  programs at the federal (RFS2) and state (LCFS)  levels, and approval of five different fuel  production pathways through the ASTM D7566  specification of synthetic turbine fuels.   While there is a growing interest among airports and airlines in moving beyond just demonstration  projects with SAF to incorporation into daily operations, several related barriers have kept SAF from  penetrating the market, including low production volume, high prices compared to conventional jet fuel,  and infrastructure costs for transporting and blending. One production pathway depends on fats, oils,  and greases which poses a potential challenge because they are in limited supply. This energy source is  likely to become more expensive in the future as supply remains stable yet demand grows, and  therefore lipid prices increase. However, the price of petroleum will greatly affect investment in further  alternative fuel research, development, and production, as a rise in conventional jet is beneficial to SAF  pricing.   As of 2019, there is an insufficient supply of SAF to significantly reduce industry’s emissions. However,  several biofuel producers are working to ramp up production. As of 2018, several production facilities  were under construction. According to CAAFI, while the planned increases in production of SAF are  modest, they are still meaningful and vital steps forward toward proving the viability of the fuels, which  will further open capital markets.   The Port of Seattle has set a goal to power every flight fueled at Seattle‐Tacoma International Airport  with at least a 10% blend of sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) by 2028 (Port of Seattle 2019). In 2016, SEA  commissioned a study to assess the feasibility of fueling infrastructure sufficient to reach that goal,  which would enable receipt, blending, storage, and delivery of an 80% jet fuel, 20% biofuel blend. The  General Aviation Leadership on Scope 3  Los Angeles Van Nuys Airport, a general  aviation facility, has committed to reducing  GHG emissions five percent below 2013  levels by 2025. To date, VNY has replaced 48  percent of fleet vehicles with cleaner, low‐  or zero‐emission vehicles. In 2018, VNY  worked with a solar developer to complete a  1.5 megawatt onsite solar project. Six other  tenant solar projects are underway. In 2019,  VNY became the first GA airport to supply  sustainable alternative jet fuel to aircraft  operators, and as of summer 2019, six VNY  tenants are certified in the Los Angeles  Green Business Program (LAWA 2019). 

  60    study highlighted some of the complex supply chain and infrastructure challenges associated with  biofuels, as well as the importance of partnerships to enable aircraft emissions reduction strategies.  In addition to infrastructure challenges, SEA has been working to address funding and financing barriers  to achieving sustainable biofuel adoption (Toussie and Klauber et al. 2017). The report highlights the  important role that airports can play in supporting SAF use, because they are able to support  coordination for common infrastructure investments.  Fundamentally, airports do not need to change anything in order to enable receipt of SAF, as these  drop‐in fuels are fully fungible with conventional fuels up to their specified blend levels (indicated in the  ASTM specification). However, CAAFI has indicated that the airport community is still determining how  they might facilitate the expanded adoption of alternative fuels. Airports Council International – North  America is a sponsor of CAAFI and a good resource for airports to coordinate with to identify  opportunities. In addition, airports with higher ambition can assist in evaluating infrastructure options  that could accelerate the uptake of fuel at their site, or region, for which the airport might have  influence or ownership (Port Authority property). Airports could consider:    Whether the airport has infrastructure to integrate locally produced and delivered fuel into the  fuel farm   Whether the airport positioned to enable blending on airport property, if needed.4    What the condition/capacity is of the tank farms, terminal equipment, and truck racks.    If modifications to fuel infrastructure due to capacity issues or other concerns are required,  consider how planned modifications could be most compatible with enabling accommodation  incremental SAF supply.  When undertaking growth planning, alternative fuels are a way to allow for added capacity without  requiring a new pipeline permit, which can be difficult to obtain. Lastly, airports can seek to educate all  stakeholders about the impacts, operational changes, and potential benefits of using alternative jet  fuels.  Aircraft Technology  In 2013, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) released a Technology Roadmap to identify  possible technological improvements to the airframe—aerodynamics, lightweight materials and  structures, equipment systems, etc.—and engines to support meeting the goal set by IATA, global  associations of aerospace manufacturers, airports and other partners of reducing aviation emissions  50% by 2050 (IATA 2013). Through modeling, researchers estimated existing technological  improvements could increase fuel efficiency by 30% for the aircraft generation after 2020, but that more  advanced technologies would be necessary to meet the 50% by 2050 goal. The Roadmap also discusses  emerging but not yet commercialized technologies, such as new wing designs to enable reduced weight,  formation flight, battery‐powered aircraft, and aircraft fuel from solar energy.                                                               4 Note: IATA strongly recommends that only certified and aircraft ready fuel gets delivered to the airport, and  industry recommendations are to avoid blending within the airport fenceline. 

  61    Through FAA’s Continuous Lower Energy, Emissions, and Noise  (CLEEN) program and NASA’s Environmentally Responsible  Aviation (ERA) program, the U.S. government has been  investing in research and development in collaboration with  airlines, to improve aviation design and at least initially, to  meet the Obama administration’s goal of achieving carbon  neutral growth in U.S. aviation by 2020. CLEEN had a target to  reduce fuel burn by 25% by 2015, and ERA to reduce fuel burn  50% by 2020.  The International Council on Clean Transportation released a  survey of zero‐emission technology options for aviation in  2018, highlighting that while aircraft manufacturers have  continued to electrify on‐board systems, such as de‐icing and  pressurization, the energy demands for propulsion far outweigh these improvements (Hall et al. 2018).  As a result, the forefront of the industry is considering options for zero and near‐zero‐emission  technologies, including battery‐electric, hybrid‐electric, and fuel cell power systems. Operational  missions where electric aircraft may become most viable in the near future are hybrids, short duration  flights for general aviation, short haul commercial passenger flights, and short haul cargo delivery.  Electric aircraft can offer carbon‐free air travel, zero criteria pollutant emissions, reduced noise, reduced  operating costs, less frequent aircraft maintenance, avoidance of safety and supply chain issues  associated with liquid fuels, and the potential for revenue generation from charging fees.   Manufacturers such as Airbus have been working to develop electric aircraft models that could serve  short haul flights, as well as a newer concept for intra‐urban air taxis, though until battery density  improves, fully electric aircraft are unlikely to be viable at a commercial scale. Nevertheless, Norway is  aiming to electrify all short‐haul flights by 2040. Avinor, which owns and operates most of Norway’s  airports, commissioned a feasibility study that concluded that battery‐powered electric aircraft could  serve more than 20 short routes in Norway today and by 2028‐2033 will be able to accommodate flights  of more than 500 kilometers, or 300 miles (Reimers 2018).   Due to the more intensive power needs for takeoff, hybrid‐electric concepts are in development that  would utilize an electric motor to supplement the piston engine for takeoff and landing. An emissions  modeling comparison found that small‐scale battery‐electric and hydrogen commuter planes would  have greater emissions than a kerosene‐powered plane under higher carbon intensity electric grid  mixes, but far lower under mostly renewable energy powered grid mixes like that in Norway, which the  modelers expect will improve as battery density improves. The authors also highlight the future barriers  of infrastructure costs for hydrogen or electrified aircraft (Hall et al. 2018).  Airport Policy Measures  Airports may be able to implement policies to incentivize airlines to adopt the cleaner technologies and  practices referenced in some cases. For example, Zurich Airport in 1997 implemented emissions‐based  landing fees which discounted fees for the cleanest aircraft by 5% and increased landing fees 40% for  the dirtiest, though there are regulatory barriers in the United States to enacting such an approach  (ACRP 2011b).   Electric Aircraft at SFO  In 2018, SFO announced that it is not  interested in pursuing electric aircraft  as they view them as a short haul  solution. California is investing in high‐ speed rail as a short haul solution so  SFO does not have the incentive to  pursue electric aircraft. Electric aircraft  would also add significant electricity  load for the airport, further  disincentivizing the effort.  

Next: Chapter 5: Funding Opportunities and Mechanisms »
Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Airports worldwide are setting aggressive zero- or low-emissions targets. To meet these targets, airports are deploying new strategies, adopting innovative financing mechanisms, and harnessing the collective influence of voluntary emissions and reporting programs. In tandem, new and affordable zero- or low-emissions technologies are rapidly becoming available at airports.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's pre-publicaton draft of ACRP Research Report 220: Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports covers all steps of roadmap development, from start to finish, using conceptual diagrams, examples, best practices, and links to external tools and resources. While the main focus of this Guidebook is airport‐controlled greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, it provides discussion about airport‐influenced emissions from airlines, concessionaires, and passengers.

Whereas other guidebooks and reference material provide airports with information on emissions mitigation and management (for example, the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airport Carbon Emissions Reduction, ACRP Report 11: Guidebook on Preparing Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories, and the Airport Council International’s Guidance Manual: Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management), this Guidebook articulates steps for creating an airport‐specific emissions roadmap.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!