National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports (2020)

Chapter: Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach

« Previous: Chapter 5: Funding Opportunities and Mechanisms
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 82
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 83
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 84
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 85
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 86
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25677.
×
Page 88

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

  75    Chapter 6: Monitoring and Outreach  Once the roadmap is completed and publicly released, the Core Decision‐Making Team discussed in  Chapter 2 needs to establish internal processes to ensure the roadmap can be maintained over time.  Additionally, the Core Decision‐Making Team should have been coordinating with the airport’s public  affairs office during the roadmap development to ensure an effective outreach program. These post‐ roadmap development items are the focus of Chapter 6 and are illustrated in Figure 23.   Chapter 6.1: Develop Monitoring and Reporting Program  Developing a Monitoring Program  Frequency of Assessment  The first step in developing an effective GHG emissions monitoring program is to choose a consistent  assessment frequency. GRI recommends annual reporting, as this allows for consistent and timely  assessments of progress towards meeting an established emissions goal and developing emissions  trends. Once a reporting frequency has been chosen, that same frequency should be used throughout  the goal period. Figure 24 depicts of a flowchart of an emissions monitoring program.  Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Calculating Emissions  When monitoring and reporting emissions for a reporting year, a GHG inventory should be conducted.  Reporting year emissions should be reported separately by gas (in metric tons) and by carbon dioxide  equivalent (CO2e) (in metric tons). Upon assessing reporting year emissions, the change in emissions  since the start of the goal period should be calculated. Knowing the change in emissions can help airport  staff understand target‐year emissions reduction goals’ attainability as well as showcasing how far the  airport has advanced, helping ensure that the airport remains on the right track for attaining its  established goals. The following formula provides the change in emissions for a reporting year:  Δ emissions since start of goal period = Reporting year emissions (t CO2e) – baseline emissions (t CO2e)  After calculating the change in emissions since the start of the goal period, the next step is calculating  additional emissions reductions that may be necessary to achieve the reporting year goal:   Reductions needed to achieve the goal (t CO2e) = Reporting year emissions (t CO2e) – allowable  emissions in target year (t CO2e)  Figure 22. Steps to Initiate Roadmap Planning.  Chapter 6.1: Develop  Monitoring and Reporting  Program    Chapter 6.2: Identify  Triggers for Re‐Evaluation    Chapter 6.3: Conduct  Outreach    3

  76    With the necessary data calculated for emissions in the  reporting year, the airport should assess why emissions  have changed since the start of the goal period. This  assessment should determine whether emissions  dropped as a result of new technologies and policies,  growth or decline in business, seasonal weather  variations, or some combination. Each reporting year, the  airport should take stock of every potential GHG  emissions driver, in addition to sources established in the  GHG inventory, and should collect data on how each  driver has changed over the goal period. With this  information, the airport can estimate the fraction of total  emissions changes that can be attributed to each driver  Drivers vs. Sources of Emissions  Emissions sources are physical  activities or objects that emit GHGs.  Examples include furnaces and  heaters, electricity consumption, or  aircraft. Emissions drivers are factors  that increase or decrease emissions  coming from those sources. Examples  include more efficient heaters, the  use of renewable electricity, or a  decline in annual flights.  Figure 24: Airport Emissions Monitoring Program Flowchart.  Calculate change in  emissions or estimate  change in future  emissions Calculate additional  emissions reductions  needed to achieve goal Assess reasons for  emissions change Assess whether airport is  on track to meet goal Determine additional  actions needed to achieve  goal Implement actions  needed to achieve goal

  77    (e.g., how much change results from more efficient shuttle buses vs. how much results from a change in  the number of shuttle bus miles traveled).   After each reporting year, clear trends should emerge that show whether or not the airport heads in the  right direction and remains on track to meet its target‐year reduction goal. Establishment of these  trends allow airports to pivot, change, or stop strategies, depending on how well they are working.  Effective Reporting   Having a concise and easy to understand mechanism for communicating progress on zero or low  emission planning is important for keeping internal and external stakeholders up to date and for holding  the airport accountable. Many airports publish an annual sustainability report, which includes any  efforts on reducing emissions. Of these airports, some establish their own methods for organizing and  structuring the reports. Recent trends in private sector reporting and disclosure have been adopted by  the aviation industry, bringing consistency to airport annual reporting.  Global Reporting Initiative  Airports are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the Airport Operators Sector Supplement  developed by GRI, as GRI collaborates with industry stakeholders to develop the most widely adopted  global standards for sustainability reporting. GRI’s reporting framework is intended to provide a method  for reporting on an organization’s economic, environmental, and social performance. GRI Standard 305  requires disclosures on Scope 1, 2, and 3 GHG emissions, GHG emissions intensity, and reduction of GHG  emissions, in addition to ozone‐depleting substances and other pollutants (GRI 2019). These seven  standard disclosures are summarized in Table 19.   Table 19. GRI 305 Emissions Disclosures  Standard Disclosure  Topic  305‐1  Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions  305‐2  Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions  305‐3  Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions  305‐4  GHG emissions intensity  305‐5  Reduction of GHG emissions  305‐6  Emissions of ozone‐depleting substances (ODS)  305‐7  Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX), and other significant air emissions  Disclosure of GHG emissions reductions means publicly reporting on GHG emissions reduced as a direct  result of reduction activities, as opposed to other drivers, the scopes in which reductions took place, and  the methodologies and assumptions used. GRI guidance indicates that offsets can be included as part of  reduction efforts, but these must be reported separately. Any additional details that airports provide  regarding progress toward emissions goals (such as specific offsets purchased) increase transparency  and provide stakeholders with a thorough record of airport emissions reduction activities. Airports such  as San Diego International Airport, Toronto Pearson International Airport, and Amsterdam Airport  Schiphol all prepare their annual reports in accordance with GRI Standards.  Integrated Reporting  “Integrated reporting” is a concept developed by a coalition of corporate reporting entities to advance  corporate reporting into areas focusing on value creation. According to the International Integrated 

  78    Reporting Council (IIRC), integrated reporting is “a process founded on integrated thinking that results in  a periodic integrated report by an organization about value creation over time and related  communications regarding aspects of value creation.” The integrated report resulting from this process  “is a concise communication about how an organization’s strategy, governance, performance and  prospects, in the context of its external environment, lead to the creation of value in the short, medium  and long term (IIRC).” Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and Munich International Airport are examples of  airports that both practice integrated reporting and follow GRI Standards. Zero or low emission planning  proves well‐suited for inclusion within an airport’s integrated report as it touches on several  opportunities the airport has to create value.   Producing a report is just one‐way airports can showcase  progress and success of their emissions reduction efforts.  Increasing public awareness of zero or low emissions  planning at the airport can enhance the airport’s  reputation, build goodwill, and potentially encourage  additional stakeholders to become involved. Tactics for  increasing awareness of zero or low emission planning  and related efforts include the following:   Integrating updates on zero or low emission  planning efforts across all communications  channels (such as newsletters, email, and social  media)   Participating in civic groups and business  organizations, including business chambers and  economic development/tourism offices   Highlighting emissions planning and reduction efforts through speaking engagements and  airport tours   Highlighting emissions planning and reduction efforts via prominently displayed airport signage  and posters in common areas   Hosting open houses and community meetings that highlight emissions reduction efforts  Chapter 6.2: Identify Triggers for Re‐Evaluation  A number of factors, internal and external, could result in an airport revising its GHG emissions  reduction targets. External factors include new advances in technology (making more ambitious  emissions reduction targets feasible over a shorter period of time). Regulation changes could require  airports to adopt certain practices or technologies. Unexpected challenges, such as natural or man‐ made disasters, or anything that fundamentally changes an airport’s business model, may alter the  cost‐benefit calculus for emissions reduction. Internal factors that could cause revisions include the  airport substantially missing a reporting year goal and no longer remaining on track to achieve  allowable emissions by the target year.  Continually accounting for advances in energy, building, and transportation technology, both on‐ and off‐ site, as well as risks from disruptions or changing business trends, can help airports take full advantage  of opportunities available to reduce emissions—and to revise targets, when appropriate.  Munich International Airport Pursues  “Integrated Thinking” Approach  Munich International Airport has been  publishing integrated annual reports  since 2011, providing updates on  economic, environmental, and social  aspects together. Guided by the  framework developed by the  International Integrated Reporting  Council, Munich Airport conveys its  activities that create short‐, medium,  and long‐term financial and non‐ financial value (Flughafen München  GmbH, 2019). 

  79    Technology and Policy Changes  Though technology changes are usually adopted voluntarily, it may be useful for airports to set specific  timelines on which to assess the state of emerging technologies and consider the readiness, benefits,  and costs of adopting them. A period from every three to five years may be appropriate, given the  innovation pace for building and energy efficiency products.  Policy changes can be anticipated or unanticipated. Changing political parties in local, state, and federal  government, along with shifting public attitudes, can affect the tools airports can use to meet emissions  reduction targets. Airports can anticipate policy changes by maintaining a dialogue with policy‐makers  regarding emissions reduction targets and emissions reduction strategies. Making a business case for  continual emissions reduction (see Chapter 1.3) can aid in this effort.   Disruptions and Business Cycles  Unexpected shocks, such as natural disasters or business cycle shifts, could force airports to slow their  expected emissions reduction targets (e.g., as they recover) or encourage them to accelerate investment  (e.g., to become more resilient to the next disruption or downturn). Each airport will find itself in a  different context. In the event of a disaster, an airport’s stakeholders may push for any renovation or  rebuilding to take place in a manner which enables more ambitious reduction targets. However, a  disaster that results in a large amount of damage may constrain resources to the extent that airports  must forgo investments in emissions reduction technologies and practices for some period of time, as to  focus resources on more immediate concerns.  In an economy on the upswing, airline ridership will continually increase, fueling revenue for airports to  invest more into emissions reduction strategies than initially anticipated. In a recession, declining  ridership and revenue may force airports to forgo expected emissions reduction strategies that require  significant new capital. At the same time, decreasing utility energy can help enhance airports’ bottom  lines in downturns.  Table 20 describes potential changes that could trigger the need for re‐evaluation of airport emissions  reduction targets, broken down by emissions scope.  Table 20. Examples of Potential Triggers for Airport Emissions Target Re‐Evaluation.    Scope 1  Scope 2  Scope 3  Te ch no lo gy   New classes of HVAC equipment  become available  New renewable energy generation  technology  Mass adoption of electric vehicles  (used by employees and passengers)  Addition of on‐site renewable energy  technology (e.g., solar panels)  New renewable energy storage  technology  New sustainable aviation fuel  technology becomes available  Alteration/expansion of airport  facilities (e.g., renovation of terminal  increases insulation)    New transportation options to airport  (e.g., new rapid transit system, fuel  efficient buses, new routes)  Po lic y  Regulation requires airports to adopt  specific on‐site technology or to limit  on‐site emissions  Regulation requires airports to  purchase specific amount of energy  produced by renewables  Policy incentivizes airport employee  commuting or passenger arrival via  new method (e.g., shared vehicles  replace single‐occupancy cars)  Regulation requires airports to adopt specific emissions target  Di sa st er   Natural or man‐made disaster forces airport to defer investment in emissions reduction strategies to focus on  immediate concerns 

  80      Scope 1  Scope 2  Scope 3  Bu sin es s C yc le   Revenue reductions force deferment  of capital‐intensive, on‐site,  renewable energy generation  technology or electrification (e.g.,  solar panels)  Price of fossil fuels dramatically falls,  reducing benefit‐cost of purchasing  green energy  Budget cuts reduce public funding for  sustainable transportation to airport    Price of renewable energy  dramatically falls, incentivizing  greater purchase of green energy  Price of gasoline falls, encouraging  employees and passengers to arrive  to airport by single‐occupancy vehicle  In te rn al   Internal emissions reduction target is missed within a given year  Internal emissions reduction target is exceeded within a given year  Chapter 6.3: Conduct Outreach  Conducting outreach entails engaging with external stakeholders, such as community members,  vendors, and tenants. People living near to a site and businesses that operate within and surrounding  airports stand to benefit most from changes such as improved air quality, so outreach to these affected  stakeholders remains crucial. Chapter 2 provides guidance on identifying an airport’s  external stakeholders.  Conducting outreach for emissions reporting and progress towards an emissions reduction goal provide  results similar to initial outreach, performed for establishing goals and a roadmap. Rather than  collaborating with stakeholders to create the goals and a roadmap to reach them, the airport has a  chance to inform stakeholders on the progress they have made, the challenges they have encountered,  and the areas that still have room for improvements. This external communication should include input  from the airport’s marketing and communications teams.  An airport’s emissions reduction progress outreach toolbox provides multiple tools:   Emissions Reduction Program Fact Sheet   Customer Emissions Reduction Program Survey   Stakeholder Meetings   Emissions Reduction Progress Report Open Houses   Social Media   Internal Marketing (e.g., airport advertising space and announcements)  If an airport has the resources to support a dedicated marketing or communications team, outreach  should fall within their skillset. Smaller airports may have to rely on other team members for outreach  duties. For resources on conducting surveys, hosting meetings, and other communication tools, see  Chapter 2.  Diverse engagement avenues are key to successful outreach. Whether social media, an open house, or a  survey, some key questions should be asked of participants to inform future communications on  emissions reduction progress—and potentially the emissions reduction strategies themselves:    Have you heard about the airport’s GHG reduction program?   Why is it important to you that the airport reaches its GHG reduction goals?   What do you think the airport is doing well in meeting its GHG reduction goals?   What do you think the airport could do better in meeting its GHG reduction goals? 

  81     How could progress be better conveyed?  Questions should be tailored for before and after the release of public progress to gauge public interest  and to receive comprehensive feedback. Community members can often offer a unique perspective, and  they may think of something overlooked by the airport team. Ensuring a cyclical process of receiving  feedback, incorporating feedback, and asking for more feedback in each reporting year will lead to a  stronger emissions reduction plan. This also poses an ideal opportunity to showcase how customers’  and tenants’ dollars are spent to further sustainability efforts.     

Next: References »
Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Airports worldwide are setting aggressive zero- or low-emissions targets. To meet these targets, airports are deploying new strategies, adopting innovative financing mechanisms, and harnessing the collective influence of voluntary emissions and reporting programs. In tandem, new and affordable zero- or low-emissions technologies are rapidly becoming available at airports.

The TRB Airport Cooperative Research Program's pre-publicaton draft of ACRP Research Report 220: Guidebook for Developing a Zero- or Low-Emissions Roadmap at Airports covers all steps of roadmap development, from start to finish, using conceptual diagrams, examples, best practices, and links to external tools and resources. While the main focus of this Guidebook is airport‐controlled greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, it provides discussion about airport‐influenced emissions from airlines, concessionaires, and passengers.

Whereas other guidebooks and reference material provide airports with information on emissions mitigation and management (for example, the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airport Carbon Emissions Reduction, ACRP Report 11: Guidebook on Preparing Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories, and the Airport Council International’s Guidance Manual: Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management), this Guidebook articulates steps for creating an airport‐specific emissions roadmap.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!