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Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebooks for Post-Award Contract Administration for Highway Projects Delivered Using Alternative Contracting Methods, Volume 1: Design–Build Delivery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25686.
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Page 41
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebooks for Post-Award Contract Administration for Highway Projects Delivered Using Alternative Contracting Methods, Volume 1: Design–Build Delivery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25686.
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Page 42
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guidebooks for Post-Award Contract Administration for Highway Projects Delivered Using Alternative Contracting Methods, Volume 1: Design–Build Delivery. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25686.
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Page 43

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    35    7.3 Closeout Phase Contract Administration Tools In this phase the agency seeks to ensure the completion of construction and facilitate the transfer of ownership of the facility to the agency’s asset management and maintenance staff. These actions include conducting final inspections, receiving turnover documentation and reviewing corrective actions. Project teams should address these activities leading up to closeout so that the appropriate project documentation can be made available in the closeout phase. Construction challenges and the push to closeout a project can strain relationships. The tool 9 Continuity of team members can help support closeout activities since the same key people working on the project during early alignment, design and construction also remain through closeout. Continuing involvement from key team members supports decisions and agreements made earlier in the project. Moreover, 8 D-B Specific partnering during the project, from procurement until closeout, can provide a team with a framework for working collaboratively and efficiently. Federally funded projects will have FHWA requirements at the closeout phase, and a 10 FHWA involvement overview can help the team keep track of these requirements. Likewise, some permit commitments with regulatory agencies may be part of closeout and a 11 Permit Commitment database can serve as a tool to facilitate compliance. The tool 21 Delegation of authority facilitates timely decision-making when questions arise related to payment, punchlist items, claims, warranties and other documentation. The tool 28 Payment checklist clarifies the steps for invoicing and final payment as well as responsibilities for each activity. By closeout, the public has lived through a period of construction, and a 20 Public announcements can help communicate the benefits such as access, time, cost, and safety that were achieved by the project. Closeout is a continuation and culmination of the construction phase, with the added requirements of finalizing documentation and payments. Some of the tools used in earlier phases can and should continue to be used during closeout. In fact, this research found no new closeout-specific tools that were not already included in the previous construction administration phases. Table 7.1 lists closeout tools to help the project team fulfill project goals, permit requirements, and contract requirements. It also includes recommendations for tool use with different levels of project size and complexity. The tool descriptions in Appendix A elaborate on the tools and their applicability by project complexity and size. Successful project closeout is the culmination of effective construction administration and documentation throughout the project.

    36    Table 7.1 Summary of D-B closeout phase tools Contract administration phase Project complexity Project size Tools for D-B contract administration A lig nm en t D es ig n Co ns tru ct io n C lo se ou t N on -c om pl ex M od er at el y co m pl ex C om pl ex ≤ $1 0 M $1 0 M - $5 0 M > $5 0M Phase 4: Administer Closeout of D-B Project 8 D-B specific partnering           9 Continuity of team members           10 FHWA involvement overview           11 Permit commitment database           20 Public announcement          21 Delegation of authority          28 Payment checklist          = Recommended;  = Consider Case-by-Case;  = Not Recommended 7.4 Summary The closeout phase of a project is a joint effort between the agency and the design-builder. This chapter highlights tools agencies can use to administer D-B project closeout. The primary goal of these tools is to help project participants communicate, document, plan, and execute closeout efficiently. The descriptions in Appendix A elaborates on the tools and their applicability by project complexity and size.

    37    Chapter 8. Guidebook Implementation 8.1 Introduction Implementation of D-B contract administration occurs in the context of the larger organization. This chapter provides guidance on identifying:  Strategies for meeting implementation goals at the organizational level.  Tools for meeting implementation goals at the project level.  Personnel and resources for implementation at both organizational and project levels.  Aspects of organizational culture important to D-B contract administration. Table 8.1 summarizes implementation goals at the organization and project levels. Strategies discussed here are those presented in Chapter 2, and tools discussed here are those presented in Chapters 3 to 7 of this Guidebook. Table 8.1 Implementation goals Agency Level Implementation Focus Implementation Goals Organization Strategies 1. Commit to long-term implementation 2. Assign roles and responsibilities 3. Assess and adjust current strategy 4. Communicate agency direction for D-B contract administration 5. Train organizational team members 6. Develop a method to measure and evaluate performance Project Tools 1. Assess existing tools 2. Identify appropriate tools based on project characteristics 3. Train project team members 4. Test new tools 5. Evaluate the performance of tools 8.2 Organizational Level Goals The organizational level goals focus on introducing and embedding new D-B contract administration tasks and processes into the organization. Organizational Goal 1: Commit to Long-Term Implementation When an agency adopts an alternative contracting method like D-B, new goals and new strategies are required to achieve those goals. A long-term commitment by the agency to embrace D-B

Next: Appendix A - Contract Administration Tools »
Guidebooks for Post-Award Contract Administration for Highway Projects Delivered Using Alternative Contracting Methods, Volume 1: Design–Build Delivery Get This Book
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The transportation industry has a need for contract administration guidance.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Research Report 939: Guidebooks for Post-Award Contract Administration for Highway Projects Delivered Using Alternative Contracting Methods, Volume 1: Design–Build Delivery provides a practitioner’s guide for construction administration on Design–Build (D-B) projects. Whether an agency is using the D-B contracting method for the first time or has significant experience with the method, this Guidebook provides useful strategies and tools to support D-B project administration. Highway agency personnel are the audience for the Guidebook.

Volume 2, on construction manager–general contractor delivery, and Vol. 3, a research overview, are also available.

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