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Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance (2020)

Chapter: Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Appendix A

Excluded Guideline Documents

Based on eligibility criteria set forth by the committee, the guideline documents listed in this appendix were excluded through screening. The documents are categorized by the rationale for exclusion.

Peanut allergy–related recommendations predating the release of the LEAP trial results (n = 1)

Chan, E. S., C. Cummings, Canadian Paediatric Society, and Community Paediatrics Committee and Allergy Section. 2013. Dietary exposures and allergy prevention in high-risk infants: A joint statement with the Canadian society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Paediatrics and Child Health 18(10):545–554.

Documents that provide guidance related to clinical management of lactation (n = 2)

Holmes, A. V., A. Y. McLeod, and M. Bunik. 2013. ABM clinical protocol #5: Peripartum breastfeeding management for the healthy mother and infant at term, revision 2013. Breastfeeding Medicine 8(6):469–473.

Kellams, A., C. Harrel, S. Omage, C. Gregory, and C. Rosen-Carole. 2017. ABM clinical protocol #3: Supplementary feedings in the healthy term breastfed neonate, revised 2017. Breastfeeding Medicine 12:188–198.

Position statements that only recommend methods for preparing and storing foods, including breast milk or formula (n = 5)

AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics), Committee on Infectious Diseases, and Committee on Nutrition. 2014. Consumption of raw or unpasteurized milk and milk products by pregnant women and children. Pediatrics 133(1):175–179.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

Eglash, A., L. Simon, and Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. 2017. ABM clinical protocol #8: Human milk storage information for home use for full-term infants, revised 2017. Breastfeeding Medicine 12(7):390–395.

FSAI (Food Safety Authority of Ireland). 2015. FSAI scientific committee recommendations of sodium content of bottled water suitable for infant feeding. Corrigendum: Section 4.8.3 scientific recommendations for a national infant feeding policy, 2nd edition. Dublin, Ireland: FSAI.

Ministry of Health and New Zealand Government. 2017. Feeding your baby infant formula: How to prepare infant formula safely. https://www.healthed.govt.nz/system/files/resource-files/HE1306_Feeding%20your%20baby%20infant%20formula_0.pdf (accessed February 20, 2020).

WHO/FAO (World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations). 2007. Safe preparation, storage and handling of powdered infant formula. Guidelines. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

Clinical treatment guideline for a specific disease or condition (n = 3)

Leung, A. K. C., V. Marchand, R. S. Sauve, Canadian Paediatric Society, and Nutrition and Gastroenterology Committee. 2012. The “picky eater”: The toddler or preschooler who does not eat. Paediatrics and Child Health 17(8):455–460.

Reece-Stremtan, S., and K. A. Marinelli. 2015. ABM clinical protocol #21: Guidelines for breastfeeding and substance use or substance use disorder, revised 2015. Breastfeeding Medicine 10(3):135–141.

Thomas, D. W., and F. R. Greer. 2010. Probiotics and prebiotics in pediatrics. Pediatrics 126(6):1217–1231.

Documents that have the primary purpose of being a communication or dissemination tool (e.g., training manual, pamphlets) (n = 37)

AAP, APHA (American Public Health Association), and NRCHS (National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education). 2019. Nutrition and food service. In Caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards; guidelines for early care and education programs. Itasca, IL: AAP.

Ascend at the Aspen Institute. 2019. Healthy food and nutrition. https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2019/04/healthy-food-and-nutrition.html (accessed June 16, 2020).

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). 2013. The CDC guide to strategies to support breastfeeding mothers and babies. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

CDC. 2018. How to keep your breast pump kit clean: Science behind the recommendations. https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/hygiene/healthychildcare/infantfeeding/science-behind-recommendations.html (accessed February 20, 2020).

Danish Health Authority. 2017. Healthy children in a new country: 0–2 years. https://www.sst.dk/-/media/Udgivelser/2017/Sunde-b%C3%B8rn-i-et-nyt-land/Sunde-b%C3%B8rn-engelsk-udgave (accessed June 11, 2020).

FSAI. 2011. Scientific recommendations for a national infant feeding policy, 2nd edition. Dublin, Ireland: FSAI.

FSAI. 2012. Best practice for infant feeding in Ireland. From pre-conception through the first year of an infant’s life. Dublin, Ireland: FSAI.

HHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 2015. Caring for our children basics. Health and safety foundations for early care and education. Washington, DC: HHS.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

HHS. 2016. Head Start performance standards. Federal Register 81(172):61294–61453.

Institute for Preventive Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Prolepsis. 2014. National nutrition guide for infants, children and adolescents. http://www.diatrofikoiodigoi.gr/?Page=diatrofikoi-odigoi-paidia (accessed May 5, 2020).

Ministry of Health and New Zealand Government. 2013. Eating for healthy babies and toddlers (accessed February 20, 2020).

Ministry of Health Education and Agriculture and FAO. 2013. Food-based dietary guidelines for Antigua and Barbuda. http://www.fao.org/nutrition/education/food-dietary-guidelines/regions/countries/antigua-and-barbuda/en (accessed May 5, 2020).

Ministry of Health, The Bahamas. 2002. Food-based dietary guidelines—Bahamas. http://www.fao.org/nutrition/education/food-dietary-guidelines/regions/countries/bahamas/en (accessed May 5, 2020).

Muth, N. D., W. H. Dietz, S. N. Magge, and R. K. Johnson. 2019. Public policies to reduce sugary drink consumption in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 143(4):e20190282.

National Dietary Guidelines Task Force. 2015. Qatar dietary guidelines. http://www.fao.org/3/a-az908e.pdf (accessed May 5, 2020).

NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). 2015b. Postnatal care up to 8 weeks after birth. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg37 (accessed February 20, 2020).

NICE. 2017. Vitamin D: Supplement use in specific population groups. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph56 (accessed February 20, 2020).

Norwegian Directorate of Health. 2017. Food and meals for infants. https://www.helsedirektoratet.no/brosjyrer/mat-og-maltider-for-spedbarn (accessed June 11, 2020).

OWH (Office on Women’s Health). 2018. Your guide to breastfeeding. https://www.womenshealth.gov/files/documents/your-guide-to-breastfeeding.pdf (accessed February 20, 2020).

Pound, C. M., S. L. Unger, Canadian Paediatric Society, Hospital Paediatrics Section, Nutrition and Gastroenterology Committee. 2012. The baby-friendly initiative: Protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding. Paediatrics and Child Health 17(6):317–327.

Swedish National Food Agency. 2012a. Good food for children between one and two years. https://www.livsmedelsverket.se/globalassets/publikationsdatabas/andra-sprak/bramat-for-barn/good-food-for-children-1-2-years.pdf (accessed June 11, 2020).

Swedish National Food Agency. 2012b. Good food for infants under one year. https://www.livsmedelsverket.se/globalassets/publikationsdatabas/andra-sprak/bra-mat-for-spadbarn/good-food-for-infants-under-one-year-livsmedelsverket.pdf (accessed June 11, 2020).

Swedish National Food Agency. 2015. Find your way to eat greener, not too much and be active! http://www.fao.org/3/a-az854e.pdf (accessed May 5, 2020).

USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture). 2012. Family day care homes monitor handbook. A child and adult care food program handbook. https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/Monitoring_Homes.pdf (accessed June 11, 2020).

USDA. 2014. Independent child care centers. A Child and Adult Care Food Program handbook. https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/cacfp/Independent%20Child%20Care%20Centers%20Handbook.pdf (accessed June 11, 2020).

USDA. 2018. Breastfed babies welcome here! A mother’s guide. https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/tn/BBWH.pdf (accessed June 16, 2020).

USDA. 2019a. Feeding infants in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. https://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/feeding-infants-child-and-adult-care-food-program (accessed June 16, 2020).

USDA. 2019b. Infant nutrition and feeding. Infant nutrition and feeding guide. https://wic-works.fns.usda.gov/resources/infant-nutrition-and-feeding-guide (accessed June 16, 2020).

USDA. n.d.a. Updated Child and Adult Care Food Program meal patterns: Child and adult meals https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/cacfp/CACFP_MealBP.pdf (accessed February 20, 2020).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

USDA. n.d.b. Updated Child and Adult Care Food Program meal patterns: Infant meals. https://fns-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/cacfp/CACFP_InfantMealPattern_FactSheet_V2.pdf (accessed February 20, 2020).

WHO (World Health Organization). 2002. Infant and young child nutrition. Global strategy on infant and young child feeding. Report by the secretariat. http://apps.who.int/gb/archive/pdf_files/WHA55/ea5515.pdf?ua=1 (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2003a. Community-based strategies for breastfeeding promotion and support in developing countries. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO. 2009. Infant and young child feeding: Model chapter. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/infantfeeding/9789241597494/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2017a. Protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and newborn services—guideline. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/guidelines/breastfeeding-facilities-maternity-newborn/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2018. Guideline: Counselling of women to improve breastfeeding practices. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/guidelines/counselling-women-improve-bf-practices/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO and UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund). 2003. Global strategy for infant and young child feeding. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO and UNICEF. 2007. Planning guide for national implementation of the global strategy for infant and young child feeding. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/infantfeeding/9789241595193/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

Guidelines related to malnutrition or emergency situations (n = 1)

WHO. 2003b. Complementary feeding: Report of the global consultation, and summary of guiding principles for complementary feeding of the breastfed child. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/infantfeeding/924154614X/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

Dietary Reference Intake or other dietary reference values for individual nutrients (n = 3)

EFSA NDA Panel (European Food Safety Authority Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies). 2013. Scientific opinion on nutrient requirements and dietary intakes of infants and young children in the European Union. EFSA Journal 11(10):3408.

Koletzko, B., E. Lien, C. Agostoni, H. Bohles, C. Campoy, I. Cetin, T. Decsi, J. W. Dudenhausen, C. Dupont, S. Forsyth, I. Hoesli, W. Holzgreve, A. Lapillonne, G. Putet, N. J. Secher, M. Symonds, H. Szajewska, P. Willatts, and R. Uauy. 2008. The roles of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnancy, lactation and infancy: Review of current knowledge and consensus recommendations. Journal of Perinatal Medicine 36(1):5–14.

SACN (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition). 2016. Vitamin D and health. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-vitamin-d-and-health-report (accessed June 16, 2020).

Guidelines about infant formula composition (n = 4)

EFSA NDA Panel. 2012. Scientific opinion on the suitability of goat milk protein as a source of protein in infant formulae and in follow-on formulae. EFSA Journal 10(3):2603.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

EFSA NDA Panel. 2014. Scientific opinion on the essential composition of infant and follow-on formulae. EFSA Journal 12(7):3760.

EFSA NDA Panel. 2017. Scientific opinion on the safety and suitability for use by infants of follow-on formulae with a protein content of at least 1.6 g/100 kcal. EFSA Journal 15(5):4781.

ESPGHAN (European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition) Committee on Nutrition, C. Braegger, A. Chmielewska, T. Decsi, S. Kolacek, W. Mihatsch, L. Moreno, M. Piescik, J. Puntis, R. Shamir, H. Szajewska, D. Turck, and J. van Goudoever. 2011. Supplementation of infant formula with probiotics and/or prebiotics: A systematic review and comment by the ESPGHAN committee on nutrition. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 52(2):238–250.

Documents not available in English (n = 1)

Davanzo, R., C. Romagnoli, and G. Corsello. 2015. Position statement on breastfeeding from the Italian Pediatric Societies. Italian Journal of Pediatrics 4:80.

Not the most current recommendations or guidelines from authoritative agencies and organizations (n = 3)

SACN (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition). 2011. Timing of introduction of gluten into the infant diet. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-statement-on-the-introduction-of-gluten-to-the-infant-diet (accessed June 16, 2020).

Wagner, C. L., F. R. Greer, and Section on Breastfeeding and Committee on Nutrition. 2008. Prevention of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics 122(5):1142–1152.

WHO. 2001. Global strategy for infant and young child feeding. The optimal duration of exclusive breastfeeding. http://apps.who.int/gb/archive/pdf_files/WHA54/ea54id4.pdf?ua=1&ua=1https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/42590/9241562218.pdf?sequence=1 (accessed June 16, 2020).

Guideline documents from, for, funded by, or in collaboration with industry (n = 1)

Butte, N., K. Cobb, J. Dwyer, L. Graney, W. Heird, K. Rickard, American Dietetic Association, and Gerber Products Company. 2004. The start healthy feeding guidelines for infants and toddlers. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 104(3):442–454.

Organization-level exclusion (n = 14)

Arundel, P., and N. Shaw. 2018. Vitamin D and bone health: A practical clinical guidelin for patient management in children and young people. National Osteoporosis Society Camerton, Somerset, England: National Osteoporosis Society.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

Fleischer, D. M., S. Sicherer, M. Greenhawt, D. Campbell, E. Chan, A. Muraro, S. Halken, Y. Katz, M. Ebisawa, L. Eichenfield, H. Sampson, G. Lack, G. Du Toit, G. Roberts, H. Bahnson, M. Feeney, J. Hourihane, J. Spergel, M. Young, A. As’aad, K. Allen, S. Prescott, S. Kapur, H. Saito, I. Agache, C. A. Akdis, H. Arshad, K. Beyer, A. Dubois, P. Eigenmann, M. Fernandez-Rivas, K. Grimshaw, K. Hoffman-Sommergruber, A. Host, S. Lau, L. O’Mahony, C. Mills, N. Papadopoulos, C. Venter, N. Agmon-Levin, A. Kessel, R. Antaya, B. Drolet, and L. Rosenwasser. 2015. Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 115(2):87–90.

La Leche League International. 2020. Starting solids. https://www.llli.org/breastfeeding-info/starting-solids (accessed February 20, 2020).

La Leche League USA. 2020a. Pumping milk. https://lllusa.org/pumping-milk (accessed February 20, 2020).

La Leche League USA. 2020b. Starting solids. https://lllusa.org/starting-solids (accessed February 20, 2020).

La Leche League USA. 2020c. Storing human milk. https://lllusa.org/storing-human-milk (accessed February 20, 2020).

Muraro, A., and G. Roberts. 2014. EAACI guidelines. Food allergy and anaphylaxis. Zurich, Switzerland: EAACI.

Perinatal Services BC. 2015. Health promotion guideline. Breastfeeding healthy term infants. http://www.perinatalservicesbc.ca/Documents/Guidelines-Standards/HealthPromotion/BreastfeedingHealthyTermInfantGuideline.pdf (accessed June 16, 2020).

Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario. 2018. Breastfeeding—promoting and supporting the initiation, exclusivity, and continuation of breastfeeding for newborns, infants, and young children, 3rd ed. Toronto, Canada: Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario.

UNICEF. 2016. From the first hour of life. New York: UNICEF.

UNICEF. 2018a. Breastfeeding. A mother’s gift, for every child. New York: UNICEF.

UNICEF. 2019. The state of the world’s children 2019. Children, food and nutrition: Growing well in a changing world. New York: UNICEF.

Welsh Government. 2019. Food and nutrition for childcare settings. Best practice guidance. https://gov.wales/food-and-nutrition-childcare-settings-full-guidance (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO and UNICEF. 2018. Capture the moment—early initiation of breastfeeding: The best start for every newborn. New York: UNICEF.

Recommendation topic does not meet inclusion criteria (n = 1)

Trasande, L., R. M. Shaffer, S. Sathyanarayana, and Council on Environmental Health. 2018. Food additives and child health. Pediatrics 142(2).

Summary documents/no specific feeding guidelines/position statements that only support or describe the benefits of breastfeeding without providing additional recommendations about how to feed (n = 22)

AAPD (American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry). 2016. Policy on oral health in child care centers. Oral Health Policies 40(6):38–40.

ABM (Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine). 2008. ABM clinical protocol #6: Guideline on co-sleeping and breastfeeding. Revision, March 2008. Breastfeeding Medicine 3(1):38–43.

AWHONN (Association of Women’s Health Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses). 2015. Breastfeeding. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing 44(1):145–150.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

Baby-Friendly USA. 2016. Guidelines and evaluation criteria for facilities seeking baby-friendly designation. Albany, NY: Baby-Friendly USA.

Busch, D. W., J. Silbert-Flagg, M. Ryngaert, and A. Scott. 2019. NAPNAP position statement on breastfeeding: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, Breastfeeding Education Special Interest Group. Journal of Pediatric Health Care 33(1):A11–A15.

Chantry, C. J., A. Eglash, and M. Labbok. 2015. ABM position on breastfeeding—revised 2015. Breastfeeding Medicine 10(9):407–411.

Cleveland, L. M. 2016. Breastfeeding recommendations for women who receive medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders: AWHONN practice brief number 4. Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Neonatal Nursing 45(4):574–576.

EFSA. 2017. Guidance on the risk assessment of substances present in food intended for infants below 16 weeks of age. EFSA Journal 15(5):4849.

EFSA. 2018. Scientific opinion on pesticides in foods for infants and young children. EFSA Journal 16(6):5286.

EFSA NDA Panel, D. Turck, J.-L. Bresson, B. Burlingame, T. Dean, S. Fairweather-Tait, M. Heinonen, K. I. Hirsch-Ernst, I. Mangelsdorf, H. J. McArdle, A. Naska, M. Neuhäuser-Berthold, G. Nowicka, K. Pentieva, Y. Sanz, A. Siani, A. Sjödin, M. Stern, D. Tomé, M. Vinceti, P. Willatts, K.-H. Engel, R. Marchelli, A. Pöting, M. Poulsen, J. R. Schlatter, R. Ackerl, and H. van Loveren. 2017. Statement on the safety of synthetic l-ergothioneine as a novel food—supplementary dietary exposure and safety assessment for infants and young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women. EFSA Journal 15(11):e05060.

ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition, C. Agostoni, C. Braegger, T. Decsi, S. Kolacek, B. Koletzko, K. F. Michaelsen, W. Mihatsch, L. A. Moreno, J. Puntis, R. Shamir, H. Szajewska, D. Turck, and J. van Goudoever. 2009. Breast-feeding: A commentary by the ESPGHAN committee on nutrition. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 49(1):112–125.

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2018. Use of donor human milk. https://www.fda.gov/science-research/pediatrics/use-donor-human-milk (accessed February 20, 2020).

Lessen, R., and K. Kavanagh. 2015. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Promoting and supporting breastfeeding. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 115(3):444–449.

Marra, M. V., and R. L. Bailey. 2018. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Micronutrient supplementation. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 118(11):2162–2173.

NICE. 2015a. Maternal and child nutrition. Quality standard. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs98/resources/maternal-and-child-nutrition-pdf-2098975759045 (accessed February 20, 2020).

Patterson, S., and in collaboration with ASPHN’s Maternal and Child Health Nutrition Council. 2018. Guidelines and health conditions related to timing of early infant feeding: A review. https://asphn.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Guidelines-and-Health-Conditions-Related-to-Timing-of-Early-Infant-Feeding.pdf (accessed June 16, 2020).

RCPCH (Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health). Vitamin D for infants, children an young people—guidance. https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/vitamin-d-infants-children-young-people-guidance (accessed February 20, 2020).

Schwarzenberg, S. J., and M. K. Georgieff. 2018. Advocacy for improving nutrition in the first 1000 days to support childhood development and adult health. Pediatrics 141(2):e20173716.

Sriraman, N. K., A. E. Evans, R. Lawrence, L. Noble, and Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine’s Board of Directors. 2018. Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine’s 2017 position statement on informal breast milk sharing for the term healthy infant. Breastfeeding Medicine 13(1):2–4.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

WHO. 2017b. WHO recommendations on child health: Guidelines approved by the WHO guidelines review committee. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO. 2017c. WHO recommendations on newborn health: Guidelines approved by the WHO guidelines review committee. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO. 2019. Commercial foods for infants and young children in the WHO European region. Policy brief on two new reports. http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/407563/Commercial-Foods-Policy-Brief-LowRes.pdf?ua=1 (accessed June 16, 2020).

Not the source document (n = 1)

PAHO (Pan American Health Organization). 2018. Best practices for feeding your child from 0 to 5 years of age. http://iris.paho.org/xmlui/handle/123456789/49132 (accessed June 16, 2020).

Not readily available on the Internet (n = 2)

Heird, W. C. 2012. Infant nutrition. In Present knowledge in nutrition, 10th edition, edited by J. W. Erdman, I. MacDonald, and S. H. Zeisel. Washington, DC: International Life Sciences Institute. Pp. 624–636.

Spangler, A., J. Flory, K. Wambach, C. Gray, T. Lemanski, M. McAllister, International Lactation Consultant Association, M. Rodina, M. Strieff, and K. Young. 2014. Clinical guidelines for the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Raleigh, NC: International Lactation Consultant Association.

Not applicable to healthy mother–infant dyad and/or high-income country (n = 12)

ABM. 2011. ABM clinical protocol #24: Allergic proctocolitis in the exclusively breastfed infant. Breastfeeding Medicine 6(6):435–440.

FIGO Committee for Safe Motherhood and Newborn Health. 2011. IPA, ICM, and FIGO joint statement on breastfeeding, including breastfeeding by HIV-infected mothers. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics 114(2):89–90.

Michaelsen, K. F., L. T. Weaver, F. Branca, and A. Robertson. 2000. Feeding and nutrition of infants and young children. Guidelines for the WHO European region, with emphasis on the former Soviet countries. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

PAHO. 2001. Providing vitamin A supplements through immunization and other health contacts for children 6–59 months and women up to 6 weeks postpartum: A guide for health workers. http://iris.paho.org/xmlui/handle/123456789/46030 (accessed June 25, 2020).

WHO. 2011a. Neonatal vitamin A supplementation—guideline. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/guidelines/vas_neonatal/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2011b. Vitamin A supplementation for infants 1–5 months of age. Guideline. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO. 2011c. Vitamin A supplementation for infants and children 6-59 months of age. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/guidelines/vas_6to59_months/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2013. WHO recommendations on postnatal care of the mother and newborn. Geneva Switzerland: WHO.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

WHO. 2015. Pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care. A guide for essential practice, 3rd edition. https://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/imca-essential-practice-guide/en (accessed May 18, 2020).

WHO. 2016a. Daily iron supplementation in infants and children—guideline. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/micronutrients/guidelines/daily_iron_supp_childrens/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

WHO. 2016b. Updates on HIV and infant feeding—guideline. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

WHO and UNICEF. 2009. Acceptable medical reasons for use of breast-milk substitutes. https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/infantfeeding/WHO_NMH_NHD_09.01/en (accessed June 16, 2020).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Page 202
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Excluded Guideline Documents." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months: Summarizing Existing Guidance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25747.
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Page 206
Next: Appendix B: Abstracted Recommendati »
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Recommendations for feeding infants and young children have changed substantially over time owing to scientific advances, cultural influences, societal trends, and other factors. At the same time, stronger approaches to reviewing and synthesizing scientific evidence have evolved, such that there are now established protocols for developing evidence-based health recommendations. However, not all authoritative bodies have used such approaches for developing infant feeding guidance, and for many feeding questions there is little or no sound evidence available to guide best practices, despite the fact that research on infant and young child feeding has expanded in recent decades. Summarizing the current landscape of feeding recommendations for infants and young children can reveal the level of consistency of existing guidance, shed light on the types of evidence that underpin each recommendation, and provide insight into the feasibility of harmonizing guidelines.

Feeding Infants and Children from Birth to 24 Months collects, compares, and summarizes existing recommendations on what and how to feed infants and young children from birth to 24 months of age. This report makes recommendations to stakeholders on strategies for communicating and disseminating feeding recommendations.

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