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Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances (2020)

Chapter: Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance

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Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
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Page 116
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 117
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 118
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 119
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 120
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 121
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 122
Page 123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 123
Page 124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix I - Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25750.
×
Page 124

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116 A P P E N D I X I Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance ORDINANCE NO. 2004 A21 AN ORDINANCE TO REVISE AND AMEND ORDINANCE 90-14, THE CITRUS COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, RELATING TO ACCESS MANAGEMENT PERTAINING TO STATE HIGHWAYS; PROVIDING FOR ACCESS SPACING RELATIVE TO DRIVEWAY, MEDIANS, MEDIAN OPENINGS, AND OTHER MATTERS; PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF THE US-19 ACCESS MANAGEMENT PLAN STANDARDS; PROVIDING FOR LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS AND THE INCORPORATION OF EXHIBITS; PROVIDING FOR LIBERAL CONSTRUCTION; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICTS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION AND PROVIDING FOR EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, sound planning and land use practices mandate that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County provide for reasonable access management standards pertaining to the highways and roads located within the jurisdictional limits of the County; and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County desires to coordinate its actions with those of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for the benefit of the citizens of Citrus County and the traveling public; and WHEREAS, the provisions of Florida law provide for the authority to regulate access to State roads within the jurisdictional limits of Citrus County; and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County has determined that the provisions of this Ordinance protect the public health, safety and welfare and are in the best interests of the citizens of Citrus County and the general traveling public; and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County has adopted Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the US-19 Access Management Plan via Ordinance 2003-A19 on September 23, 2003; and WHEREAS, the provisions of this Ordinance are consistent with the provisions of State law to include, but not be limited to, Chapters 125, 163, 187, and 335, Florida Statutes, Chapter 14-97, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), and other applicable law; and WHEREAS, the provisions of this Ordinance are consistent with the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan; and

Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance 117 SECTION 1. LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS/EXHIBITS/CONSTRUCTION. (a) The recitals set forth above in the whereas clauses to this Ordinance are hereby adopted as legislative findings relating to the enactment of this Ordinance. (b) The exhibits attached to this Ordinance (Numbers “14” through “20”) depict the US-19 corridor, Phase 3, defined as that section of the US-19 corridor from Ashburn Lane north to the Levy County line, the locations for planned median openings, auxiliary turn lanes and planned frontage/reverse frontage roads along the US-19 corridor and are hereby incorporated herein by this reference and made a material part of this Ordinance. (c) The exhibits Numbered “14” through “20” shall be amended to the previously adopted exhibits Numbers “1” through “13”, representing Phases 1 and 2 of the US-19 Access Management Plan. (d) The provisions of this Ordinance shall be liberally construed to accomplish the objectives set forth herein for the benefit of the citizens of Citrus County and the traveling public. MANAGEMENT, of the Citrus County Land Development Code (LDC), is hereby amended to read as follows: A. Standards for minimum spacing of access points for all arterial highways shall be by posted speed, in accordance with Chapter 14-97, F.A.C., FDOT Access Management Standards. The access spacing shall be as follows: FDOT ACCESS MANAGEMENT CLASSIFICATIONS STATE HIGHWAY FROM TO CLASS US-41 Hernando County Line CR 48 4 CR 48 SR-44 and Highland Blvd. 5 SR-44 and Highland Blvd. Montgomery Ave. 6 Montgomery Ave. Marion County Line 3 US-19 and 98 Hernando County Line CR-44/W. Fort Island Trail 3 CR-44/W. Fort Island Trail SR-44/NE 5th St. 6 SR-44/NE 5th St. NW 7th St. 4 NW 7th St. Levy County Line 3 SR-200 US-41 Marion County Line 3 SR-44 US-19 and 98 Joyner Rd. 6 Joyner Rd. 680 feet West of CR-581 3 680 feet West of CR-581 US-41/N. Florida Ave. 6 US-41/N. Florida Ave. US-41/S. Florida Ave. 6 US-41/S. Florida Ave. Sumter County Line 3 US-98 Hernando County Line US-19 4-3 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida, as follows: SECTION 2. AMENDMENT TO SECTION 4224. STATE HIGHWAY ACCESS

118 Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances ACCESS DESIGN CLASS FEATURES OPENING SPACING ACCESS DIRECTIONAL MEDIAN SPACING MINIMUM FULL MEDIAN SPACING (In Miles) MINIMUM SIGNAL SPACING (In Miles) 2 Restrictive with service roads 1320’/660’ * 1320’ 0.5 0.5 3 Restrictive 660’/440’* 1320’ 0.5 0.5 4 Nonrestrictive 660’/440’* N/A N/A 0.5 5 Restrictive 440’/245’* 660’ 0.5/0.5* 0.5/0.5* 6 Nonrestrictive 440’/245’* N/A N/A 0.25 7 Both 125’ 330’ 0.125 0.25 * Note: Greater than 45MPH/Less than or =45MPH B. US-19 Access Management Plan Standards The following access management standards for development activities are hereby established as the US-19 Access Management Plan standards for all development abutting the US-19 corridor commencing at the Hernando County Line and terminating at the Levy County line. This ordinance also includes those properties abutting US-19 that were within the County’s jurisdiction prior to the annexation adopted on April 26, 2004 by the City of Crystal River. 1. Access Plan Intent and Purpose: The intent and purpose of the US-19 Access Management Plan (hereinafter referred to as the Access Plan) is to, consistent with State law, guide the specific placement of driveways, medians, median openings, auxiliary turn lanes, and frontage and/or reverse frontage roadways along the US- 19 corridor. This Access Plan, in concert with the goals, objectives and policies of the Citrus County Comprehensive Plan and sound and generally accepted growth management and transportation engineering practices and principles, is designed as a peremptory planning instrument to mitigate future traffic congestion and vehicular safety concerns resulting from future development and background traffic growth along the US-19 corridor by, among other things, limiting and minimizing the number of traffic conflict points and locations. The Access Plan is intended to shorten queues of traffic, reduce vehicular congestion and balance the need to access property with the need of adequate traffic circulation and mobility on transportation facilities. Additionally, the intent of the Access Plan is to minimize access to environmentally sensitive lands. The planning of access management and adoption of access standards pertaining to the US-19 corridor will provide guidance relative to the location of driveways, medians, median opening locations, turn lane configurations, and driveway spacing, thereby improving the predictability of the development review process and otherwise enhance the process of reviewing development proposals.

Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance 119 2. Plan Runs with the US-19 Corridor: The Access Plan shall apply, to the maximum extent permitted by law, to the US-19 corridor commencing at the Hernando County Line and terminating at the Levy County line. The Access Plan shall be applicable, to the maximum extent permitted by State law, regardless of the local governmental jurisdiction of the properties located in the US-19 corridor. Annexation by a municipality of any property shall not affect the applicability of the Access Plan. 3. Access Classification: The FDOT has classified the roadway section specifically included in the Plan as an Access Class 3 facility. A Class 3 facility has restrictive (raised) medians, directional median opening minimal spacing of 1,320 feet, and full median opening minimal spacing of 2,640 feet. The Access Plan utilizes these standards as guidelines for the placement of median openings. 4. Frontage or Reverse Frontage Roads: Parcels that are adjacent to or in close proximity to frontage or reverse frontage roads as depicted in the Access Plan shall provide a connection to this roadway. As a condition of development approval, a development plan must provide for the construction of the section of frontage road or reverse frontage road that provides access to US-19 as identified in the Access Plan. This shall be accomplished as practical and may necessitate an escrow of funds and/or development agreement for future construction. 5. Joint and Cross Access: Each development plan shall provide for appropriate stub- outs to support cross access between adjacent parcels. 6. Driveway Spacing Standards: The minimum separation distance between adjacent driveways shall conform to the FDOT Access Management standards according to the assigned access design classification. The County shall require a minimum driveway spacing of 660 feet where feasible and practicable consistent with sound and generally accepted engineering practices and principles. 7. Driveway Throat Distances: The minimum length of driveways, or throat distance, shall vary based upon the proposed land use for the particular parcel of land and the projected daily and peak hour traffic volumes for the proposed development on the property. To minimize potential vehicle stacking that would present a traffic operational or safety concern on US-19, the minimum throat distance for any driveway subject to the Access Plan shall be the following: a. Sites generating up to 50 peak hour trips and with a right-turn lane - 40 feet; b. Sites generating up to 50 peak hour trips and no right-turn lane - 60 feet; c. Sites generating from 51 to 99 peak hour trips and with a right-turn lane - 75 feet; d. Sites generating from 51 to 99 peak hour trips and no right-turn lane - 100 feet; e. Sites generating 100 or more peak hour trips with a right-turn lane - 150 feet; f. Sites generating 100 or more peak hour trips and no right-turn lane - 200 feet.

120 Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances properties may be permitted to have only right-in and right-out driveway access on US-19 with all driveways located as far as and feasible, consistent with sound and generally accepted engineering practices and principles, away from the roadway intersection. 9. Continuous Right Turn Lanes: Development plans shall avoid the use of continuous right-turn lanes that access several contiguous properties. The use of shared, joint or cross access and interconnected parking lots and frontage roads shall be maximized in each development plan to accomplish property access along the US-19 corridor. Appropriate easements and other rights shall be deeded to the County, when appropriate, to implement this requirement. 10. Commercial Nodes: The Access Plan has been developed to be consistent with and compatible to the provisions of the Citrus County LDC, Sections 4922, 4923, and 4924 for Community, General, and Regional Commercial Nodes, respectively. Full median openings depicted on the Access Plan within these nodes have been located to meet, to the greatest extent feasible and practicable consistent with sound and generally accepted engineering practices and principles, the spacing requirement of 2,640 feet as specified in the aforementioned Sections. 11. Wetland/Environmentally Sensitive Areas: Environmentally sensitive areas have been tentatively identified in the Access Plan and access to these areas has been reasonably limited. Consistent with the objective of preserving environmentally sensitive lands, access over properties identified as such lands is prohibited; provided, however, that the owner or developer may apply for a variance pursuant to the provisions of this Ordinance and as otherwise provided in the Citrus County LDC. The specific limits of the environmentally sensitive areas shall be verified and depicted in each development plan prior to the review and approval of the development plan. The intent of the Access Plan is to minimize any disturbance of all environmentally sensitive lands while providing for the reasonable use of developable property and reasonable access to property. 12. Minimum Lot Widths: The depth of any lot shall not exceed three times its width. In addition, the minimum lot width for purposes of this plan shall be 100 feet for residential lots and 150 feet for nonresidential lots. Lot aggregation for purposes of proposed development plans shall be encouraged for any parcels of record that do not meet this requirement and cause adverse impacts to traffic circulation. 13. Lot Splits: No new or additional access rights will be permitted for properties that are created as the result of parcel or lot splits subsequent to the enactment of this Ordinance. 14. Deviations/Variances from Standards: The applicant for any development plan shall have the burden of providing substantial competent evidence including, but not limited to, evidence from a licensed Florida professional engineer or other expert in the field of transportation/land use planning, demonstrating hardship and unique conditions that prohibit a development plan from conforming with the requirements of the Access Plan. The applicant must provide compelling data and analysis to the County that a requested variance would improve traffic circulation 8. Isolated Corner Properties: Properties located at the intersection of a roadway and US-19 are considered isolated corner properties and development on such

Citrus County US-19 Access Management Plan Ordinance 121 lower functional classification than US-19; and that there is no possible access from a joint and cross access agreement, shared driveway, frontage road or reverse frontage road. The deviations from standards process shall be consistent with the County’s Level 2 review process, and shall include a public notification process approved by appropriate County staff. Decisions from the County’s Level 2 review process shall be forwarded to the FDOT, District 7, Access Management Review Committee, for review and consideration. 15. Interim Access: Any access point or median opening that does not comply with one (1) or more provisions of this Subsection may be designated as Interim Access upon approval by the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) or Community Development Director based upon the requisite and competent evidence being submitted by the applicant and accepted by the County. In all cases where the access is designated as Interim Access, such access shall be specifically noted on the site plan or subdivision plan submitted for approval. The requirement to provide subsequent alternative access shall run with the property and be a condition of development approval. The future planned alternative access shall be specifically identified. When the property is capable of being served by an alternate means of access, the Community Development Director or PDRB shall require that the Interim Access be eliminated or altered, at the cost of the applicant, and that the property utilize the new access location that is consistent with the provisions of this Subsection. 16. Interchange Management Area: At the time of adoption of this ordinance, Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise is evaluating the feasibility of the extension of the Suncoast Parkway, which currently terminates at US-98 in south Citrus County. The feasibility evaluation includes the termination of the proposed Suncoast Parkway extension at US-19 north of County Road 488 near Basswood Avenue. If this proposed termination is determined to be feasible, and subsequent planning and design activities are funded by Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise, Citrus County will implement sound and generally accepted growth management and transportation engineering practices to this interchange area to mitigate potential traffic congestion and vehicular safety concerns resulting from the interchange and potential development within the interchange area. The specific provisions to be utilized within the generally defined boundary of the Suncoast Parkway and US- 19 Interchange Management Area will be consistent with the provisions stated in this ordinance for the US-19 corridor. For purposes of access management planning, the limits of the Interchange Management Area shall be a minimum of 2,640 feet north and south of end of the interchange ramp tapers at US-19. SECTION 3. CONFLICTS. (a) The provisions of Section 335.184, Florida Statutes, and the rules of the Florida Department of Transportation as set forth in Chapter 14-97, Florida Administrative Code, are applicable in the jurisdictional limits of Citrus County, Florida, and supersede this Ordinance in the event of any irreconcilable conflict. (b) All ordinances or part of ordinances in conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are hereby repealed. and efficiency of and the general safety of the citizens of Citrus County and the traveling public on US-19; that no alternative access exists from a street with a

122 Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances SECTION 5. CODIFICATION. This Ordinance shall be codified in the Land Development Code of Citrus County. The Code codifier is granted authority to change the words “Ordinance” and other words to reflect the Part, Section, Article, etc., assigned in the Code, except that Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 shall not be codified. The recitals, except for the last recital, to this Ordinance shall be codified as the legislative intent for the enactment of this Ordinance. The Exhibits to this Ordinance shall be codified. SECTION 6. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Ordinance shall become effective in accordance with the provisions of Section 125, Florida Statutes. SECTION 4. SEVERABILITY. If any provision of this Ordinance or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder shall nevertheless be given full force and effect, and to this end the provisions of this Ordinance are declared severable.

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FAST Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (2015) FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TDC Transit Development Corporation TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S. DOT United States Department of Transportation

Incorporating Roadw ay A ccess M anagem ent into Local O rdinances N CH RP Synthesis 549 TRB TRA N SPO RTATIO N RESEA RCH BO A RD 500 Fifth Street, N W W ashington, D C 20001 A D D RESS SERV ICE REQ U ESTED N O N -PR O FIT O R G . U .S. PO STA G E PA ID C O LU M B IA , M D PER M IT N O . 88 ISBN 978-0-309-48118-2 9 7 8 0 3 0 9 4 8 1 1 8 2 9 0 0 0 0

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Managing access connections to roadways is vital to safety and operational performance of roadways for all users. Given the separation of authority between state and local governments over land development and access, intergovernmental coordination is integral to effective access management.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Synthesis 549: Incorporating Roadway Access Management into Local Ordinances documents regulatory tools and practices used by local governments to implement access management, as well as provides examples of how state transportation agencies are coordinating with local governments to advance access management objectives.

The review of local ordinances and state and local government coordination practices indicates that access management is being actively implemented throughout the United States. Typical features of local ordinances reviewed included access classification schemes and corresponding spacing standards, interparcel cross access requirements, intersection functional area or corner clearance standards, limits on driveways per site, unified access and circulation requirements for outparcels, allowances for deviations from standards, and access permitting and development (site plan) review procedures and criteria.

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