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Measuring Alternative Work Arrangements for Research and Policy (2020)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Measuring Alternative Work Arrangements for Research and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25822.
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Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Measuring Alternative Work Arrangements for Research and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25822.
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Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Measuring Alternative Work Arrangements for Research and Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25822.
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Page 90

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members SUSAN N. HOUSEMAN (Chair) is vice president and director of research at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. She also serves as research fellow at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), an international research organization based in Bonn, Germany, and as a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Conference on Research in Income and Wealth. Dr. Houseman is chair of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (Technical Advisory Committee), member of the American Economic Association (Committee on Government Relations), cochair of the Labor and Employment Relations Association (ASSA Program Committee), and codirector of the IZA Program on Labor Statistics. An expert on temporary- help employment, outsourcing, and nonstandard work arrangements, her research has examined trends in employers’ use of these arrangements and their implications for workers’ wages, benefits, and employment stability. Dr. Houseman’s research interests also include outsourcing, offshoring, older workers’ and retirement issues, and comparative labor market policies. She has written extensively on such topics as employment, worker compensation, and offshoring. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. KATHARINE G. ABRAHAM is professor of economics and survey methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is also chair of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth and coordinator of the Program on Labor Market Statistics at IZA. Dr. Abraham serves as a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago’s Academic Advisory Committee, the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisers, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis Advisory Committee. She formerly served as chair of the Commission on Evidence-based Policymaking, as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and as commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Dr. Abraham is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Society of Labor Economists. Her published research includes papers on the contingent workforce, domestic outsourcing, the work and retirement decisions of older Americans, student financial aid, unemployment and job vacancies, and the measurement of economic activity. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. ANNETTE BERNHARDT is director of the Low-wage Work Program at the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education, and senior researcher at the UC Berkeley Institute for Research on Labor and Employment. She sits on numerous advisory committees and boards for nonprofits, research projects, and foundation initiatives. Dr. Bernhardt was one of the principal investigators in the National Employment Law Project’s landmark 2009 study documenting high rates of minimum wage, overtime, and other workplace violations in the low-wage labor market. 88

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Her current research focuses on domestic outsourcing, the gig economy, and the impact of new technologies on low-wage work. She is widely published in journals in the fields of sociology and labor economics. Dr. Bernhardt has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. JENNIFER DYKEMA is distinguished scientist and senior survey methodologist at the University of Wisconsin Survey Center (UWSC) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Dr. Dykema’s research focuses on issues related to questionnaire design, interviewer effects, interaction in the survey interview, and methods to increase response rates. Her research has appeared in numerous journals in the fields of sociology, survey methodology, and statistics, as well as major edited volumes on survey research, questionnaire design, and evaluation and testing. Dr. Dykema is on the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) advisory committee for Public Opinion Quarterly, and holds memberships in the American Sociological Association, American Association for Public Opinion Research, Center for Demography and Ecology, and Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. DIANA FARRELL is founding president and chief executive officer of the JPMorgan Chase Institute. Prior to holding that position, she was a senior partner at McKinsey & Company, where she was global head of the McKinsey Center for Government and the McKinsey Global Institute. Ms. Farrell served in the White House as deputy director of the National Economic Council and as deputy assistant to the President on economic policy (2009–2011). During her White House tenure, she led interagency processes and stakeholder management of a broad portfolio of economic initiatives, including financial reform, housing, and innovation. She currently serves on the boards of directors for eBay, The Urban Institute, and the National Bureau of Economic Research, and is a trustee emeritus of Wesleyan University. In addition, Ms. Farrell is a trustee of the Trilateral Commission and served as a cochair of the World Economic Forum’s Council on Economic Progress. She is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Club of New York, the Aspen Strategy Group, and the Bretton Woods Committee. She has an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School and a B.A. from Wesleyan University. ARNE L. KALLEBERG is Kenan distinguished professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he is also chair of the curriculum in global studies and adjunct professor of public policy and management. Dr. Kalleberg also serves as distinguished research fellow in the Center for Strategy and Leadership at the Foundation for Research in Economics and Business Administration in Bergen, Norway. He has published extensively in the areas of the sociology of work, occupations, and organizations; economy and society; and social stratification and inequality. He is editor in chief of Social Forces, an international journal of social research, as well as serving on the editorial boards of numerous publications. His research has been supported by numerous foundations in the United States and abroad. Dr. Kalleberg is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Labor and Employment Relations Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. KRISTEN M. OLSON is Leland J. and Dorothy H. Olson professor in sociology and vice chair in the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Dr. Olson’s research 89

Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs includes examining interviewer effects, paradata, the intersection of nonresponse and measurement errors, within-household selection in self-administered surveys, and questionnaire design. Her work has appeared in numerous journals in the fields of statistics, public opinion research, and survey and other research methods in the social sciences. She serves on the editorial board of several publications, including Sociological Methodology and The Sociological Quarterly, and holds memberships in several organizations, including the American Sociological Association. Dr. Olson has been elected as conference chair for the American Association for Public Opinion Research and is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a Ph.D. in survey methodology from the University of Michigan. BARBARA R. ROBLES is principal economist in the Consumer and Community Research Unit for the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC. Her research interests include monetary policy, community economic development, Internet research, and regional economic development. Her professional affiliations include the American Economic Association, American Statistical Association, Urban Economics Association, and American Association of Public Opinion Researchers. Dr. Robles has served as referee for numerous publications, including American Economic Review; Journal of Family and Economic Issues; Journal of Consumer Education; Sociological Quarterly; International Migration Review; and Journal of Consumer Affairs. She has written and presented extensively on such topics as Latino employment and entrepreneurship, the gig economy, and low-income communities. Dr. Robles has a Ph.D in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park. MICHAEL R. STRAIN is Arthur F. Burns scholar in political economy and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) in Washington, DC. He also serves as a research fellow at the Institute for Labor Economics (IZA). His research, which focuses on labor economics, public finance, and social policy, has been published in peer- reviewed academic journals and in policy journals. He is the author or editor of several books on the subjects of public policy and its effects on the U.S. labor market, political philosophy and economic freedom, and the American dream. Dr. Strain has a Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University. DAVID WEIL is dean and professor at The Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Prior to joining the Heller School, he served as administrator of the Wage and Hour Division at the United States Department of Labor under President Obama. Dr. Weil is an internationally recognized expert in employment and labor market policy as well as regulation, transparency policy, and the impacts of industry restructuring on employment and work outcomes and business performance. He has advised both international organizations and U.S. agencies at the state and federal levels on employment, labor, and workplace policies. He cofounded and codirects the Transparency Policy Project at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and he is the author of more than 125 articles and five books. He has received many awards, including the fall 2019 Frances Perkins Intelligence and Courage Award. Dr. Weil has a Ph.D. degree in public policy from Harvard University. 90

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Business structures, employment relationships, job characteristics, and worker outcomes have changed in the United States over the last few decades—in some ways unpredictably. A high level of interest exists among policy makers and researchers in addressing concerns about the future of work in the United States. These concerns are heightened by the perceived fracturing of relationships between workers and employers, the loss of safety net protections and benefits to workers, the growing importance of access to skills and education as the impacts of new technologies and automation are felt, and the market-based pressure that companies face to produce short-term profits, sometimes at the expense of long-term value.

These issues, as well as related ones such as wage stagnation and job quality, are often associated with alternative work arrangements (AWAs)—which include independent-contractor and other nonemployee jobs, work through intermediaries such as temporary help agencies and other contract companies, and work with unpredictable schedules—although they also pertain to many standard jobs. A better understanding of the magnitude of and trends in AWAs, along with the implications for job quality, is needed to develop appropriate policies in response to the changing nature of work.

Measuring Alternative Work Arrangements for Research and Policy reviews the Contigent Worker Supplement (CWS) of the Current Population Survey (CPS) for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in the U.S. Department of Labor. The CWS provides key measures of temporary (contingent) work, alternative work arrangements, and the “gig” economy. Disagreements, however, exist among researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders about the definitions and measures of these concepts and priorities for future data collection. The report also reviews measures of employment, earnings, and worker well-being in temporary and alternative work arrangements that can be estimated using household survey data, such as those generated by the CWS, as well as measures that can be produced using administrative, commercial, and combined data sources. The comparative advantages and complementarities of different data sources will be assessed, as well as methodological issues underpinning BLS’s measurement objectives.

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