National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
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Page 157
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
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Page 158
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 162
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Workshop Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25863.
×
Page 164

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B Public Workshop Agendas First Committee Meeting May 28, 2019 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington DC 20001 Keck Center, Room 103 1:00 p.m. Welcome to the Open Session Ellen MacKenzie, Committee Chair 1:10 p.m. Presentations and Discussion on the Scope and Context of Study Charge (20 minutes of opening remarks followed by 45-minute question-and-answer period) Alex Amparo Assistant Administrator, National Preparedness Directorate Federal Emergency Management Agency Anthony Macintyre Senior Medical Advisor, Department of Homeland Security Office of Health Affairs Medical Liaison Officer, Federal Emergency Management Agency Justin Pelletier Legislative Director, Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (NY-07) 2:15 p.m. Assessing Mortality After Disaster—Hurricane Maria Case Study • Provide the background and context for your study of mortality following Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. • Discuss the main considerations for selecting the study design and the major challenges associated with its implementation. • Identify lessons learned for the future in terms of quantifying mortality and serious morbidity following large-scale disasters. (20 minutes of opening remarks followed by 55-minute question-and-answer period) PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS B-1

B-2 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY Lynn Goldman Dean, Milken Institute of Public Health, The George Washington University Caroline Buckee Associate Professor, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health 3:30 p.m. ADJOURN Second Committee Meeting DAY 1: August 29, 2019 OPEN SESSION Time Session 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks • Ellen MacKenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health SESSION 1: HURRICANE MARIA IN PUERTO RICO—CASE STUDY 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 9:15–10:45 Moderator: Maureen Lichtveld, Committee Member, Tulane University School of a.m. Public Health and Tropical Medicine Panelists: • Francisco Murphy Rivera, Physician, Adjuntas, Puerto Rico • José Cordero, Department Head, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Georgia • Maria M. Juiz Gallego, Supervisor of the Division of Quality Assurance, Demographic Registry of Puerto Rico • Judith Mitrani-Reiser, Director of the Disaster and Failure Studies Program, National Institute of Standards and Technology 10:45– BREAK 11:00 a.m. SESSION 2: FLORIDA SYSTEM FOR ASSESSING POST-DISASTER MORTALITY AND SIGNIFICANT MORBIDITY—CASE STUDY 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 11:00 Moderator: Charles Rothwell, Committee Member, National Center for Health a.m.–12:30 Statistics (retired) p.m. Panelists: PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B B-3 • Carina Blackmore, State Epidemiologist and Director, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health • Kenneth Jones, State Registrar, Florida Department of Health • Stephen Nelson, District 10 Medical Examiner and Chairman of the Florida Medical Examiners Commission • Sandon Speedling, Health Officer, Florida Department of Health 12:30 p.m. LUNCH SESSION 3: CURRENT CAPABILITIES IN ASSESSING AND USING MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DATA IN REAL TIME DURING A LARGE-SCALE DISASTER 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 1:15–2:45 Moderator: Sue Anne Bell, Committee Member, University of Michigan School of p.m. Nursing Panelists: • Tara Das, State Registrar, Texas Department of State Health Services • Edward Kilbane, Physician–Forensic Pathologist, National Disaster Medical System • Mac McClendon, Director of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Harris County Public Health • Rebecca Noe, Epidemiologist, Capacity Building Branch, Center for Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2:45–3:00 BREAK p.m. SESSION 4: CURRENT CAPABILITIES IN ASSESSING AND USING MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DATA DURING THE INTER-DISASTER PERIOD 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 3:00–4:30 Moderator: W. Craig Vanderwagen, Committee Member, East West Protection, LLC p.m. Panelists: • Dee Ann Bagwell, Policy and Planning Director, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health • Carla Britton, Senior Epidemiologist, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium • Devin George, State Registrar, Louisiana Department of Health • Amy Davidow, Associate Professor, Rutgers School of Public Health • Chesley Richards, Deputy Director for Public Health Science and Surveillance, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 4:30 p.m. ADJOURN Open Session PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

B-4 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY DAY 2: August 30, 2019 OPEN SESSION Time Session 8:30 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks • Ellen MacKenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health SESSION 5: LOOKING FORWARD—BEST PRACTICES AND TOOLS FOR ASSESSING AND USING MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DATA DURING A LARGE-SCALE DISASTER IN REAL TIME 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 8:45–10:15 Moderator: Richard Serino, Committee Member, Harvard T.H. Chan School of a.m. Public Health Panelists: • Tegan Boehmer, Chief, Health Studies Section, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention • Kelly Baker, Registrar, Vital Records, Oklahoma State Department of Health • Frank DePaolo, Deputy Commissioner for Forensic Operations, City of New York 10:15– BREAK 10:30 a.m. SESSION 6: LOOKING FORWARD—BEST PRACTICES AND TOOLS FOR ASSESSING AND USING MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY DATA DURING THE INTER-DISASTER PERIOD 90 minutes (5 minutes for opening remarks followed by moderated discussion and Q&A) 10:30 Moderator: Elizabeth Frankenberg, Committee Member, University of North a.m.–12:00 Carolina p.m. Panelists: • Steven Schwartz, Director, Division of Vital Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention • Umair Shah, Director, Harris County Public Health • Skip Skivington, Vice President of Health Care Continuity Management and Support Services, Kaiser Permanente • Kevin Yeskey, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response PUBLIC COMMENT 30-minute session PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B B-5 12:00– Moderator: Ellen MacKenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of 12:30 p.m. Public Health • Members of the public are invited to sign up to provide comments on the workshop topic (3 minutes each) 12:30 p.m. ADJOURN Open Session Third Committee Meeting DAY 1: October 7, 2019 OPEN SESSION Time Session SESSION 1: COMMITTEE BREAKFAST 9:00–10:00 Moderator: Ellen Mackenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of a.m. Public Health Panelist: Sacramento County Coroner Kimberly Gin will join the committee breakfast to discuss her office’s work during the Camp Fire in Paradise. 10:00 a.m. ADJOURN and DEPART for Paradise SESSION 2: PARADISE TOWN HALL 1:00–2:30 Moderator: Ellen Mackenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of p.m. Public Health Panelists: Various representatives from the fire department, law enforcement, health care providers and administrators, civil leaders, town hall staff, and key community members will come discuss their experiences during the Camp Fire in Paradise. 2:45 p.m. ADJOURN and DEPART for Butte County SESSION 3: BUTTE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 3:15–4:45 Moderator: Ellen Mackenzie, Committee Chair, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of p.m. Public Health Panelists: Various representatives from the fire department, law enforcement, health care providers and administrators, civil leaders, town hall staff, and key community members will come discuss their experiences during the Camp Fire in Paradise. 5:00 p.m. ADJOURN and DEPART for Sacramento Webinar: Methodological Considerations for the Estimation of Disaster-Related Morbidity and Mortality at a Population Level PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

B-6 A FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY Tuesday, February 11, 2020 2:30–4:30 p.m. ET The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Best Practices for Assessing Mortality and Significant Morbidity Following Large-Scale Disasters is hosting this webinar as part of the committee’s broader effort to learn from the perspectives of researchers who are using a variety of analytical approaches to estimate population size and disaster impact on human health. The committee’s Statement of Task can be found on the last page of this agenda. The committee is specifically interested in learning more about the following: 1. Generalizing from your experience with custom analyses of individual disasters, what best practices or standards may exist for estimating disaster-related mortality and morbidity across different disaster types, sizes, and locations? 2. Experiences with the challenge of measuring disaster exposure and selecting methodological approaches for addressing issues like in- and out-migration. 3. Perspectives on using existing federal surveys (barriers, necessary data items, etc.) in such studies, as well as the essential role of spot, custom survey data collection. 4. Potential roles that researchers can play to support state and local stakeholders in analyzing morbidity and mortality data. 5. Recommendations on what is needed (resources, tools, partnerships, etc.) to develop more accurate and timely estimates of disaster impact. 2:30 p.m. Welcome and Panel 1 Introduction Elizabeth Frankenberg, Carolina Population Center, Committee Member 2:40 p.m. Panel 1: Survey-Based Methods for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity Rafael Irizarry, Harvard University Jessica Ho, University of Southern California 3:00 p.m. Discussion with Committee 3:30 p.m. Panel 2 Introduction H. Russell Bernard, Arizona State University, Committee Member 3:40 p.m. Panel 2: Methods for Estimating Hard-to-Count Populations Adrian Raftery, University of Washington Tyler McCormick, University of Washington 4:00 p.m. Discussion with Committee 4:30 p.m. Adjourn Webinar Webinar: Methodological Considerations for Estimating Excess Mortality and Morbidity PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX B B-7 Tuesday, February 18, 2020 2:30–4:00 p.m. ET The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Best Practices for Assessing Mortality and Significant Morbidity Following Large-Scale Disasters is hosting this webinar as part of the committee’s broader effort to learn from the perspectives of researchers who are using excess mortality to assess disaster impact. The committee’s Statement of Task can be found on the last page of this agenda. Rather than the findings from the research, the committee is specifically interested in learning more about the methodological challenges researchers face in conducting such research and how these challenges can be addressed, including: 1. Critical assumptions that must be made and what is needed to make better informed assumptions. 2. The identification of accurate baseline data and coping with a lack of baseline data. 3. The selection of exposed and comparison populations across different disaster contexts, determinations of which outcomes to measure (including causes of death and morbidity), when to measure them, and for how long. 4. Selection of statistical methods when using large databases that lead to more precise estimates. 5. Addressing privacy and confidential concerns and other barriers to data sharing and use. 6. Potential roles that researchers can play to support state and local stakeholders and federal policy makers in analyzing morbidity and mortality data. 7. Recommendations on what is needed (resources, tools, partnerships, etc.) to develop more accurate and timely estimates of disaster impact. 2:30 p.m. Welcome and Panel Introduction Michael Stoto, Georgetown University, Committee Member Sue Anne Bell, University of Michigan, Committee Member 2:40 p.m. Panel Presentations Scott Zeger, Johns Hopkins University [accepted] Troy Quast, University of South Florida [accepted] 3:00 p.m. Discussion with Committee 4:30 p.m. Adjourn Webinar PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

Next: Appendix C: Assessing Morbidity and Mortality Associated with the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study Illustrating the Need for the Recommendations in This Report »
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In the wake of a large-scale disaster, from the initial devastation through the long tail of recovery, protecting the health and well-being of the affected individuals and communities is paramount. Accurate and timely information about mortality and significant morbidity related to the disaster are the cornerstone of the efforts of the disaster management enterprise to save lives and prevent further health impacts. Conversely, failure to accurately capture mortality and significant morbidity data undercuts the nation's capacity to protect its population. Information about disaster-related mortality and significant morbidity adds value at all phases of the disaster management cycle. As a disaster unfolds, the data are crucial in guiding response and recovery priorities, ensuring a common operating picture and real-time situational awareness across stakeholders, and protecting vulnerable populations and settings at heightened risk.

A Framework for Assessing Mortality and Morbidity After Large-Scale Disasters reviews and describes the current state of the field of disaster-related mortality and significant morbidity assessment. This report examines practices and methods for data collection, recording, sharing, and use across state, local, tribal, and territorial stakeholders; evaluates best practices; and identifies areas for future resource investment.

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