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A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level (2020)

Chapter: Appendix A: Public Session Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 170
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
×
Page 171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Session Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25876.
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Page 172

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Appendix A Public Session Agendas T he committee held two meetings that were open to the public. The first took place on August 16, 2019, in Washington, D.C. The second took place on October 7–8, 2019; it was held as an online conference on October 7 and in Washington, D.C, on October 8. Committee on A Systems Approach to Reducing Consumer Food Waste Open Meeting 1 Friday, August 16, 2019 8:00 AM–12:30 PM ET PERSPECTIVES FROM THE SPONSORS Moderator: Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 8:00 Welcome Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 8:05 Perspectives from the Foundation of Food and Agriculture Research Sally Rockey, Executive Director 8:25 Perspectives from The Walmart Foundation Eileen Hyde, Director of Hunger and Healthy Eating (by Zoom) 8:40 Q&A 169

170 NATIONAL STRATEGY TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE PERSPECTIVES FROM RESEARCHERS Moderator: Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 8:50 Household Food Waste: Lessons from around the Globe Tom Quested, Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) Global (by Zoom) 9:10 Reducing Consumer Food Waste: Insights from the Guelph Food Waste Research Group Kate Parizeau, University of Guelph 9:30 Consumer-level Wasted Food: Insights, Ideas and Lessons Learned Ashley Zanolli, Emerging Possibility LLC 9:50 Q&A 10:15 Break 10:30 Wasted Food in Oregon:  Recent Research Findings and Next Steps Elaine Blaitt, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (by Zoom) 10:50 Peeling Back Layers of the Wasted Onion: Root Causes of Consumer Food Waste and Shifting the Environment around Them Dana Gunders, Next Course, LLC (by Zoom) 11:10 Experiences from the Hospitality and Food Service Industries Pete Pearson, World Wildlife Fund 11:30 Wise Psychological Interventions Greg Walton, Stanford University (by Zoom) 11:50 Q&A 12:30 Open session adjourns

APPENDIX A 171 Committee on A Systems Approach to Reducing Consumer Food Waste Open Meeting 2 Monday, October 7, 2019 4:30–5:15 PM ET Moderator: Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 4:15 Welcome Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 4:20 The Value of Packaging as a Strategy to Prevent Food Waste in America Martin Gooch, VCM-International (by Zoom) 4:40 Q&A 5:00 Open Session Adjourns Tuesday, October 8, 2019 8:30 AM–1:40 PM ET 8:30 Registration Moderator: Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair 9:00 Welcome Barbara Schneeman, Committee Chair Session 1: Trends in Food Distribution and Purchasing 9:05 Understanding Consumption Habits to Influence Food Waste Darren Seifer, The NDP Group 9:25 Q&A Session 2: Learning from Other Disciplines 9:40 Lessons from Psychological Research on Recycling, Energy Use, and Composting Alex Maki, American Association for the Advancement of Science

172 NATIONAL STRATEGY TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE 10:00 A Community-Based Environmental Change Intervention to Sustain Weight Reduction Christina Economos, Tufts University (by Zoom) 10:20 Q&A Session 3: Potential Technological and Policy Interventions 10:40 Save the Food Campaign Erik Olson, Natural Resources Defense Council Andrea Spacht Collins, Natural Resources Defense Council (by Zoom) 11:00 The Science of Behavior Change: How to Maximize Reductions in Food Waste at the Consumer Level Corby Martin, Pennington Biomedical Research Center 11:20 Food Waste and Food Security Policies in Washington State Katie Rains, Washington State Department of Agriculture (by Zoom) 11:40 Q&A 12:00 Lunch 1:00 The Power of Social Movements and Civic Activism to Bring About Social Change Dana Fisher, University of Maryland 1:25 Q&A 1:45 Open Session Adjourns

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Approximately 30 percent of the edible food produced in the United States is wasted and a significant portion of this waste occurs at the consumer level. Despite food's essential role as a source of nutrients and energy and its emotional and cultural importance, U.S. consumers waste an estimated average of 1 pound of food per person per day at home and in places where they buy and consume food away from home. Many factors contribute to this waste—consumers behaviors are shaped not only by individual and interpersonal factors but also by influences within the food system, such as policies, food marketing and the media. Some food waste is unavoidable, and there is substantial variation in how food waste and its impacts are defined and measured. But there is no doubt that the consequences of food waste are severe: the wasting of food is costly to consumers, depletes natural resources, and degrades the environment. In addition, at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has severely strained the U.S. economy and sharply increased food insecurity, it is predicted that food waste will worsen in the short term because of both supply chain disruptions and the closures of food businesses that affect the way people eat and the types of food they can afford.

A National Strategy to Reduce Food Waste at the Consumer Level identifies strategies for changing consumer behavior, considering interactions and feedbacks within the food system. It explores the reasons food is wasted in the United States, including the characteristics of the complex systems through which food is produced, marketed, and sold, as well as the many other interconnected influences on consumers' conscious and unconscious choices about purchasing, preparing, consuming, storing, and discarding food. This report presents a strategy for addressing the challenge of reducing food waste at the consumer level from a holistic, systems perspective.

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