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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Genomic Epidemiology Data Infrastructure Needs for SARS-CoV-2: Modernizing Pandemic Response Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25879.
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Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Genomic Epidemiology Data Infrastructure Needs for SARS-CoV-2: Modernizing Pandemic Response Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25879.
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Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Genomic Epidemiology Data Infrastructure Needs for SARS-CoV-2: Modernizing Pandemic Response Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25879.
×
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Public Committee Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Genomic Epidemiology Data Infrastructure Needs for SARS-CoV-2: Modernizing Pandemic Response Strategies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25879.
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Page 82

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix B Public Committee Meeting Agendas The committee held three in-person meetings in June 2020, and portions of two of the meetings were open to the public. The agendas for these open sessions are included in this appendix. To inform the committee’s deliberations, various information-gathering mechanisms were used throughout the study: 1. The committee’s first in-person meeting in June 2020 included an open session where a representative from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s SARS-CoV-2 Sequencing for Public Health Emergency Response, Epidemiology, and Surveillance (SPHERES) Program provided its perspectives on the charge to the committee and state and local monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 in order to provide additional background information and context for the study. 2. The committee’s second in-person meeting in June 2020 included a public session where the committee heard from researchers operating in three major areas: (1) those studying genomic data, precision epidemiology, and the intersection of emerging infectious disease data sources; (2) those with in-depth knowledge regarding the considerations around the sharing, linkage, and public health application of genomic, epidemiologic, and clinical data; and (3) those who can speak to the lessons learned from previous approaches and existing initiatives. These helped the committee to better understand the nature of the data needs space, as well as the challenges experienced. PUBLIC AGENDAS Friday, June 12, 2020 Virtual Meeting OPEN SESSION PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS 79

SESSION III Sponsor Briefing: Discussion of the Committee’s Charge Objective: To hear from the sponsors of the study regarding their perspectives on the charge to the committee. 4:15 p.m. Welcome and Introductions DIANE GRIFFIN, Committee Chair Vice President National Academy of Sciences University Distinguished Service Professor W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 4:20 p.m. Sponsor Perspective on Charge to the Committee DAVID (CHRIS) HASSELL, Sponsor Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 4:30 p.m. Discussion with Committee 4:40 p.m. SARS-CoV-2 Sequencing for Public Health Emergency Response, Epidemiology, and Surveillance (SPHERES) Program DUNCAN MACCANNELL Chief Science Officer Office of Advanced Molecular Detection National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 4:50 p.m. Discussion with Committee 5:00 p.m. ADJOURN OPEN SESSION Tuesday, April 24, 2018 Virtual Meeting OPEN SESSION 3:15 p.m. Welcome and Introductions DIANE GRIFFIN, Committee Chair Vice President National Academy of Sciences University Distinguished Service Professor PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS 80

W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 3:20 p.m. Speaker Session 1: Genomic Data, Precision Epidemiology, and Working at the Intersection of Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sources JOSEPH DERISI Professor, Biochemistry and Biophysics University of California, San Francisco Co-President Chan Zuckerberg Biohub ALEX GRENINGER Assistant Professor, Laboratory Medicine University of Washington School of Medicine Assistant Director, Clinical Virology Laboratory University of Washington Medical Center 3:30 p.m. Discussion with Committee 3:50 p.m. Speaker Session 2: Considerations Around the Sharing, Linkage, and Public Health Application of Genomic, Epidemiologic, and Clinical Data THERESA COLECCHIA Senior Associate General Counsel Office of the Vice President and General Counsel Johns Hopkins University CHRISTOPHER CHUTE Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Health Informatics Professor of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing Chief Research Information Officer, Johns Hopkins Medicine Deputy Director, Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Division of General Internal Medicine Johns Hopkins University JILL TAYLOR Director, Wadsworth Center New York State Department of Health 4:05 p.m. Discussion with Committee 4:30 p.m. Speaker Session 3: Learning from Previous Approaches and Existing Initiatives PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS 81

PARDIS SABETI Professor, Immunology and Infectious Diseases Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Professor, Harvard FAS Center for Systems Biology Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Institute Member, Broad Institute Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute EMIL LESHO Infectious Disease Specialist Rochester Regional Health Professor of Medicine Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences 4:40 p.m. Discussion with Committee 5:00 p.m. ADJOURN OPEN SESSION PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS 82

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In December 2019, new cases of severe pneumonia were first detected in Wuhan, China, and the cause was determined to be a novel beta coronavirus related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus that emerged from a bat reservoir in 2002. Within six months, this new virus—SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)—has spread worldwide, infecting at least 10 million people with an estimated 500,000 deaths. COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, was declared a public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and a pandemic on March 11, 2020. To date, there is no approved effective treatment or vaccine for COVID-19, and it continues to spread in many countries.

Genomic Epidemiology Data Infrastructure Needs for SARS-CoV-2: Modernizing Pandemic Response Strategies lays out a framework to define and describe the data needs for a system to track and correlate viral genome sequences with clinical and epidemiological data. Such a system would help ensure the integration of data on viral evolution with detection, diagnostic, and countermeasure efforts. This report also explores data collection mechanisms to ensure a representative global sample set of all relevant extant sequences and considers challenges and opportunities for coordination across existing domestic, global, and regional data sources.

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