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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
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B

Workshop Agenda

MODELS TO INFORM PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE OF ELECTRIC POWER IN THE UNITED STATES

February 3, 2020
Beckman Center, Huntington Room
Irvine, California

A variety of models are used to support electric infrastructure planning and decision making by diverse stakeholders in settings that span local to regional scales. Many of these models reflect the electric system as historically configured, a configuration that remains largely true today. However, the electricity system is undergoing significant changes, such as growth of generation sources connected directly to distribution systems, increasing amounts of variable renewables and inverter-based generation, and pressures to electrify transportation and buildings’ energy uses so as to reduce carbon emissions. These changes—many of which may accelerate and deepen in future years—present challenges to conventional planning models, assumptions, and processes. This workshop will review recent models used in electricity system planning, and identify modeling and research needs as well as promising approaches to help plan the future of electric power in the United States.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
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8:30 AM Welcome

Granger Morgan,* Carnegie Mellon University and Committee Chair

8:35 AM Opening Keynote: Overview of Models Used in Electric System Analysis and Planning
John Weyant, Stanford University Energy Modeling Forum
9:15 AM Models Used for Long-Term Electric System Planning

Moderator: Karen Palmer,* Resources for the Future

David Daniels, U.S. Energy Information Administration

Dan Shawhan, Resources for the Future

John Bistline, Electric Power Research Institute

Bethany Frew, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

John Larsen, Rhodium Group

10:45 AM Break
11:00 AM Models Used for Transmission Planning

Moderator: Anjan Bose,* Washington State University

Joe Eto, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Thomas Overbye, Texas A&M University and PowerWorld Corporation

Douglas Welsh, General Electric

Branden Sudduth, Western Electricity Coordinating Council

Amos Ang, Southern California Edison

12:30 PM Lunch
1:30 PM Models Used for Distribution System Planning

Moderator: Susan Tierney,* Analysis Group

Jason Fuller, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Roger Dugan, Electric Power Research Institute

Aleksi Paaso, Commonwealth Edison

Colton Ching, Hawaiian Electric

John Lee, Xcel Energy

___________________

* Member of the National Academies Committee on the Future of Electric Power in the U.S.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
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3:00 PM Break
3:20 PM Case Study—Modeling to Support LADWP’s IRP and Stakeholder Engagement

Moderator: Reiko Kerr,* Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

James Barner, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Jay Lim, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Jaquelin Cochran, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Frederick Pickel, City of Los Angeles

4:40 PM Closing Keynote: The Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium and the North American Energy Resilience Model

John Grosh, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5:15 PM Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Models to Inform Planning for the Future of Electric Power in the United States: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25880.
×
Page 67
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Providing a reliable and resilient supply of electric power to communities across the United States has always posed a complex challenge. Utilities must support daily operations to serve a diverse array of customers across a heterogeneous landscape while simultaneously investing in infrastructure to meet future needs, all while juggling an enormous array of competing priorities influenced by costs, capabilities, environmental and social impacts, regulatory requirements, and consumer preferences. A rapid pace of change in technologies, policies and priorities, and consumer needs and behaviors has further compounded this challenge in recent years.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop on February 3, 2020 to explore strategies for incorporating new technologies, planning and operating strategies, business models, and architectures in the U.S. electric power system. Speakers and participants from industry, government, and academia discussed available models for long-term transmission and distribution planning, as well as the broader context of how these models are used and future opportunities and needs. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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