National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A: Search Strategy and Data Coding
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 194
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 195
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 196
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 198
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee and Staff Bios." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25912.
×
Page 200

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix B Committee and Staff Bios BARBARA M. MEANS (Chair) is executive director of Learning Sciences Research at Digital Promise. Previously the founder and director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, she is an educational psychologist whose research focuses on ways technology can support students’ learning of advanced skills and the revitalization of classrooms and schools. Her 2014 book, Learning Online: What Research Tells Us About Whether, When, and How, provides a critical appraisal of the research base for practices in online learning from kindergarten through higher education and adult learning. Means has been an author or editor for eight books on topics in education, learning technology, and education reform. She was a member of the National Academies committee that produced the report How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures. She earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. KAREN BRENNAN is an associate professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she directs the Creative Computing Lab. Her research is primarily concerned with the ways in which learning environments can be designed to cultivate young people's creativity and agency as learners and designers. Brennan’s research and teaching activities focus on constructionist approaches to designing learning environments—encouraging learning through designing, personalizing, connecting, and reflecting to maximize learner agency. She led the design and development of ScratchEd, an online environment for educators who are interested in supporting computational literacy. Brennan also received funding from the National Science Foundation for a project that documented the concepts, practices, and perspectives kids cultivate through computational design activities with the Scratch programming language. She has a B.Sc. in computer science and mathematics, a B.Ed. in computer science and mathematics, and a M.A. in curriculum studies from the University of British Columbia. Brennan completed her Ph.D. in media arts and sciences at the MIT Media Lab, where she was a member of the team that developed the Scratch programming environment. KERRY BRENNER is a senior program officer for the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is the lead staff person for the Roundtable on Systemic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education and for the Symposium on Imagining the Future of Undergraduate STEM Education. She was the study director for projects that produced the reports Undergraduate Research Experiences for STEM Students: Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities (2017) and Science and Engineering for Grades 6–12: Investigation and Design at the Center (2019). She led the planning of workshops on Recognizing and Evaluating Teaching of Science in Higher Education and one on Service Learning in Undergraduate Geosciences Education as well as helping to organize workshops on Increasing Student Success in Developmental Mathematics and a Convocation on Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum. In her past work with the National Acaemies’ Board on Life Sciences, she served as the study director for the project that produced Bio2010: Transforming Undergraduate Biology Education for Future Research Biologists. As an outgrowth of that study she participated in the founding of the National Academies Summer Institutes for Undergraduate Education. Along with other projects, she has led a standing committee for the U.S. Department of Defense on Medical Technologies, multiple Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-1

studies related to microbiology and biosecurity, and one on the decision making process for reopening facilities contaminated in biological attacks. She earned her bachelors' degree from Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT and her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Princeton University. STEPHANIE CHANG currently works as the director of Impact at Maker Ed, having spent five years previously leading and designing Maker Ed’s program offerings for educators and institutions around the country. Her current maker-centered work focuses on research and evaluation efforts related to educator practices and learning outcomes of youth, while also encompassing organizational development, sustainability, and storytelling. Chang’s work has been situated in experiential education, whether defined as STEM, STEAM, hands-on, project- based, or maker-centered. Overall, she is deeply interested in bridging formal and informal learning; working to best leverage the affordances of technology for learning; and designing inclusive, equitable, and authentic environments for learning and teaching. Prior to Maker Ed, Chang supported makerspaces and programs with 15 California high schools, worked in educational research, led science and technology summer programs, and taught environmental and marine science. She holds a Bachelor’s in biology from MIT and a Master’s degree from the Learning, Design, and Technology program at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education. SHAUNDRA B. DAILY is an associate professor of practice in electrical and computer engineering and computer science at Duke University. She is also co-founder and creative director of DEEP Designs, LLC. Prior to joining Duke, she was an associate professor at the University of Florida in the Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering. She also served as an associate professor and interim co-chair in the School of Computing at Clemson University. Daily’s research and teaching interests include promoting alternative pathways to engage with computing in order to diversify the computing landscape and developing and integrating applications of affective computing into a variety of contexts. She received NSF funding to develop new methods to utilize a virtual environment and movement as an embodied pedagogical approach to support computational thinking. Daily earned a B.S. and M.S. in electrical engineering from the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University—Florida State University College of Engineering, and a S.M. and Ph.D. in media art and sciences at the MIT Media Lab. CHERI FANCSALI is research director at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools, where she supervises the Research Alliance’s ongoing studies, ensuring the application of rigorous and appropriate study designs for each project, and helps develop effective collaborations with local stakeholders, as well as education researchers across the country. She has over two decades of experience in research and evaluations of school- and community-based educational programs that target underserved youth, with a strong focus on teacher effectiveness and professional development, school reform initiatives, STEM, afterschool programs, and socio-emotional learning. Currently, she is PI of an NSF STEM+C-funded project to develop teacher training and curricular supports to integrate computer science into science instruction; she also plays a lead role on projects to develop a framework for computer science integration across subjects at the elementary level. Previously, Fancsali was an early childhood and special education teacher in New York City and has taught graduate level courses in evaluation at Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-2

Teachers College, Columbia University. Fancsali holds a B.S. in special education from the University of Wisconsin, an M.S. in education policy from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in sociology and education from Columbia University. JUAN E. GILBERT is the Andrew Banks Family Preeminence Endowed Professor and Chair of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Department at the University of Florida where he leads the Human Experience Research Lab. Gilbert has research projects in advanced learning technologies, usability and accessibility, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI), AI/machine learning and Ethnocomputing (Culturally Relevant Computing). He is an ACM fellow, a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Inventors. Honors and awards include a mural painting in New York City by City Year New York (2006), the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring from President Barack Obama (2012), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2014 Mentor Award, and the 2018 Computer Research Association’s A. Nico Habermann Award. He recently was a member of the National Academies Committee on the Effective Mentoring in STEMM and is a Senior Member of the IEEE. He earned a B.S. in systems analysis from Miami University (Ohio) and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Cincinnati. JOANNA GOODE is the Sommerville Knight Professor in the College of Education at the University of Oregon. Her research examines issues of access and equity for underrepresented students of color and females in computer science education. For the past several years, she has studied the institutional and psychological reasons preventing many underrepresented young people from entering the computer science pipeline in high school. As a former urban high school mathematics and computer science teacher, Goode’s research considers the relationship between teacher development and opportunities to learn for students. She also serves as the director of a program aimed at preparing and supporting the efforts of LAUSD computer science educators in diversifying the high school computing pipeline. Goode earned her Ph.D. in the education division of urban schooling at the University of California, Los Angeles. MARK GUZDIAL is a professor in computer science and engineering and engineering education research at the University of Michigan. He studies how people come to understand computing and how to make that more effective. Dr. Guzdial was one of the founders of the International Computing Education Research conference. He also was one of the leads on the NSF alliance “Expanding Computing Education Pathways,” which helped US states improve and broaden their computing education. He invented and has written several books on the “Media Computation” contextualized approach to computing education. With Barbara Ericson, his wife and colleague, he received the 2010 Association for Computing Machinery Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator award. Guzdal is an ACM Distinguished Educator and a fellow of the ACM. His most recent book is Learner-Centered Design of Computing Education: Research on Computing for Everyone (Morgan & Claypool, 2015). He received the 2019 ACM SIGCSE Outstanding Contributions to Education award. He received his Ph.D. in education and computer science (a joint degree) at the University of Michigan. MIZUKO ITO is a cultural anthropologist of technology use, examining children and youth’s changing relationships to media and communications. Her work centers on how to tap student Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-3

interests and digital media to fuel learning that is engaging, relevant, and socially connected. She is Director of the Connected Learning Lab, Professor in Residence and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University of California, Irvine, with appointments in the Department of Anthropology, the Department of Informatics, and the School of Education. She is also co-founder of Connected Camps, a non-profit that provides online creative learning in Minecraft for kids in all walks of life. She co-edited Personal, Portable, Pedestrian: Mobile Phones in Japanese Life and Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World, on mobile technologies and fandom in Japan. Her research on youth digital media engagement in the U.S. appears in her co-authored books Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Youth Living and Learning with New Media; Participatory Culture in a Networked Era; and Affinity Online: How Connection and Shared Interest Fuel Learning. She is the recipient of the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies from the American Educational Research Association. Ito earned an M.A. in anthropology and Ph.D. degrees in education and anthropology from Stanford University. LEAH H. JAMIESON is Ransburg Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, John A. Edwardson Dean Emerita of the College of Engineering, and holds a courtesy appointment in Purdue’s School of Engineering Education. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). She is co-founder and past director of the Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program. Awards include the NSF Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars, the NAE Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, and the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal. Jamieson served on steering committees for reports by the NAE and NRC, and has served as president and CEO of the IEEE, board chair of the Anita Borg Institute, and co- chair of the Computing Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research. She received a B.S. in mathematics from MIT and an M.A., M.S.E, and Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University. She has been awarded honorary doctorates by Drexel University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. ERIC KLOPFER is professor and director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. He is also a co-faculty director for MIT’s J-WEL World Education Lab. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The games that he works on are designed to build understanding of scientific practices and concepts as well as critical knowledge, using both mobile and web-delivered game platforms. He is the co-author of the books, Adventures in Modeling, The More We Know, and Resonant Games, and author of Augmented Learning. Klopfer was a member of the National Academies committee that produced the report on Learning Science Through Computer Games and Simulations. His lab has produced software (including the massively multiplayer online game The Radix Endeavor) and platforms (including StarLogo Nova and Taleblazer) used by millions of people, as well as online courses that have reached hundreds of thousands. He is also the co-founder and past president of the non-profit Learning Games Network. Klopfer earned a B.S. in biology from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-4

IRENE LEE is a research scientist at the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade. She is the founder and program director of Project GUTS: Growing Up Thinking Scientifically and Teachers with GUTS. The programs she develops enable participants to create computer models and use them to gain a scientific understanding of the world around them. Lee’s research focuses on students’ and teachers’ understanding of complex adaptive systems and their development of computational thinking skills. She served as the chair of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) Computational Thinking Task Force and as a lead writer of the K–12 Computer Science Frameworks and the CSTA K–12 Computer Science Standards (of 2011). Lee is currently serving as an advisor to the AI4K12 initiative and is guest editor of the Journal of Science Education and Technology's Special Issue on Computational Thinking from a Disciplinary Perspective. She is a past president of the Supercomputing Challenge and the Swarm Development Group, and previously was the director of the Learning Lab at Santa Fe Institute. Lee has a B.A. in pure mathematics from the University of Chicago and a M.Ed. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. VICTOR R. LEE is associate professor at Stanford University and was an associated professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University. His research explores learning through wearables and self-tracking technologies, Maker education in out-of- school settings, and unplugged and screen-free computer science education at the elementary school level. Prior research involved studying the use and design of science curriculum materials and conceptual change. Lee is past recipient of a National Academy of Education and Spencer Foundation Post-doctoral fellowship, the National Science Foundation’s CAREER award, and the Jan Hawkins Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association. He has published two academic volumes, Learning Technologies and the Body: Integration and Implementation in Formal and Informal Learning Environments and Reconceptualizing Libraries: Perspectives from the Information and Learning Sciences (with Abigail Phillips). He serves on several major journal editorial boards. He holds a Ph.D. in learning sciences from Northwestern University. REBECCA MAYNARD is professor emeritus of education and social policy at the University of Pennsylvania. A leading expert in the design and conduct of randomized controlled trials in the areas of education and social policy, she has advanced the application of research synthesis methods in education and social policy. She co-developed PowerUP to support efficient sample designs for causal inference studies, and designed and directed the University’s Predoctoral Training Program in Interdisciplinary Methods for Field-based Education Research. She also served as Commissioner of the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). She is a fellow of the American Education Research Association, an elected member of the Society for Research Synthesis Methodology. Awards include the Peter H. Rossi Award for Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation (2009) and the Society for Research on Adolescence Social Policy Best Book Award for Kids Having Kids (1998). She also is past president of both the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) and the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania faculty in 1993, she was Senior Vice President at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-5

DANIEL A. RABUZZI is founder and lead consultant at Indigo Pheasant, LLC. Prior to this, he served as the executive director of Mouse, and as senior director of Operations & Strategy at Year Up NY and National Program Director at The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship. He has been an evaluator for the Echoing Green fellowship and for Carnegie Corporation grants, a member of the advisory team for the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s Science Technology Engineering Arts & Math Center, and a member of the advisory team for the Urban Assembly Maker Academy in NYC, among other advisory roles. He is the 2005 silver award winner from the Society of National Association Publications for his cover story in the American Society of Association Executives journal. Rabuzzi earned a B.A. at Harvard University, an M.A. at The Fletcher School at Tufts, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins University. HEIDI SCHWEINGRUBER is the director of the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director or co-study director for a wide range of studies, including those on revising national standards for K–12 science education, learning and teaching science in grades K–8, and mathematics learning in early childhood. She also coauthored two award-winning books for practitioners that translate findings of the National Academies’ reports for a broader audience, on using research in K–8 science classrooms and on information science education. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. She also previously served on the faculty of Rice University and as the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project, an outreach program in K–12 mathematics education. She has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan. AMY STEPHENS (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Board on Science Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is also an adjunct professor for the Southern New Hampshire University Psychology Department, teaching graduate-level online courses in cognitive psychology and statistics. She has an extensive background in behavioral and functional neuroimaging techniques and has examined a variety of different populations spanning childhood through adulthood. She was the study director for the workshop on Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and recently released consensus reports English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives (2018) and Changing Expectations for the K–12 Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace (2020). She is also currently the study director for the study on Enhancing Science and Engineering in Prekindergarten through Fifth Grades. She holds a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from The Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Talented Youth and the university’s School of Education. MEGA SUBRAMANIAM is an associate professor and the Co-Director of the Youth Experience (YX) Lab at the College of Information Studies (known as the iSchool) at the University of Maryland. Subramaniam’s research focuses on enhancing the role of libraries in fostering the mastery of emerging digital literacies that are essential for STEM learning among underserved young people. Subramaniam is currently the lead PI for the IMLS-funded Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies in Youth Experience (YX), co-leads two other funded projects, ConnectedLib and Safe Data Safe Families, all intended to bring research and practice Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-6

together to enhance the pedagogical skills of in-service and pre-service youth librarians. She also currently serves as the fellow and chair of the Task Force for the Libraries Ready to Code initiative, spearheaded by the American Library Association. She is a recipient of the Library Journal's Movers and Shakers award. She currently serves as a board member for Young Adults Library Services Association (YALSA) and as a co-editor of the School Library Research Journal. Subramaniam received her master’s degree in instructional systems technology from Indiana University, Bloomington, and her Ph.D. in information studies from Florida State University. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs B-7

Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $55.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Computing in some form touches nearly every aspect of day to day life and is reflected in the ubiquitous use of cell phones, the expansion of automation into many industries, and the vast amounts of data that are routinely gathered about people's health, education, and buying habits. Computing is now a part of nearly every occupation, not only those in the technology industry. Given the ubiquity of computing in both personal and professional life, there are increasing calls for all learners to participate in learning experiences related to computing including more formal experiences offered in schools, opportunities in youth development programs and after-school clubs, or self-initiated hands-on experiences at home. At the same time, the lack of diversity in the computing workforce and in programs that engage learners in computing is well-documented.

It is important to consider how to increase access and design experiences for a wide range of learners. Authentic experiences in STEM - that is, experiences that reflect professional practice and also connect learners to real-world problems that they care about - are one possible approach for reaching a broader range of learners. These experiences can be designed for learners of all ages and implemented in a wide range of settings. However, the role they play in developing youths' interests, capacities, and productive learning identities for computing is unclear. There is a need to better understand the role of authentic STEM experiences in supporting the development of interests, competencies, and skills related to computing.

Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing examines the evidence on learning and teaching using authentic, open-ended pedagogical approaches and learning experiences for children and youth in grades K-12 in both formal and informal settings. This report gives particular attention to approaches and experiences that promote the success of children and youth from groups that are typically underrepresented in computing fields. Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing provides guidance for educators and facilitators, program designers, and other key stakeholders on how to support learners as they engage in authentic learning experiences.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!