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Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety (2020)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Emily A. Wang (Co-chair) is an associate professor in the Yale School of Medicine and directs the new SEICHE Center for Health and Justice. The SEICHE Center is a collaboration between the Yale School of Medicine and Yale Law School working to stimulate community transformation by identifying the legal, policy, and practice levers that can improve the health of individuals and communities impacted by mass incarceration. She leads the Health Justice Lab research program, which investigates how incarceration influences chronic health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and opioid use disorder, and uses a participatory approach to study interventions that mitigate the impacts of incarceration. As an internist, she has cared for thousands of individuals with a history of incarceration and is co-founder of the Transitions Clinic Network, a consortium of 40 community health centers nationwide dedicated to caring for individuals recently released from correctional facilities by employing community health workers with histories of incarceration. She has an M.D. from Duke University and an M.A.S. from the University of California, San Francisco.

Bruce Western (Co-chair) is the Bryce professor of sociology and social justice and co-director of the Justice Lab at Columbia University. His research has examined the causes, scope, and consequences of the historic growth in U.S. prison populations. Current projects include a randomized experiment assessing the effects of criminal justice fines and fees on misdemeanor defendants in Oklahoma City and a field study of solitary confinement in Pennsylvania state prisons. He is also the principal investigator of the Square One Project that aims to reimagine the public policy response to

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×

violence under conditions of poverty and racial inequality. He is the author of Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison and Punishment and Inequality in America. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been a Guggenheim fellow, a Russell Sage Foundation visiting scholar, and a fellow of the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study. He received a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Emily P. Backes (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on Law and Justice and the Board on Children, Youth, and Families in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In addition to her work on this study, she supports the Societal Experts Action Network, which links experts from the social and behavioral sciences to decision makers grappling with the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. In her nearly 10 years at the National Academies, she has directed studies and provided substantive analytical and editorial support to projects covering a range of topics, including adolescent development, financing early education, juvenile justice reform, policing, illicit markets, and science communication and literacy. She has an M.A. in history from the University of Missouri and a J.D. from the University of the District of Columbia.

Donald M. Berwick is cofounder, president emeritus, and senior fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. He also serves as lecturer in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. Previously, he held the presidentially appointed position of administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. A pediatrician by background, he has served as clinical professor of pediatrics and health care policy at the Harvard Medical School, professor of health policy and management at the Harvard School of Public Health, and as a member of the staff of Boston’s Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has also served as vice chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the first “independent member” of the board of trustees of the American Hospital Association, and chair of the National Advisory Council of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He is an elected member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Medicine. He has an M.D. and an M.P.P.

Sharon Dolovich is a professor of law at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), School of Law and director of the UCLA Prison Law & Policy Program. She teaches courses on criminal law, the constitutional law of prisons, and other post-conviction topics, and her scholarship focuses on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×

the law, policy, and theory of prisons and punishment. She has been a visiting professor at New York University, Harvard University, and Georgetown University and a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Previously, she served as deputy general counsel for the Los Angeles Citizens’ Commission on Jail Violence. She is coauthor of The New Criminal Justice Thinking. She has a Ph.D. from Cambridge University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Since the start of the pandemic, she has spearheaded the UCLA Law Covid-19 Behind Bars Data Project.

DeAnna Hoskins is president of JustLeadershipUSA. She was formerly the senior policy advisor for corrections and reentry with the Department of Justice (DOJ). In this capacity, she represented DOJ’s strategies and priorities and oversaw the Second Chance Act portfolio of grants, the National Reentry Resource Center, and residential substance abuse treatment programs. She had been designated as the interim deputy director of the Federal Reentry Interagency Council. She has experienced the reentry system from all perspectives as she is herself a previously incarcerated individual who has successfully transitioned back into the community, ultimately receiving a pardon. She holds an M.P.S. in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati, a B.A. in social work, a clinical license as an addictions counselor, and a certification as an offender workforce development specialist.

Margot Kushel is a professor of medicine at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she is the division chief and director of the Center for Vulnerable Populations and the director of the UCSF Benioff Homelessness and Housing Initiative. Her research focuses on reducing the burden of homelessness on health. She uses a variety of research methodologies with an aim toward informing the development of programs and policies to end homelessness through understanding the complex interactions between health and housing. She has a particular interest in homelessness in formerly incarcerated individuals, in older adults, and in medically complicated individuals. She maintains an active clinical practice as a general internist at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. She has an M.D. from the Yale School of Medicine and completed her residency and fellowship training at UCSF.

Hedwig Lee is a professor of sociology at Washington University, St. Louis. She holds a courtesy joint appointment at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and is a faculty affiliate in the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She is also an associate director of the university’s Center for Race, Ethnicity & Equity. She currently serves on the research advisory board for the Vera Institute of Justice and on the board for the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. Her

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×

recent work examines the impact of structurally rooted chronic stressors, such as mass incarceration, on health and health disparities. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina.

Steven Raphael is a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and holds the James D. Marver Chair at the university’s Goldman School of Public Policy. He is also the faculty director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment. His research focuses on the economics of low-wage labor markets, housing, and the economics of crime and corrections. His most recent research focuses on the social consequences of the large increases in U.S. incarceration rates and racial disparities in criminal justice outcomes. He also works on immigration policy, research questions pertaining to various aspects of racial inequality, the economics of labor unions, social insurance policies, homelessness, and low-income housing. Raphael is the author (with Michael Stoll) of Why Are so Many Americans in Prison? and The New Scarlet Letter? Negotiating the U.S. Labor Market with a Criminal Record. Raphael is research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the California Policy Lab, the University of Michigan National Poverty Center, the University of Chicago Crime Lab, IZA, Bonn Germany, and the Public Policy Institute of California. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Josiah “Jody” Rich is a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Brown University and a practicing infectious disease and addiction specialist providing care to patients at The Miriam Hospital and the Rhode Island Department of Corrections. He is the director and cofounder of The Center for Health and Justice Transformation at The Miriam Hospital and cofounder of the nationwide collaboration on HIV in corrections initiative through the Centers for AIDS Research. His primary areas of interest and expertise are in the overlap between infectious diseases and illicit substance use, the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, and the care and prevention of disease in addicted and incarcerated individuals. More recently he has focused on addressing the opioid overdose epidemic. He has served as an expert advisor to Rhode Island’s Overdose Prevention and Intervention Task Force since its inception. He has an M.D. from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Julie Schuck is a program officer at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has provided analytical, administrative, and editorial support for many studies and workshops and served as a technical writer for many reports. Her projects have covered a wide range

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×

of subjects, including law and justice issues, national security, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education, the science of human–system integration, workforce development, and the evaluations of several federal research programs. She has a B.S. in engineering physics from the University of California, San Diego, and an M.S. in education from Cornell University.

Dara Shefska is an associate program officer at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She supported the Committee on the Neurobiological and Socio-behavioral Science of Adolescent Development and Its Applications, the Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years, and the Committee on the Assessment of Health Outcomes by Birth Settings. Previously, she staffed the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions with the Food and Nutrition Board. In this role, she focused on publications, communications, and coordinating the Early Care and Education Innovation Collaborative. She was awarded the Health and Medicine Division’s Fineberg Impact Award for her efforts to increase the visibility of Roundtable workshops and publications. She is a graduate of McGill University and is currently pursuing a master’s degree at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy.

Stacey Smit is a senior program assistant at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, supporting consensus studies and forums for both the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Committee on Law and Justice. She has years of experience providing project management, administrative, and event planning support and has worked at various organizations in the area. Some of her previous studies include the Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security; the Committee on the Use of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families; the Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children; the Forum on Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health; and the Committee on Increasing Capacity for Reducing Bullying and Its Impact on the Lifecourse of Youth Involved. She received her B.A. in sociology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

John Wetzel is secretary of corrections for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. He previously held many positions in county corrections, including as warden at Franklin County Jail where he oversaw a 20 percent population reduction during his tenure. In his current role, he guides the department in restructuring community corrections, the mental health systems, and security enhancements while at the same time significantly reducing spending. He has served as chair and member of the Council of State

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×

Government’s Justice Center’s Executive Board. He is currently the president of the Correctional Leaders Association and a member of Harvard’s Executive Session on Community Corrections. He served as the corrections expert on the Chuck Colson task force—a congressionally created group tasked with assessing the Federal Bureau of Prisons. More recently, he was named to the congressionally created oversight committee to the federal First Step Act. He is a graduate of Bloomsburg University and recipient of honorary doctorate degrees from both Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Chestnut Hill College.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19: Advancing Health, Equity, and Safety. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25945.
×
Page 146
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The conditions and characteristics of correctional facilities - overcrowded with rapid population turnover, often in old and poorly ventilated structures, a spatially concentrated pattern of releases and admissions in low-income communities of color, and a health care system that is siloed from community public health - accelerates transmission of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) responsible for COVID-19. Such conditions increase the risk of coming into contact with the virus for incarcerated people, correctional staff, and their families and communities. Relative to the general public, moreover, incarcerated individuals have a higher prevalence of chronic health conditions such as asthma, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, making them susceptible to complications should they become infected. Indeed, cumulative COVID-19 case rates among incarcerated people and correctional staff have grown steadily higher than case rates in the general population.

Decarcerating Correctional Facilities during COVID-19 offers guidance on efforts to decarcerate, or reduce the incarcerated population, as a response to COIVD-19 pandemic. This report examines best practices for implementing decarceration as a response to the pandemic and the conditions that support safe and successful reentry of those decarcerated.

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