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The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity (2021)

Chapter: Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Data Collection and Information Sources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25982.
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Appendix B Data Collection and Information Sources The Committee on the Future of Nursing 2020–2030 was asked to chart a path forward for nursing to help reduce health disparities and produce a report providing recommendations on how nurses can improve the health of individuals, families, and communities by addressing the social determinants of health. The broad scope of this 2-year study included an examination of nursing education, practice, research, and policy with the purpose of promoting health equity. The committee was composed of 15 members with expertise and experi- ence in diverse areas, including nursing education and training, nursing prac- tice, health professions training and education, health policy, health economics, workforce policy, health care quality, health care delivery, hospital and health plan administration, public and community health, business administration, health informatics, health insurance systems, sociology, and health equity. The committee convened for five in-person meetings and participated in several conference calls throughout the study to deliberate on the content of this report and its recommendations. To provide a comprehensive response to the Statement of Task, the committee tapped the wide-ranging expertise of its members and reviewed data from a variety of sources, including recent literature, public and stakeholder input gathered through a series of town halls, site visits to a variety of health care settings where nurses work, and commissioned papers on selected topics. This appendix describes the inputs on which the committee relied to inform its deliberations and the approaches used to reach conclusions and craft recommendations. 391 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

392 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 INFORMATION COLLECTION AND PUBLIC INPUT The committee received data and input from multiple sources throughout the course of the study. To support the committee’s deliberations, a broad literature search for relevant published articles and reports, including grey literature, was conducted. For specific questions related to the charge that that required special- ized knowledge and expertise not available within its membership, the committee commissioned white papers, received support from AcademyHealth for data analyses, and heard presentations form other experts at town hall meetings. Literature Search A broad search for published literature was conducted using the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Embase, Medline, National Bureau of Economic Research, OECD, PubMed, and Scopus. These databases cover all the sources of published literature indexed by CINHAL and more. Search terms targeted nurs- ing workforce, leadership, clinical redesign, resilience, burnout, and technology and innovation broadly among the nursing field; the intersection of nursing and social determinants of health; programs and interventions to address health dis- parities, social needs, social determinants of health, and health equity broadly; and projections about the nursing field related to changing demographics and population needs and technological advancements. Publication dates were limited to 2009 to the present to reflect current policy, health care systems, and nursing education and workforce data since the prior The Future of Nursing report (IOM, 2011). Although the primary search was conducted in April 2019, staff conducted an updated search in February 2020, and additional publications and reports of relevance were added through June 2020. Grey literature was searched by hand for reports and data from multiple sources, including federal agencies, professional organizations, and scientific and health policy–focused organizations. Searches of federal agencies included the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the National Insti- tute of Nursing Research, the U.S. Department of Defense (Military Health System and Tricare), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. De- partment of Health and Human Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the U.S. Department of Labor, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Af- fairs. Professional organizations included the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and others. Institutions that regularly conduct scientific and health policy research, including RAND, AcademyHealth, The Commonwealth Fund, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and others were also reviewed for relevant information. The committee also relied on a collection of other National Academies re- ports in addition to the two prior nursing reports (IOM, 2011, 2016b). They are cited as appropriate throughout this report. They include PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 393 • Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century (IOM, 2001) • Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (IOM, 2003) • A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health (NASEM, 2016a) • Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity (NASEM, 2017) • Integrating Social Care into the Delivery of Health Care: Moving Up- stream to Improve the Nation’s Health (NASEM, 2019a) • Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Pro- fessional Well-Being (NASEM, 2019b) • Vibrant and Healthy Kids: Aligning Science, Practice, and Policy to Advance Health Equity (NASEM, 2019c) • Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults: Opportunities for the Health Care System (NASEM, 2020a) • Birth Settings in America: Outcomes, Quality, Access, and Choice (NASEM, 2020b) AcademyHealth To support the committee with timely data generation, analysis, synthesis, and dissemination, RWJF simultaneously contracted with AcademyHealth to support the committee with critical information not available in the current liter- ature. AcademyHealth created a research network from its membership of health policy and workforce researchers to respond to requests from the committee and anticipate needs throughout the study process. Research products generated by the AcademyHealth research network informed the committee’s deliberations and supported the committee’s conclusions. AcademyHealth selected five experts to serve as research managers to con- duct research and analyses. Their efforts were managed by AcademyHealth staff. All products generated by AcademyHealth in support of the committee are avail- able by request through the committee’s Public Access File. White Papers The committee commissioned two white papers to further their understand- ing and incorporate input from experts in other areas: • Brandt, B., A. J. Barton, C. J. Dieter, and S. D. Williams. 2019. Social determinants of health: Nursing, health professions and education at a crossroads. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Nursing 2020–2030. • Needleman, J. 2019. Paying for nursing care in fee-for-service and value-based systems. Paper commissioned by the Committee on the Future of Nursing 2020–2030. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

394 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 TOWN HALLS In conjunction with the site visits, the committee also participated in public town halls that included in-person expert and technical panels and testimony from organizations and individuals. These meetings1 were open to the public and were webcast live.2 The first town hall meeting, in Chicago, was held at Malcolm X Community College, and the theme was “Social Determinants of Health: Ed- ucation, Research, and Practice.” Experts, stakeholders, school administrators, community health nurses, and clinicians presented information on how nurse education is adapting to include new competencies, nurse engagement in research on health equity, and how nursing practice in the United States is currently in- corporating social determinants of health screening and targeted programs. The town hall in Philadelphia was held at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, and the theme was “Payment and Care for Complex Health and Social Needs.” The final town hall, in Seattle, was held at the School of Nursing at the University of Washington, and the theme was “High Tech to High Touch,” fo- cused on medical technology and its application in advancing health equity and well-being and preventing burnout of nurses. The town hall meetings were important sources of information from other experts on selected topics relevant to the committee’s task. They also served as important venues to solicit and receive public input. SITE VISITS Site visits were held in three cities in the United States between June and August 2019 and focused on current programs that involve nurses and address social determinants of health. The sites were chosen for their unique position in relationship to their communities and served as examples of successful models in deploying nurses and nurse leaders, identifying community and social needs, and implementing these models with measurable outcomes. Committee members were able to learn about the programs and observe how nurses worked to address the social needs and social determinants of health facing their clients. The first site visits took place in Chicago in June 2019 and included several programs sup- ported by Rush University. Some committee members were able to visit Thresh- old Community Mental Health Center, Sue Gin Health Center, and Simpson School Based Health Center. In July 2019, committee members met with leaders and staff at Stephen and Sandra Sheller 11th Street Family Health Services in Philadelphia and Camden Coalition and several of its community partners in Camden, New Jersey. The third set of site visits took place in and around Seattle in August 2019. Subgroups of committee members visited Downtown Emergency 1  Agendas for all town halls are at the end of this appendix. 2  Recordings of the town hall meetings are available online at https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25982. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 395 Services Center, Kline Galland, International Community Health Services, Seat- tle and King County Public Health, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Kitsap Connect at the Salvation Army in Kitsap, and the S’Klallum Reservation in Port Gamble. The site visits gave the committee members valuable context for how nurses are working with clients facing health-related social issues, the challenges of this work, and the impact that these nurses and programs have on their clients and communities. Because the committee members bring a variety of life and pro- fessional experiences, it was imperative for them all to observe nurses in action and working in settings to address social needs and social determinants of health. PUBLIC INPUT Throughout the duration of the study, the committee received testimony and comments from the public through several channels. At each open session and town hall meeting, the committee heard testimony from organizations and com- ments from individuals about the study. Any comments made by online viewers during those meetings were also made available to the committee. The National Academy of Medicine conducted Twitter chats in coordination with the town hall meetings and shared ideas put forward with the committee. Throughout the study process, the committee invited the public to share comments and support- ing materials with the committee by email. All public comments, in person and online, helped the committee understand the issues important to nurses, students, educators, leaders, and colleagues. OPEN MEETING AND TOWN HALL AGENDAS Below the agendas for each of the committee’s open meetings and town halls are listed chronologically. They include an introductory open meeting in Washington, DC; town hall meetings in Chicago, Philadelphia, and Seattle; and a second open meeting in Washington, DC. OPEN MEETING 1 Open Session Agenda March 20, 2019 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418 1:30 p.m. Welcome Study Sponsor and Introductory Remarks Sharyl Nass, Senior Board Director, Board on Health  Care Services, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine  Mary Wakefield and David Williams, Committee Co-Chairs PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

396 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 1:40 p.m. Remarks from the National Academy of Medicine Victor Dzau, President, National Academy of Medicine 1:50 p.m. Introduction to the Future of Nursing (2010) and Its Impact  Susan Hassmiller, Senior Scholar in Residence and Advisor to the President on Nursing, National Academy of Medicine 2:10 p.m. Introduction to the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action at the Center to Champion Nursing in America and Its Impact  Susan Reinhard, Senior Vice President and Director, AARP Public Policy Institute & Chief Strategist, Center to Champion Nursing in America 2:30 p.m. Charge to the Committee  Paul Kuehnert, Associate Vice-President- Program, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Open Q&A with the Committee 2:50 p.m. Invited comments (limited to 5 minutes each) •  Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, Acting Director and Scientific Director, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health •  Ann Cary, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, FNAP, Chair, Board for American Association of Colleges of Nursing •  Donna Meyer, MSN, RN, ANEF, FAADN, Chief Executive Offi- cer, Organization for Associate Degree Nursing •  Loressa Cole, DNP, MBA, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, Chief Executive Officer, American Nurses Association •  Linda H. Yoder, PhD, MBA, RN, AOCN, FAAN, Immediate Past President, Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses •  Susan V. Coleman, MPH, BSN, RN, Representing the Quad Council Coalition of Public Health Nursing Organizations •  Rumay Alexander, EdD, RN, FAAN, President, National G. League for Nursing 3:25 p.m. Public Comments  Comments will be limited to 2 minutes per person; select comments submitted by online viewers will be read. 4:00 p.m. Adjourn Open Session PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 397 Chicago Town Hall: Integrating Social Determinants of Health into Nursing Education, Research, and Practice June 7, 2019 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Malcom X Auditorium 8:30 a.m. Welcome •  Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, Senior Scholar in Sue Residence and Senior Advisor to the President on Nursing, National Academy of Medicine • Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Visiting Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University and The University of Texas at Austin 8:40 a.m. Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Nursing Education •  Pam McCue, PhD, RN, Chief Executive Officer, Rhode Island Nurses Institute Middle College •  Susan Swider, PhD, PHNA-BC, FAAN, Professor, Rush University •  Philip Dickison, PhD, Chief Officer of Operations and Examinations, National Council of State Boards of Nursing •  Moderated by Karen Cox, PhD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, President, Chamberlain University 9:35 a.m. Break 9:45 a.m. Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Nursing Research •  Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, Acting Director and Scientific Director, National Institute of Nursing Research •  Janice Phillips, PhD, RN, CENP, FAAN, Director of Nursing Research and Health Equity, Nursing Administration, Rush University Medical Center •  Robyn Golden, LCSW, Associate Vice President of Population Health and Aging, Rush University Medical Center •  Moderated by Elizabeth Aquino, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, DePaul University; President, National Association of Hispanic Nurses-Illinois Chapter PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

398 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 10:40 a.m. Integrating Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity into Nursing Practice •  Coletta C. Barrett, RN, FACHE, Vice President of Mission, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center •  Whitney Fear, RN, BSN, Case Manager/Outreach Nurse, Family HealthCare •  Teanya Norwood, MBA, MSN, RN, Social Determinants of Health Outcomes Manager, Promedica •  Moderated by Elizabeth Aquino, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, DePaul University; President, National Association of Hispanic Nurses-Illinois Chapter 11:35 a.m. Invited Comments (comments will be limited to 5 minutes) •  Mary Beth Kingston, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, President, American Organization for Nursing Leadership •  Patricia Kunz Howard, PhD, RN, CEN, CPEN, TCRN, NE-BC, FAEN, FAAN, President, Emergency Nurses Association •  Mark Pelletier, RN, MS, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nursing Officer, Joint Commission •  Kaye Englebrecht, Executive Director, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses 11:55 a.m. Public Comments (comments will be limited to 2 minutes) 12:25 p.m. Closing Remarks and Adjourn  Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Visiting Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University and The University of Texas at Austin Philadelphia Town Hall: Payment and Care for Complex Health and Social Needs July 24, 2019 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing 8:30 a.m. Welcome •  Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, Senior Scholar in Sue Residence and Senior Advisor to the President on Nursing, National Academy of Medicine • Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Visiting Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University and The University of Texas at Austin PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 399 8:40 a.m. Serving Populations with, and at Risk for, Complex Health and Social Needs: Introduction and Overview  Moderator: Antonia M. Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Margaret Bond Simon Dean, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing • Maternal Child Health, Nurse Family Partnership Erin Graham, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Nurse Supervisor, National Nurse-led Care Consortium • School Health Robin Cogan, MEd, RN, NCSN, School Nurse, Camden City School District (Yorkship Family School) • Rural Health Cheri Rinehart, RN, BSN, NHA, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pennsylvania Association of Community Health Centers • Aging  Alicia Georges, EdD, RN, FAAN, Chair, Department of C. Nursing, Lehman College; National Volunteer President, AARP 10:10 a.m. Break Paying for Care for Those With Complex Health and Social 10:20 a.m.  Needs: Introduction and Overview Moderator: Margaret Flinter, APRN, PhD, FAAN, c-FNP, Senior Vice President and Clinical Director, Community Health Center, Inc. • Federal Perspective on Payment Ellen-Marie Whelan, PhD, NP, RN, FAAN, Chief Population Health Officer, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services • State Perspective on Payment Carole Johnson, Commissioner, New Jersey Department of Human Services • Local/Regional Perspective on Payment Terrie P. Sterling, MSN, MBA, Executive Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center 11:35 a.m. Invited Comments (limited to 5 minutes each) •  Kristene Grayem, MSN, CNS, PPCNP-BC, RN-BC, President, American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing •  Elise Krikorian, Nursing Student, Pennsylvania State University; Chair, Population and Global Health, and Board Member, National Student Nurses Association PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

400 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 • Linda MacIntyre, PhD, RN, American Red Cross • Johnathan Holifield, JD, MEd, Executive Director, White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities 11:55 a.m. Public Comments (limited to 2 minutes each) 12:25 p.m. Closing Remarks and Adjourn Sue Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN Seattle Town Hall: High Tech to High Touch August 7, 2019 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the University of Washington, Kane Hall, Room 210 8:30 am Welcome •  Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, Senior Scholar in Residence Sue and Senior Advisor to the President on Nursing, National Academy of Medicine • Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, Visiting Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University and The University of Texas at Austin 8:40 a.m. Advancing Health Care Equity in the Digital Age  Moderator: Sue E. Birch, MBA, BSN, RN, Director, Washington State Health Care Authority • Molly Coye, MD, Executive-in-Residence, AVIA •  Kenya Beard, EdD, AGACNP-BC, NP-C, CNE ANEF, FAAN, Dean of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nassau Community College •  Molly McCarthy, MBA, BSN, RN-BC, Chief Nursing Officer, Microsoft 9:35 a.m. Break 9:45 a.m. Technology to Inform Practice and Advance Equity  Moderator: Sofia Aragon, JD, BSN, Executive Director, Washington Center for Nursing •  Sheila K. Shapiro, MBA, Senior Vice President-National Strategic Partnerships, UnitedHealthcare Clinical Services PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 401 •  Kern, MPH, BSN, Epidemiologist, Public Health Seattle Eli and King County • Stefan J. Torres, BSN, RN, CEN, Registered Nurse, Swedish Medical Center 10:40 a.m. Nurse Well-Being and Impact on Patients and Caregivers  Moderator: Kristen Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN, Dean and Professor, Seattle University College of Nursing •  Tim Cunningham, DrPH, MSN, RN, Corporate Director of Patient and Family Centered Care, Emory Healthcare •  Bernadette M. Melnyk, PhD, RN, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, Dean and Professor, College of Nursing, The Ohio State University •  Jason Wolf, PhD, CPXP, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Beryl Institute 11:35 a.m. Invited comments (limited to 5 minutes each) •  Susan Reinhard, RN, PhD, FAAN, Senior Vice President and Director, AARP Public Policy Institute; Chief Strategist, Center to Champion Nursing in America •  Karen Cox, PhD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, President, American Academy of Nursing •  Joyce Sensmeier, MS, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FHIMSS, FAAN, Vice President of Informatics, HIMSS •  Christina Dempsey, DNP, MSN, CNOR, CENP, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer, Press Ganey 11:55 a.m. Public Comments (limited to 2 minutes each) 12:25 p.m. Closing Remarks and Adjourn  Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, Senior Scholar in Residence and Sue Senior Advisor to the President on Nursing, National Academy of Medicine PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

402 THE FUTURE OF NURSING 2020–2030 OPEN MEETING 2 Open Session Agenda November 20, 2019 500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001 Open Session 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductory Remarks Mary Wakefield, Committee Co-Chair Moderated by Maureen Bisognano, Committee Member Technical Panel 9:05 a.m. Center for Health Care Strategies  Tricia McGinnis, Executive Vice President and Chief Program Officer 9:20 a.m. CVS Health  Angela Patterson, Chief Nurse Practitioner Officer, CVS MinuteClinic and Vice President, CVS Health 9:35 a.m. Pacific Business Group on Health  Elizabeth Mitchell, President and Chief Executive Officer (presentation by Zoom) 9:50 a.m. American Hospital Association • Priya Bathija, Vice President, The Value Initiative, American Hospital Association • Robyn Begley, American Hospital Association Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer, American Organization for Nursing Leadership 10:05 a.m. Q&A with the Committee Moderated by Maureen Bisognano, Committee Member 10:45 a.m. Closing Remarks Technical Panel Adjourns 10:50 a.m. Break PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX B 403 11:00 a.m. Future Trends  Lori Melichar, Senior Director, Program, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 11:55 a.m. Closing Remarks and Adjourn David Williams, Committee Co-Chair REFERENCES IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2001. Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. IOM. 2003. Unequal treatment: Confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. IOM. 2011. The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine). 2016a. A framework for educating health professionals to address the social determinants of health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2016b. Assessing progress on the Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2017. Communities in action: Pathways to health equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2019a. Integrating social care into the delivery of health care: Moving upstream to improve the nation’s health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2019b. Taking action against clinician burnout: A systems approach to professional well-be- ing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2019c. Vibrant and healthy kids: Aligning science, practice, and policy to advance health equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2020a. Social Isolation and loneliness in older adults: Opportunities for the health care system. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. NASEM. 2020b. Birth settings in America: Outcomes, quality, access, and choice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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The decade ahead will test the nation’s nearly 4 million nurses in new and complex ways. Nurses live and work at the intersection of health, education, and communities. Nurses work in a wide array of settings and practice at a range of professional levels. They are often the first and most frequent line of contact with people of all backgrounds and experiences seeking care and they represent the largest of the health care professions.

A nation cannot fully thrive until everyone - no matter who they are, where they live, or how much money they make - can live their healthiest possible life, and helping people live their healthiest life is and has always been the essential role of nurses. Nurses have a critical role to play in achieving the goal of health equity, but they need robust education, supportive work environments, and autonomy. Accordingly, at the request of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, on behalf of the National Academy of Medicine, an ad hoc committee under the auspices of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine conducted a study aimed at envisioning and charting a path forward for the nursing profession to help reduce inequities in people's ability to achieve their full health potential. The ultimate goal is the achievement of health equity in the United States built on strengthened nursing capacity and expertise. By leveraging these attributes, nursing will help to create and contribute comprehensively to equitable public health and health care systems that are designed to work for everyone.

The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity explores how nurses can work to reduce health disparities and promote equity, while keeping costs at bay, utilizing technology, and maintaining patient and family-focused care into 2030. This work builds on the foundation set out by The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health (2011) report.

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