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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
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Appendix

Agenda

Workshop on Family Planning, Women’s Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts

September 24–25, 2020

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24

10:00–10:10 am EDT
Welcome and goals for the workshop

Malay Majmundar, Director, Committee on Population

Ann Blanc, Steering Committee Chair, Population Council

10:10–10:20 am EDT
Background on the workshop

Win Brown, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

10:20–11:30 am EDT
The role of fertility decline and women’s empowerment in economic development and in other population and societal changes
Moderator: Amy Tsui, Johns Hopkins University (emerita)
This session will focus on questions such as:
  • What is the link between fertility change and economic development, especially at the macro level?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
  • What is the role of women’s empowerment as an intervening variable?
  • What do we know about the relationship between changes in the role of and status of women in developing countries, and economic growth?
  • Has access to family planning mattered?

Jocelyn Finlay, Harvard University

Naila Kabeer, London School of Economics

Seema Jayachandran, Northwestern University

11:30–11:45 am EDT
Break
11:45 am–1:15 pm EDT
Measuring women’s empowerment
Moderator: Mayra Buvinic, United Nations Foundation
This session will focus on questions such as:
  • What are the ways in which women’s empowerment is measured and operationalized?
    • At what level is empowerment measured?
    • Proxies for measuring women’s agency

Ushma Upadhyay, University of California, San Francisco

Sonalde Desai, University of Maryland

Kathryn Yount, Emory University

Aletheia Donald, Africa Gender Innovation Lab, World Bank

1:15–2:10 pm EDT
Break
2:10–3:20 pm EDT
Ways of addressing current data limitations
Moderator: Nancy Birdsall, Center for Global Development
This session will focus on questions such as:
  • What are the key data sources for studying the relationship between contraceptive use, fertility, and women’s empowerment?
  • What are the key data limitations, and how might they be addressed?
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×

Philip Anglewicz, Johns Hopkins University

Anita Raj, University of California, San Diego

Sunita Kishor, ICF

3:20–3:30 pm EDT
Wrap-up day 1 and plans for day 2

Ann Blanc, Steering Committee Chair, Population Council

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

10:00–11:20 am EDT
Family planning, fertility, and women’s empowerment in low- and middle-income countries
Moderator: Alex Ezeh, Drexel University
This session will focus on the extent to which the nexus between family planning, fertility, and women’s empowerment varies within and across low- and middle-income countries.

Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, Rutgers University

Yohannes Wado, African Population and Health Research Center, Nairobi, Kenya

Zeba Sathar, Population Council, Islamabad, Pakistan

Ndola Prata, University of California, Berkeley

11:20–11:30 am EDT
Break
11:30 am–12:30 pm EDT
Mechanisms of attitude change
Moderator: Jocelyn Finlay, Harvard University
This session will focus on questions such as:
  • What are the mechanisms by which changes in attitudes toward and opportunities for girls and women affect changes in attitudes toward and use of contraceptives (and vice versa)?
  • What are the noneconomic benefits of changing social norms?
  • What have we learned from recent experimental research?

Sajeda Amin, Population Council

Sarah Baird, George Washington University

Rajiv Rimal, Johns Hopkins University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
12:30–1:00 pm EDT
Break
1:00–2:10 pm EDT
Foundation and agency programs and priorities
Moderator: Sunita Kishor, ICF

Althea Anderson, Hewlett Foundation

Benoit Kalasa, United Nations Population Fund

Tamara Kreinin, Packard Foundation

Afeefa Abdur-Rahman, Office of Population and Reproductive Health, USAID (Contractor)

Ann Starrs, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

2:10–3:30 pm EDT
Summary of key themes and next steps to move the field forward

Amy Tsui, Johns Hopkins University (emerita)

Sunita Kishor, ICF

Jocelyn Finlay, Harvard University

Alex Ezeh, Drexel University

Mayra Buvinic, United Nations Foundation

Nancy Birdsall, Center for Global Development

Ann Blanc, Steering Committee Chair, Population Council

3:30 pm EDT
Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26023.
×
Page 88
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Over the past several decades, fertility rates have fallen substantially in low- and middle-income countries, and efforts to limit fertility, primarily through the implementation of family planning programs, have become increasingly widespread. Although there is a substantial scholarly literature on the determinants of contraceptive use and other measures to limit fertility and on the resulting differentials in fertility, relatively little is known about the role played by women's empowerment as both a determinant and a consequence of fertility decline. In addition, there continues to be little consensus about the link between fertility decline and broader societal impacts, including economic development.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop, "Family Planning, Women's Empowerment, and Population and Societal Impacts," in September 2020. This event brought together experts and stakeholders to discuss conceptual, methodological, and policy issues regarding the relationships among family planning, women's empowerment, fertility decline, and population and societal impacts. The discussion was intended to inform research and policy focused on the issues of women's roles and empowerment and on longstanding questions surrounding the determinants and consequences of fertility reduction behavior. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

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