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Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward (2021)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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APPENDIX C

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Eric B. Larson, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is a senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, the former vice president for research and health care innovation for Kaiser Permanente Washington, and the executive director of the Institute. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Larson trained in internal medicine at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, completed a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars and M.P.H. at the University of Washington (UW), and then served as the chief resident of University Hospital in Seattle. He served as the medical director of the UW Medical Center and the associate dean for clinical affairs from 1989 to 2002 and remains a clinical professor of medicine and health services at UW. His research spans a range of general medicine topics and has focused on aging and dementia, including a long-running study of aging and cognitive change set in Kaiser Permanente Washington, formerly Group Health Cooperative—The UW/Group Health Alzheimer’s Disease Patient Registry/Adult Changes in Thought Study. Dr. Larson has served as the president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, the chair of the Office of Technology Assessment/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Panel on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders, and was the chair of the board of regents (2004–2005) of the American College of Physicians. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Marilyn Albert, Ph.D., is the director of the Division of Cognitive Neuroscience, a professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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of Medicine, and the director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. She received her Ph.D. in physiological psychology from McGill University in Montreal and completed a fellowship in neuropsychology at the Boston University School of Medicine. She served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School from 1981 to 2003. She moved to Johns Hopkins in 2003. Dr. Albert focuses on the cognitive and brain changes associated with aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Her work has delineated the cognitive changes associated with aging and early AD. She has also identified lifestyle factors that promote maintenance of mental abilities with advancing age. Dr. Albert’s research currently focuses on the early identification of AD and potential ways of monitoring the progression of disease to permit early intervention.

María P. Aranda, Ph.D., M.S.W., M.P.A., is an associate professor at the University of Southern California (USC) Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and the executive director of the USC Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging. She leads the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement Core of the USC Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. Dr. Aranda’s research, teaching, and practice interests address the study of psychosocial care of adult and late-life psychiatric and neurocognitive disorders, including depression and Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. She examines racial and ethnic diversity in the delivery of health and mental health services, disparities in health and health care, and testing of psychosocial interventions to alleviate illness burden among persons living with medical and psychiatric illnesses and their family care partners. Dr. Aranda has served as the principal investigator or the co-investigator on several key studies funded by and/or in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Cancer Institute, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, the State of California Alzheimer’s Disease Program, The John A. Hartford Foundation/Gerontological Society of America, the California Community Foundation, the National Institute of Rehabilitation and Research, the Alzheimer’s Association/Health Resources and Services Administration, the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, and the Larson Endowment for Innovative Research.

She co-pioneered a state-of-the-art family support program (“El Portal”) for low-income, Spanish-speaking families dealing with neurodegenerative disorders, which is a national model for family caregiving in hard-to-reach communities. Dr. Aranda has served on several consensus study committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including on the geriatric workforce in mental health and substance use service sectors, family caregiving to older adults with functional limitations, and financial capacity determination among Social Security beneficiaries.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Christopher M. Callahan, M.D., MACP, is a professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He also serves as the chief research and development officer at Eskenazi Health, one of the nation’s largest safety net health systems. He is an active research scientist in the Indiana University Center for Aging Research at the Regenstrief Institute. His research seeks to improve outcomes for older adults with late-life depression and dementia, focused on innovative models of care that support generalist physicians in their day-to-day provision of health to older adults. Dr. Callahan has spent more than two decades developing and exploring new treatment models for older adults and was recognized in 2016 with the Edward Henderson Award from the American Geriatrics Society. He continues to provide care for older adults in the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation. Dr. Callahan attended the St. Louis University School of Medicine, completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine, and fellowship at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

Eileen M. Crimmins, Ph.D., is the AARP professor of gerontology in the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California (USC). She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is currently the director of the USC/University of California, Los Angeles, Center on Biodemography and Population Health, one of the Demography of Aging Centers supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). She is also the director of the Multidisciplinary Training in Gerontology Program and the NIA-sponsored Network on Biological Risk. Dr. Crimmins is a co-investigator of the Health and Retirement Study in the United States. Much of Dr. Crimmins’s research has focused on changes over time in health and mortality. Dr. Crimmins has been instrumental in organizing and promoting the recent integration of the measurement of biological indicators in large population surveys. She served as the co-chair of a committee for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to address why life expectancy in the United States is falling so far behind that of other countries. She has also co-edited several books with a focus on international aging, mortality, and health expectancy: Determining Health Expectancies; Longer Life and Healthy Aging; Human Longevity, Individual Life Duration, and the Growth of the Oldest-Old Population; International Handbook of Adult Mortality; Explaining Diverging Levels of Longevity in High-Income Countries; and International Differences in Mortality at Older Ages: Dimensions and Sources. She has received the Kleemeier Award for Research from the Gerontological Society of America.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Ph.D., is a professor of health policy and management at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Her research focus is on health disparities and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an emphasis on building knowledge for the scientific and lay communities to inform conducting culturally relevant research and disseminating information about AD and related disorders in medically underserved diverse populations. In recognition of her research in aging, Dr. Dilworth-Anderson received the Pearmain Prize for Excellence in Research on Aging from the University of Southern California (USC) Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging. UNC awarded her the University Diversity Award in recognition of her commitment to diversity and inclusion in research, teaching, and leadership. She received the Ronald and Nancy Reagan Alzheimer’s Research Award for her research contributions on AD in medically underserved populations from the Alzheimer’s Association. Dr. Dilworth-Anderson has served in numerous leadership roles, some of which include the president of the Gerontological Society of America; a member of the Global Council on Brain Health, committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; the National Alzheimer’s Association Medical and Scientific Council; the Board of Directors of the National Alzheimer’s Association and Eastern North Carolina Chapter; the National Research Advisory Council of the Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health.

XinQi Dong, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers University as well as the inaugural Henry Rutgers professor of population health sciences. Dr. Dong has published extensively on the topics of violence prevention in global populations with more than 260 peer-reviewed publications and is leading a longitudinal epidemiological study (The PINE Study) of 3,300 Chinese older adults to quantify relationships among culture, violence, and health outcomes. Dr. Dong is the principal investigator of eight federally funded grants and also has mentored many trainees and faculties to success. He is the principal investigator of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research. Dr. Dong served on many editorial boards, was the guest editor-in-chief for the Journal of Aging Health and the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, and edited the key textbook on elder abuse—the field’s largest collection of research, practice, and policy.

Dr. Dong was the recipient of the Paul Beeson Award by NIA, the National Physician Advocacy Merit Award by the Institute for Medicine as a Profession, the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award by the American Public Health Association (APHA), the National Award for Excellence by APHA, the Maxwell Pollack Award

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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in Productive Aging, the Joseph Freeman Award, and the Powell Lawton Award by the Gerontological Society of America. He was also awarded the Rosalie Wolf Award by the National Committee on the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the Outstanding Scientific Achievement for Clinical Investigation Award by the American Geriatric Society. Dr. Dong was elected to be a commissioner for the Commission on Law and Aging of the American Bar Association. In 2017, Dr. Dong received the Eward Busse Award by the International Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics.

Dr. Dong has been a strong advocate for advancing population health issues in underrepresented communities across the local, national, and international levels. Internationally, Dr. Dong has worked with multiple institutions in China as well as the Chinese National Committee on Aging to further dialogue between the United States and China collaborative on elder justice and mental health. Dr. Dong served as a senior advisor for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Obama administration. His policy and advocacy work with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have also shaped the national agenda on the surveillance and preventive strategies combating the issues of violence prevention. In 2011, Dr. Dong was appointed as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention. Subsequently, he chaired the workshop on elder abuse prevention. In 2017, Dr. Dong was invited to be the planning committee member for the Board on Global Health to chart the future of violence prevention effort at the National Academies. In 2018, Dr. Dong was elected to the American Society of Clinical Investigation and was awarded the Health Equity Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

An immigrant to the United States, Dr. Dong grew up in a rural village near Nanjing, China. He received his B.A. in biology and economics from the University of Chicago, his M.D. at Rush University College of Medicine, and his M.P.H. in epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He completed his internal medicine residency and geriatric fellowship at the Yale University Medical Center.

Miguel Hernán, M.D., Dr.P.H., conducts research to learn what works to improve human health. Together with his collaborators, he designs analyses of health care databases, epidemiologic studies, and randomized trials. Dr. Hernán teaches clinical data science at the Harvard Medical School; clinical epidemiology at the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology; and causal inference methodology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he is the Kolokotrones professor of biostatistics and epidemiology. His edX course Causal Diagrams and his book Causal Inference, co-authored with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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James Robins, are freely available online and widely used for the training of researchers. Dr. Hernán is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Statistical Association; an editor of Epidemiology; and the past or current associate editor of Biometrics, the American Journal of Epidemiology, and the Journal of the American Statistical Association.

Ronald Hickman, Jr., Ph.D., RN, ACNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN, is the Ruth M. Anderson Endowed professor and the associate dean for research at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Hickman’s research integrates knowledge from several disciplinary domains to understand psychosocial and biological mechanisms that influence how persons with cognitive impairment and their family caregivers make health-related decisions and provide technology-based decision support.

Helen Hovdesven, M.A., holds an M.A. in health advocacy from Sarah Lawrence College. Prior to retiring, Ms. Hovdesven was a patient representative and acting director of patient relations at a tertiary care facility. She was involved with direct patient care, helping patients and their families navigate the health care system, ensuring their medical and health care needs and collaborating with other health care providers to mediate conflicts and facilitate change. She was also an HIV counselor, organ donor requestor, and volunteer trainer and coordinator for Reach to Recovery. Ms. Hovdesven also served on the Ethics Committee and Child Protection Services Committee. Ms. Hovdesven is currently the co-chair of the Patient Family Advisory Council (PFAC) at the Johns Hopkins Memory and Alzheimer’s Treatment Center, and has been involved with PFAC since its launch in 2008 and served as the chair for more than 7 years. She is also involved with the Johns Hopkins Brain Autopsy Program and has been an advisory board member of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences since 2003. Ms. Hovdesven is dedicated to Alzheimer’s research, including the needs of caregivers, having been a caregiver for her late husband, Arne. She has also completed a series of podcasts for Johns Hopkins, “Alzheimer’s from Diagnosis to Death” and “Brain Autopsy,” sharing their personal story.

Rebecca A. Hubbard, Ph.D., is an associate professor of biostatistics in the Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Hubbard’s research focuses on the development and application of statistical methodology for observational studies using real-world data, including electronic health records and administrative claims. This work encompasses the evaluation of screening and diagnostic test performance, methods for comparative

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
×

effectiveness studies, and health services research. Dr. Hubbard’s methodological research has been applied to studies of cancer epidemiology, aging and dementia, pharmacoepidemiology, women’s health, and behavioral health. Dr. Hubbard received a B.S. (ecology and evolution, summa cum laude) from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.Sc. (epidemiology) from the University of Edinburgh, an M.Sc. (applied statistics, with Honors) from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. (biostatistics) from the University of Washington.

Jason Karlawish, M.D., is a professor of medicine, medical ethics, health policy, and neurology at the University of Pennsylvania and cares for patients at the Penn Memory Center, which he co-directs. His research focuses on issues at the intersections of bioethics, aging, and the neurosciences. He leads the Penn Program for Precision Medicine for the Brain (P3MB). P3MB developed standards for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) bio-marker disclosure and investigates the clinical impacts of this knowledge on persons with AD and their families. He has investigated the development and translation of AD treatments and biomarker-based diagnostics, informed consent, quality of life, research and treatment decision making, and voting by persons with cognitive impairment and residents of long-term care facilities. Dr. Karlawish has disseminated his research in leading textbooks of medicine and bioethics, testimony to the Senate Select Committee on Aging, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Subcommittee on the Inclusion of Individuals with Impaired Decision-making in Research, and collaborations with the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study, the Alzheimer’s Association, the American Bar Association’s Commission on Law and Aging, AARP’s Global Council on Brain Health, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the National Academy of Medicine (he served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s committee to address the public health challenges of cognitive aging), the State of Vermont, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, and the U.S. Government Accountability Office. He is an international proponent of mobile polling, a method of bringing the vote to long-term care facilities that minimizes fraud and maximizes voter rights. In a widely publicized essay in the Journal of the American Medical Association, he introduced the concept of “desktop medicine,” a theory of medicine that recognizes how risk and its numerical representations are transforming medicine, medical care, and health. He studied medicine at Northwestern University and trained in internal medicine and geriatric medicine at the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Chicago.

Robyn I. Stone, Dr.P.H., is the senior vice president for research at LeadingAge and the co-director of the LeadingAge LTSS Center @UMass

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
×

Boston. She is a noted researcher and an internationally recognized authority on long-term care and aging policy and has held senior research and policy development, program evaluation, large-scale demonstrations and other applied research activities in those areas for more than 40 years. Dr. Stone has held senior research and policy positions in both the federal government and the private sector, including serving in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as deputy assistant secretary for disability, aging, and long-term care policy and as the assistant secretary for aging in the Clinton administration. Her work bridges the worlds of research, policy, and practice to improve the care delivered to older adults—particularly lower-income populations—and to ensure the best quality of life for these individuals and their families. Dr. Stone is a distinguished speaker and has been published widely in the areas of long-term care policy and quality, chronic care for older adults and people with disabilities, aging services workforce development, the link between low-income senior housing and health, and family caregiving. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the National Academy of Social Insurance and was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2014. She serves on numerous provider and nonprofit boards that focus on aging issues.

Jennifer L. Wolff, Ph.D., is the Eugene and Mildred Lipitz professor and the director of the Roger C. Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care. She is an expert and thought leader in research and policy relating to the care of persons with complex health needs and disabilities. She has made major contributions to increasing understanding of the role of family caregivers in the interactions of older adults with the medical community. She has been involved in the development and evaluation of numerous initiatives aimed at better supporting older adults and their family caregivers, including applied research to develop practical tools and strategies that may be readily deployed in care delivery. Her research has been published in a wide range of journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Social Science and Medicine, and Health Affairs. She has led projects that have been funded by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Mental Health, AARP, the Jacob and Valeria Langeloth Foundation, the Milbank Memorial Fund, and Atlantic Philanthropies. Dr. Wolff directs the Roger C. Lipitz Center for Integrated Health Care and is a core member of the Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research, the Center on Aging and Health, and the Center on Innovative Care in Aging. She holds a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
×

STAFF

Clare Stroud, Ph.D. (Study Director), is a senior program officer with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In this capacity, she serves as the director for the Committee on Care Interventions for Individuals with Dementia and Their Caregivers. She also serves as the director of the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, which brings together leaders from government, academia, industry, and nonprofit organizations to discuss key challenges and emerging issues in neuroscience research, development of therapies for nervous system disorders, and related ethical and societal issues. She recently served as the director of the consensus study report Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Way Forward and as the senior program officer for the consensus study report Medications for Opioid Use Disorder Save Lives. Dr. Stroud first joined the National Academies in 2009 as a science and technology policy graduate fellow. She has also been an associate at AmericaSpeaks, a nonprofit organization that engages citizens in decision making on important public policy issues. Dr. Stroud received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, College Park, with research focused on the cognitive neuroscience of language. She received her bachelor’s degree from Queen’s University in Canada.

Autumn S. Downey, Ph.D., is a senior program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2012 and is currently directing a consensus study on respiratory protection as well as a standing committee on the health risks of air pollution exposure for U.S. Department of State employees and their families stationed overseas. Other National Academies studies she has worked on include Evidence-Based Practice for Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response; Return of Individual-Specific Research Results Generated in Research Laboratories; Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia; A National Trauma Care System; Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters; BioWatch PCR Assays; and Advancing Workforce Health at the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Downey received her Ph.D. in molecular microbiology and immunology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the school’s National Center for the Study of Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where she worked on environmental sampling for biothreat agents and the indoor microbiome.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
×

Sheena M. Posey Norris, M.S., is a program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Health and Medicine Division. Her primary interest is in policy issues related to translational and behavioral neuroscience research, neuropsychology, and global mental health. She currently works with the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, previously serving as an associate program officer and a research associate, and worked on the consensus study report Care Interventions for Individuals Living with Dementia and Their Caregivers. Ms. Posey Norris has led and assisted in the planning of activities for the Neuroscience Forum, Preventing Dementia and Cognitive Impairment study, Ethical Review and Oversight Issues in Research Involving Standard of Care Interventions workshop, Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies, Guidance for Standards of Care During Disaster Situations study, and Strategies for Cost-Effective and Flexible Biodetection Systems That Ensure Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials workshop. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Posey Norris was a research associate in the Graduate School of Nursing at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. Working alongside advanced practice nurse researchers, she conducted research focusing on health-promoting behaviors of military spouses. Ms. Posey Norris received her M.S. from Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in experimental psychology with an emphasis in neuropsychology. Her thesis-driven research during her graduate studies focused on the neurocognitive and balance effects of multiple concussions in young adults. Ms. Posey Norris graduated magna cum laude from Lynchburg College in Virginia with a bachelor of science in psychology and Spanish (high honors).

Andrew March, M.P.H., is a research associate for the Health and Medicine Division’s Board on Health Sciences Policy (HSP), having joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2018. His previous work at the National Academies includes two consensus studies on the safety and effectiveness of compounded drug preparations. Prior to coming to HSP, he performed research on sickness absence in working women at the Center for Research in Occupational Health, and he worked in the epidemiology department at the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau in Barcelona. Mr. March obtained a B.S. in biology and Spanish from Roanoke College and an M.P.H. at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona.

Andrew M. Pope, Ph.D., is the senior director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy. He has a Ph.D. in physiology and biochemistry from the University of Maryland and has been a member of the National Academies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine since 1982, and of the Health and Medicine Division staff since 1989. His primary interests are science policy, biomedical ethics, and environmental and occupational influences on human health. During his tenure at the National Academies, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers to the protection of human subjects of research, National Institutes of Health priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Since 1998, Dr. Pope has served as the director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy, which oversees and guides a program of activities that is intended to encourage and sustain the continuous vigor of the basic biomedical and clinical research enterprises needed to ensure and improve the health and resilience of the public. Ongoing activities include Forums on Neuroscience, Genomics, Drug Discovery and Development, and Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the Health and Medicine Division’s Cecil Award and the National Academy of Sciences President’s Special Achievement Award.

Sharyl Nass, Ph.D., serves as the senior director of the Board on Health Care Services and the director of the National Cancer Policy Forum at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. To enable the best possible care for all patients, the board undertakes scholarly analysis of the organization, financing, effectiveness, workforce, and delivery of health care, with emphasis on quality, cost, and accessibility. The National Cancer Policy Forum examines policy issues pertaining to the entire continuum of cancer research and care. For more than two decades, Dr. Nass has worked on a broad range of health and science policy topics that include the quality and safety of health care and clinical trials, developing technologies for precision medicine, and strategies for large-scale biomedical science. She has a Ph.D. in cell biology from Georgetown University and undertook postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as a research fellowship at the Max Planck Institute in Germany. She also holds a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has been the recipient of the Cecil Medal for Excellence in Health Policy Research, a Distinguished Service Award from the National Academies, the Mentor Award from the Health and Medicine Division, and the Institute of Medicine Staff Team Achievement Award (as team leader).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26026.
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Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward Get This Book
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Millions of people are living with dementia in the United States and globally. To live well with dementia, people need care, services, and supports that reflect their values and preferences, build on their strengths and abilities, promote well-being, and address needs that evolve as cognitive impairment deepens.

Persons living with dementia co-manage their care with or rely on the support of a wide range of care partners and caregivers, including spouses, other family members and friends, and direct care workers in homes or residential care settings. While dementia care has improved since the 1970s, many individuals still lack access to high-quality care and are not living as well as they might. Disadvantaged groups, especially racial and ethnic minorities, still face challenges in access to care, services, and supports, due to deep and persistent inequities.

Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward examines the complex body of evidence on dementia care and informs decision making about which interventions are ready to be broadly disseminated and implemented. It also offers a blueprint to guide future research using rigorous, cutting-edge methods that are inclusive, equitable, and yield critical information for real-world implementation, toward the ultimate goal of better supporting persons living with dementia and their care partners and caregivers in living as well as possible.

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