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Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guide for Quantitative Approaches to Systemic Safety Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26032.
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Page 91
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Guide for Quantitative Approaches to Systemic Safety Analysis. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26032.
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Page 92

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91 Bibliography American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). Highway Safety Manual, 2010. American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). AASHTOWare Safety Analyst Data Management Tool Manual, 2016. Atkinson, J.E., B.E. Chandler, V. Betkey, K. Weiss, K. Dixon, A. Giragosian, K. Donoughe, and C. O’Donnell. Manual for Selecting Safety Improvements on High Risk Rural Roads. Report No. FHWA-SA-14-075. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2014. Brunell, D. “Maine’s Systemic Approach—Updated.” Presented 2016, Maine Department of Transportation, 2016. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 23—Highways, Part 924, Highway Safety Improvement Program, 23 CFR § 924.11(b): Implementation, 2017. Federal Highway Administration (FWHA). “Crash Modification Factors Clearinghouse.” http://www. cmfclearinghouse.org/. Accessed September 2019A. Federal Highway Administration (FWHA). “DDSA Crash Tree Diagram.” https://ruralsafetycenter.org/resources/ list/ddsa-crash-tree-diagram/. Accessed November 2019B. Federal Highway Administration (FWHA). “Roadway Safety Data Program.” https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/rsdp/ about.aspx. Accessed September 2019C. Federal Highway Administration (FWHA). Thurston County, Washington, Public Works Department Applies Systemic Safety Project Selection Tool. Report No. FHWA-SA-13-026. 2013. Geedipally, S. Systemic Approach to Pedestrian Safety Improvement Technical Memorandum. TxDOT Project 58-7XXIA001—Task C. Texas Department of Transportation, 2017. Green, E.R., and M.A. Fields. A Methodology to Prioritize the Locations of Cable Barrier Installations in Kentucky. University of Kentucky, 2015. Gross, F., T. Harmon, G. Bahar, and K. Peach. Reliability of Safety Management Methods: Systemic Safety Programs. Report No. FHWA-SA-16-041. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2016. Hanscom, E. A Systemic Approach to Lane Departure Crashes in Maine. Maine Department of Transportation, 2018. Harwood, D. W., D. J. Torbic, K. R. Richard, and M. M. Meyer. Safety Analyst: Software Tools for Safety Management of Specific Highway Sites. Report No. FHWA-HRT-10-063. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2010. Herbel, S., L. Laing, and C. McGovern. Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Manual. Report No. FHWA-SA-00-029. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2010. Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT). Development of Crash Modification Factors for Rumble Strip Treatments on Rural Two-lane Roads. Technical Memorandum Prepared by Jacobs, 2018. Kolody, K., and M. Rajabi. “Prioritization, Implementation and Evaluation of Shoulder Rumble Strip Treat- ments on Rural Two-lane Roads.” Poster Session at AASHTO Committee on Safety, Chicago, Illinois, May 8, 2018. Lefler, N., Y. Zhou, D. Carter, H. McGee, D. Harkey, and F. Council. Model Inventory of Roadway Elements— MIRE 2.0. Report No. FHWA-SA-17-048. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transpor- tation, 2017. Milton, J.C., D. Emidy, D. Duncan, J. Roche, S. Sturtz, M. Vaughn, and D.J. Torbic. Leading Practices in the Use of the Highway Safety Manual for Planning, Design, and Operations. NCHRP Project 20-68A, Scan 16-01. Scan Team Report, Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C., 2018. Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT). 2019 Minnesota County Roadway Safety Plan. 2019. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). MMUCC Guideline: Model Minimum Uniform Crash Criteria, 5th ed. 2017.

92 Guide for Quantitative Approaches to Systemic Safety Analysis Porter, R., T. Le, F. Gross, D. Carter, T. Saleem, and R. Srinivasan. Contributing Factors for Focus Crash Types and Facility Types: Quick Reference Guide. Report No. FHWA-HRT-20-053. Federal Highway Administra- tion, U.S. Department of Transportation, Forthcoming. Preston, H., R. Storm, J. D. Bennett, and B. Wemple. Systemic Safety Project Selection Tool. Report No. FHWA- SA-13-019. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2013. Quintus, H.V. and A. Mergenmeier. Case Study: Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s High Friction Surface Treatment and Field Installation Program. Report No. FHWA-SA-15-038. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2015. Richard, C. M., K. Magee, P. Bacon-Abdelmoteleb, and J. L. Brown. Countermeasures That Work: A Highway Safety Countermeasure Guide For State Highway Safety Offices, Ninth Edition, 2017. Report No. DOT HS 812 478. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2018. Scurry, K. and H. Preston. Systemic Safety Project Selection Tool. Presented May 2013, http://www.pedbikeinfo. org/pdf/Webinar_PSAP_052813.pdf. Accessed September 2019. Srinivasan, R., D. Carter, and K. Bauer. Safety Performance Function Decision Guide: SPF Calibration vs SPF Development. Report No. FHWA-SA-14-004. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2013. Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). Texas Intersection Safety Implementation Plan—Preliminary Findings for Texas’s Alamo Area Metropolitan Planning Organization. 2016. Thomas, L., L. Sandt, C. Zegeer, W. Kumfer, K. Lang, B. Lan, Z. Horowitz, A. Butsick, J. Toole, and R. J. Schneider. NCHRP Research Report 893: Systemic Pedestrian Safety Analysis. Transportation Research Board, 2018. Transportation Research Board (TRB). (2003–2009). NCHRP Report 500: Guidance for Implementation of the AASHTO Strategic Highway Safety Plan, http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/152868.aspx. Accessed September 2019. United States Road Assessment Program (usRAP), http://www.usrap.org/, Accessed September 2019. Waldheim, N., S. Herbel, and C. Kissel. Integrating Safety in the Rural Transportation Planning Process. Report No. FHWA-SA-13-102. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 2014.

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Traditional approaches to safety have focused on identifying high-crash locations and implementing projects to address predominant concerns at these locations. The systemic approach to safety is a method of safety management that typically involves lower unit cost safety improvements that are widely implemented based on high risk factors.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Research Report 955: Guide for Quantitative Approaches to Systemic Safety Analysis provides guidance to state departments of transportation (DOTs) and other transportation agencies on how to apply a systemic safety management approach for identifying safety improvement projects.

Material associated with the report includes NCHRP Web-Only Document 285: Developing a Guide for Quantitative Approaches to Systemic Safety Analysis and a PowerPoint of the summary of project findings and future research needs.

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