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Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop (2021)

Chapter: Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
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Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
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Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Health Professions Faculty for the Future: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26041.
×
Page 70

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Appendix C Speaker Biographical Sketches Reamer L. Bushardt, Pharm.D., PA-C, DFAAPA (Workshop Co-Chair), is a tenured educator, researcher, clinician, and administrator with experience in rural, community-based practice and with faculty service within three aca- demic medical centers. He is a professor and a senior associate dean in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at The George Washington Univer- sity (GWU) in Washington, DC. In this role, he oversees departments and centers comprising more than 40 programs in the health professions and translational sciences. He is licensed as a physician assistant and a pharma- cist and has specialized training and experience in caring for patients with ­ emphasis on management of chronic illness and interventions to address in- appropriate polypharmacy and drug injury. He regularly teaches and men- tors trainees in the areas of pharmacology and clinical research. He is the principal investigator for the George Washington Health Careers Opportu- nity Program, a health care workforce development program funded by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. He is the director of the Translational Workforce Development in the Clinical Translational Science Institute—Children’s Network (CTSI-CN), funded by the National Insti- tutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science. The CTSI-CN is a partnership between the Children’s National Health System and GWU. Dr. Bushardt is a director-at-large on the board of the Physician Assistant Education Association. He is the editor-in-chief emeritus for the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants. He previously served as a department chair at the Wake Forest School of Medicine and as the associate vice president for workforce innovation at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He was also an 63 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

64 HEALTH PROFESSIONS FACULTY FOR THE FUTURE associate professor and a division chief for physician assistant studies at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Kathy Chappell, Ph.D., R.N., FNAP, FAAN (Workshop Co-Chair), is the senior vice president of certification, measurement, accreditation, and re- search at the American Nurses Credentialing Center. She is responsible for the certification of individual registered nurses and advanced practice regis- tered nurses, as well as the development of certification examinations. She is responsible for the accreditation of organizations that provide continuing nursing education and interprofessional continuing education and for the accreditation of residency and fellowship programs for nurses. She also directs the Institute for Credentialing Research, analyzing outcomes related to credentialing. She holds a baccalaureate in nursing with distinction from the University of Virginia, a master of science in advanced clinical nursing, and a doctorate in nursing from George Mason University. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a distinguished scholar and a fellow in the National Academies of Practice. Anthony R. Artino, Jr., Ph.D., is a tenured professor of health, human function, and rehabilitation sciences at The George Washington University (GWU) School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut and ac- crued more than 23 years of leadership experience as a captain in the U.S. Navy prior to his arrival at GWU. In his current role, he teaches gradu- ate courses, conducts research, mentors students and junior faculty, and provides administrative leadership in evaluation and educational research. As a researcher, he has been the principal or the associate investigator on more than $8 million in funded research. His most highly cited works are a blend of research and education articles on topics ranging from analyz- ing and interpreting survey data, understanding academic motivation and self-­ egulated learning among medical students and practicing physicians, r measuring long-term physician outcomes, and developing questionnaires for educational research. Dr. Artino is a deputy editor for the Journal of ­ raduate Medical Education and an assistant editor for Academic Medi- G cine. He is also a ­ellow of the Association for Medical Education in f Europe. He has published 200 scientific articles and book chapters and con- ducted 150 invited talks, research presentations, and conference workshops on learning and assessment for international audiences around the globe. Shelley Cohen Konrad, Ph.D., LCSW, FNAP, is the director of and a pro- fessor in the School of Social Work and the director of the Center for Excellence in Collaborative Education (CECE). A clinical social worker by training, Dr. Cohen Konrad specializes in practice with children and PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 65 families. The second edition of her book, Practice with Children and Fami- lies: A Relational Perspective, was published in December 2019. In 1988 Dr. Cohen Konrad established Touchstone Psychotherapy Associates, a mental health collaborative designed to meet the complex needs of chil- dren, families, and carers. She co-founded the Kids First Center in 1997, a Portland-based, nonprofit program serving children, parenting partners, and families experiencing divorce, family disruption, and parental separa- tion. Dr. Cohen Konrad is committed to improving the quality of health and health-related care for all people. In 2010 she was named founding director of the University of New England’s Interprofessional Education Collabora- tive (IPEC) and in 2019 IPEC was named as a Center for Excellence in Collaborative Education. CECE designs and implements educational pro- gramming that brings together students and faculty to learn about, from, and with each other. The purpose of shared learning is to prepare graduates to be both excellent in their chosen fields as well as proficient members of practice teams. The overall aims of collaborative education are to improve patient safety, promote population health, social inclusion, and advance equitable, culturally informed, quality health care. Dr. Cohen Konrad’s research and scholarship focuses on children and families, the use of the arts in health education, health perspectives of vulnerable populations, relational learning, and interprofessional education and collaborative care. She is an associate editor for the Journal of Interprofessional Care and the Journal of Family Social Work. Her own work is widely published in peer- reviewed journals. She travels nationally and internationally to consult with other universities seeking to enhance collaborative learning and present her scholarship and research. Kris Hall, M.F.A. (consultant to the planning committee), is the program manager for the Center for Excellence in Collaborative Education at the University of New England (UNE), working across the university to provide opportunities for students to learn with, from, and about each other. She is also the program manager for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Ser- vices Administration–funded screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) grant awarded to UNE to provide training and education in screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment for substance use disorders to students, faculty, and community partners from eight health professions. She formerly served as the associate director for Add Verb Productions, promoting performances aimed at bystander intervention in the realms of domestic violence and sexual assault, and eating disorders respectively. As part of a faculty team, she has given national and interna- tional presentations and published, on the Interprofessional Team Immer- sion, a unique curricular resource that was designed in response to student requests for small, interactive, cross-professional learning experiences. Ms. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

66 HEALTH PROFESSIONS FACULTY FOR THE FUTURE Hall is a graduate of the Maine College of Art and a past participant at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Karen Pardue, Ph.D., M.S., RN, CNE, ANEF (consultant to the plan- ning committee), is the dean for the Westbrook College of Health Profes- sions. She brings to this role 7 years of experience as the associate dean for academic affairs, providing leadership in health profession curriculum development and outcomes assessment, faculty development, and specialty accreditation expertise. Her research and scholarship focuses on inter­ professional (IPE) curriculum development and evaluation. Dr. Pardue led the design and implementation of the University of New England’s (UNE’s) innovative undergraduate IPE coursework. Her experience in nursing edu- cation is diverse, having held faculty and administrative positions in associ- ate, RN to BSN, generic BSN, and master’s-level programs. For 10 years, she executed international teaching and leadership roles through a unique RN to BSN partnership program between UNE and Israel College in Tel Aviv, Israel. She is active in statewide and national organizations address- ing higher education and the preparation of health professionals. She is an invited member to the National League for Nursing (NLN) Strategic Action Group on Disseminating IPE and Collaborative Practices and led the NLN Task Group on Innovation in Nursing Education. She was appointed by the governor of Maine to the New England Board of Higher Education where she currently chairs the Maine delegation, and she has served as a mentor in the national NLN/Johnson & Johnson Faculty Mentoring program. Dr. Pardue has published and presented widely on innovative pedagogies, IPE, and evidence-based approaches to teaching and learning. She is on the edi- torial board of Nurse Educator and she provides manuscript review for a number of nursing and IPE journals. Dr. Pardue was inducted as a fellow into the Academy of Nursing Education in 2007 and she currently chairs the Fellow Selection Committee. She is a recipient of grant awards from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, the Bingham Program Foundation, and a Josiah Macy President’s Award targeting IPE curriculum and faculty development. Roderic I. Pettigrew, Ph.D., M.D., serves as the chief executive officer of engineering health (EnHealth) and is the executive dean for the engineering medicine (EnMed) program at Texas A&M University, in partnership with Houston Methodist Hospital. Dr. Pettigrew also holds the endowed Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry. EnHealth is the nation’s first comprehensive educational program to fully integrate engineering into all health-related dis- ciplines. EnMed is the nation’s first 4-year, fully integrated engineering and medical education curriculum leading to both an M.D. and a master’s degree in engineering. An internationally recognized leader in biomedical imaging PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 67 and bioengineering, Dr. Pettigrew served as the first director for the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Prior to his appointment at NIH, he joined the Emory University School of Medicine as a professor of radiology and the Georgia Institute of Technology as a professor of bioengineering. Dr. Pettigrew is well known for pioneering four-dimensional imaging of the cardio­ ascular system v using magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to his numerous achieve- ments, he is an elected member to both the National Academy of Medi- cine and the National Academy of Engineering. After receiving his B.S. in p ­ hysics from Morehouse College as a Merrill Scholar, Dr. Pettigrew attended R ­ ensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he earned his M.S. in nuclear science and engineering. Dr. Pettigrew received his Ph.D. in radiation physics at the M ­ assachusetts Institute of Technology and attained his medical doctorate from Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. Norma Iris Poll-Hunter, Ph.D., is the senior director of human capital ini- tiatives within Diversity Policy and Programs at the Association of Ameri- can Medical Colleges (AAMC). In this role, she leads a portfolio of career development programs with a focus on diversity and inclusion across the medical education continuum. She serves as the deputy director for the Summer Health Professions Education Program, a national pipeline pro- gram to increase diversity in the health professions. She also leads initiatives focused on cultural competence in medical education, building collabora- tions and partnerships to advance diversity, and research and evaluation projects focused on diversity in the health care workforce. Prior to AAMC, Dr. Poll-Hunter practiced as a bilingual psychologist at a regional hospital in upstate New York. Following receipt of her B.A. from Lehman College, City University of New York, Dr. Poll-Hunter earned her Ph.D. in counsel- ing psychology at the University of Albany, SUNY. John-Paul Sánchez, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the president of the Building the Next Generation of Academic Physicians, Inc. (BNGAP), whose mission is to help diverse medical students and residents become aware of academic medicine as a career option and to provide them with the resources to further explore and potentially embark on an academic medicine career. In 2014, he joined the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School as the assistant dean for diversity and inclusion. Dr. Sánchez recently completed terms on the National Hispanic Medical Association and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools and was elected to serve as the co-executive director of Latino Medical Student Association National, a 501(c)(3) non- profit organization founded to represent, support, educate, and unify U.S. Latino(a) premedical and medical students. He also currently sits on the board of the Callen Lorde LGBT Community Health Center in New York PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

68 HEALTH PROFESSIONS FACULTY FOR THE FUTURE City. He received his M.D. from Einstein, completed his residency training at Jacobi/Montefiore, and is board certified in emergency medicine. He also holds an M.P.H., with a concentration in the epidemiology of infectious diseases, from the Yale School of Public Health. He is of Puerto Rican an- cestry, gay-identified, and was raised in the Bronx, NYC. Lawrence Sherman, FACEHP, CHCP, is the principal at Meducate Global, LLC, a U.S.-based organization involved in the assessment of global health care education systems worldwide, faculty development for educators of health care professionals, and support of continuing professional develop- ment in health care worldwide. He also holds an international development position with the Association for Medical Education in Europe. Mr. Sherman ­ has been involved in medical and interprofessional education, with a concen- tration in continuing education, for more than 25 years, and has authored numerous scholarly publications and delivered hundreds of presentations worldwide on topics related to medical education. Mr. Sherman is active ­ in the continuing education profession worldwide, with key involvement and participation in organizations, societies, and academic institutions glob- ally. Some of the organizations include the Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference and the Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Profes- sions. Mr. Sherman is the social media editor for the Journal for Continuing Education in the Health Professions and is a reviewer for the Journal of European CME, Medical Teacher, and the Asia Pacific Scholar. Mr. ­ herman S is a frequent speaker at global health care conferences; examples of his presentations include talks at TEDxMaastricht (http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=YpSd5u_di9w), Singularity University (http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=B4Qkbw8969w), and Villanova University (https://reachmd.com/ programs/villanova_health_summit/observations-medical-educator-turned- patient/8078). Frequent lecture topics include faculty training, optimizing presentation and communications skills, interprofessional continuing edu- cation, globalizing medical education, humor in medical education, needs assessments and outcomes in health care education, customer service in medicine, understanding learners in medical education, health care com- munications, and the future of health care education. He often moderates consensus panels and curriculum development meetings and also leads the podium skills training sessions and faculty development workshops. He has also hosted an Internet radio show focusing on key topics in medical educa- tion that is broadcast on the ReachMD platform. Mr. Sherman has also been an educator in emergency medicine for the Emergency Medical Institute and the Center for Learning and Innovation of the Northwell Health System in Long Island, New York, and he has lectured in the Healthcare Communi- cations program at the Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, also in New York. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX C 69 Aliki Thomas, Ph.D., OT (consultant to the planning committee), is an asso­ iate professor in the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy and c an associate member of the Institute of Health Sciences Education, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University. She earned a doctorate in educational psy- chology with a major in instructional psychology and a minor in applied cognitive science. She completed postdoctoral training at McMaster Uni- versity in knowledge translation for evidence-based practice. Dr. Thomas’s research is guided by the principles of the Scholarship of Practice whereby research, education, and practice are interwoven and interconnected with the aim of improving the health, function, and participation of individuals in our society. Informed by theories from educational psychology, applied cognitive science, and implementation science, and using mixed meth- odological approaches, Dr. Thomas’s research program seeks to under- stand the developmental trajectory from the classroom, where entry-level evidence-based practice competencies are initially acquired, to the real life “messy” clinical practice context where graduates are expected to navigate multiple influences to provide evidence-based and patient-centered care. Her research program is organized under three main themes: (1) educa- tion for evidence-based practices in the health professions, (2) knowledge translation for evidence-based education and clinical practice, and (3) the education–practice nexus. Dr. Thomas has a thriving research lab with sev- eral graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. More information about her and her students’ research activities can be obtained at https://www. mcgill.ca/keep-lab. Valerie N. Williams, Ph.D., M.P.A., is a University of Oklahoma Presiden- tial Professor in the Health Sciences Center Graduate College and holds academic appointments in the Colleges of Medicine and Public Health. She serves as the vice provost for academic affairs and faculty development at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC). In this role she has responsibility for campus-wide academic affairs, academic integrity, and faculty development issues. Dr. Williams created the OUHSC Faculty Leadership Program for interprofessional faculty development and mentoring in 1990. During her career she has served as a mentor or coach for more than 1,000 faculty. Dr. Williams founded and directs the federally designated University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities for Oklahoma. She is the senior director for the professional development core of the National Institutes of Health–supported Oklahoma Shared C ­ linical and Translational Resources Center. Nationally, Dr. Williams’s serves on the Educational Advisory Committee for the Association of ­ merican Medical Colleges (AAMC) Minority Faculty Leadership Develop- A ment Programs, and she serves as the co-chair (with Dr. Robert Alpern) for ­ the AAMC Physician-Scientist Advisory Panel. Dr. Williams’s earned a B.S. ­ PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

70 HEALTH PROFESSIONS FACULTY FOR THE FUTURE from Syracuse University (SU) in biology and psychology (major: genetics), an M.P.A. from the Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs at SU, and a Ph.D. in allied health sciences from the University of Oklahoma. She is a lifetime member of the Alpha Phi Omega national service organization. She has received several national awards including the AAMC Group on Faculty Affairs Carol J. Bland Phronesis Award honoring “members of the faculty affairs community who exemplify the spirit of phronesis through dedicated and selfless promotion of faculty vitality.” PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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To explore various aspects of faculty development, the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a virtual workshop in August 2020 titled Health Professions Faculty for the Future. At the workshop, presenters provided examples of how educators are using effective teaching strategies and of practices in health professional education. This publication summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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