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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Page 227
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Page 228
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Page 230
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
×
Page 232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Biographies ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26061.
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PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS APPENDIX D COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES DR. EVE HIGGINBOTHAM (NAM) is the inaugural vice dean for inclusion and diversity of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, a position she assumed on August 1, 2013. She is also a senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics and professor of ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) since 2000 and is now an elected member of the NAM Council, upon which she chairs the Finance Committee. Dr. Higginbotham is also a member of the Governing Board of the National Research Council and past president of the AOA Medical Honor Society. Notable prior leadership positions in academia include dean of the Morehouse School of Medicine, senior vice president for health sciences at Howard University, and professor and chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, a position she held for 12 years. She formerly chaired her section of the National Academy of Medicine and is a former member of the NAM membership committee. Dr. Higginbotham also serves as an associate editor on the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology. Dr. Higginbotham, a practicing glaucoma specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, has either authored or coauthored over 150 peer-reviewed articles and coedited four ophthalmology textbooks. She continues to remain active in scholarship related to glaucoma, health policy, STEM, and patient care. She holds degrees undergraduate and graduate degrees in chemical engineering from MIT, a medical doctorate from Harvard Medical School, 225

226 THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON THE CAREERS OF WOMEN IN ACADEMIC STEMM completed her residency in ophthalmology at the LSU Eye Center, and completed a master’s of law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School. DR. ELENA FUENTES-AFFLICK (NAM) is a professor and vice chair of pediatrics and chief of pediatrics at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, and vice dean for academic affairs in the School of Medicine at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In 2012, Dr. Fuentes-Afflick was appointed vice dean for academic affairs and faculty development for the School of Medicine. She is responsible for overseeing all academic affairs in the School of Medicine, including the recruitment, development, and advancement of a diversified academic workforce of the highest caliber. She is also responsible for overseeing innovative programs for faculty orientation, career development, and leadership training. After completing her undergraduate and medical education at the University of Michigan, Dr. Fuentes-Afflick came to UCSF for her residency training in pediatrics, followed by a fellowship in health policy at UCSF and MPH in epidemiology from UC Berkeley. She has served in several important national leadership roles, including president of the Society for Pediatric Research, president of the American Pediatric Society, and service on the Council of the National Institute for Child Health and Development. Dr. Fuentes-Afflick was chair of the UCSF Academic Senate from 2009 to 2011. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2010 and has served as a member of several consensus study committees. DR. LESLIE D. GONZALES is an associate professor in the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Learning unit at Michigan State University in the College of Education. She also serves as an affiliate faculty member in the Center for Gender in a Global Context and Chicano/Latinx PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX D 227 studies. As a Latina, first-generation-college-student-turned-academic who earned all three of her academic degrees from Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Dr. Gonzales now studies how relations of power, privilege, and prestige operate in ways that can be detrimental to historically underrepresented scholars. In addition to her faculty role, Dr. Gonzales serves as the faculty advocate for the College of Education at Michigan State University—a role that allows her to apply her research to practice and advance equity-oriented practices and systems change. Dr. Gonzales is currently the co-principal investigator on Aspire, a multimillion dollar project sponsored by the National Science Foundation. DR. JENI HART is the dean of the Graduate School and vice provost for graduate studies at the University of Missouri. She is also professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis (ELPA). Dr. Hart joined ELPA as an assistant professor in 2003. She completed her Ph.D. in higher education administration at the University of Arizona. Prior to becoming a faculty member, she worked for 9 years as a student affairs educator at a number of colleges and universities, and 1 year as a faculty member at Southeast Missouri State University. Dr. Hart’s scholarship centers on three mutually reinforcing themes: faculty work, gender and feminisms, and campus climate. Specifically, she is interested in how organizational structures in academe mutually shape the experiences of those in higher education, particularly women and feminist faculty. Dr. Hart serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education and the NASPA Journal about Women in Higher Education. PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

228 THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON THE CAREERS OF WOMEN IN ACADEMIC STEMM DR. RESHMA JAGSI, M.D., D.Phil., is Newman Family Professor and deputy chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. She graduated first in her class from Harvard College and then pursued her medical training at Harvard Medical School. She also served as a fellow in the Center for Ethics at Harvard University and completed her doctorate in Social Policy at Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar. A substantial focus of her research considers issues of bioethics and gender equity in academic medicine. Her investigations of women’s underrepresentation in senior positions in academic medicine and the mechanisms that must be targeted to promote equity have been funded by two National Institutes of Health R01 grants and grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, American Medical Association, and other philanthropic funders. She leads the national program evaluation for the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Fund to Retain Clinician Scientists, a large national intervention that was inspired in part by her own research. Active in organized medicine, she has served on the Steering Committee of the American Association of Medical Colleges’ Group on Women in Medicine in Science and now serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. She was part of the Lancet’s advisory committee for its theme issue on women in science, medicine, and global health. DR. LEAH JAMIESON (NAE) is Ransburg Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University and John A. Edwardson Dean Emerita of the College of Engineering, and holds a courtesy appointment in Purdue’s School of Engineering Education. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX D 229 and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). She is cofounder and past director of the Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program. She was an inaugural recipient of the National Science Foundation Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars. Dr. Jamieson served on the steering committee for the NAE report Changing the Conversation: Developing Effective Messages for Improving Public Understanding of Engineering, the National Research Council report Barriers and Opportunities for 2-Year and 4- Year STEM Degrees: Systemic Change to Support Students’ Diverse Pathways, and the National Academies report Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors. She has served as president and chief executive officer of the IEEE, board chair of the Anita Borg Institute, and cochair of the Computing Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research. She received a S.B. in mathematics from MIT and M.A., M.S.E, and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science, all from Princeton University. She has been awarded honorary doctorates by Drexel University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. DR. ERICK C. JONES is a professor and associate dean for graduate studies in the College of Engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). He is currently the George and Elizabeth Pickett Endowed Professor in Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering. Dr. Jones returned from his 3-year rotating detail at the the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he was a program director in the Engineering Directorate for Engineering Research Centers Program. Earlier Dr. Jones worked at NSF in the Education Directorate, where he worked in the Division of Graduate Education and led the INTERN and Graduate Research Internship Programs. He was also a program director for the prestigious Graduate Research PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

230 THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON THE CAREERS OF WOMEN IN ACADEMIC STEMM Fellowship (GRF) Program. Dr. Jones was one of the few program officers who worked in two directorates as a rotating program director. Prior to joining UTA, Dr. Jones worked at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for 8 years, where he initially received tenure. He is the George and Elizabeth Pickett Endowed Professor of Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering and served as deputy director of UTA’s Security Advances via Nanotechnologies Center from 2013 to 2015. He is an active member of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE), American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Dr. Jones has served IISE, NSBE, and other organizations as faculty advisor for the past decade; served as an Alfred Sloan Minority Ph.D. program director and now on the Sloan Mentoring Network Board; has worked with the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering for over a decade; and was one of the initial founders and past chair of Texas A&M’s Black Former Students Network. Jones was recognized as an Alfred Sloan Underrepresented Minority Ph.D. Program Fellow and has been honored by the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering three times. Dr. Jones earned his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from Texas A&M University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in industrial engineering from the University of Houston. DR. BERONDA MONTGOMERY is professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and microbiology and molecular genetics in the Department of Energy (DOE) Plant Research Laboratory at Michigan State University (MSU). She completed doctoral studies in plant biology at the University of California, Davis, and was a National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded postdoctoral fellow in microbial biology at Indiana University. Since starting at MSU in 2004, Dr. Montgomery’s laboratory investigates the mechanisms by which organisms such as plants PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX D 231 and cyanobacteria that have limited mobility are able to monitor and adjust to changes in their external environment. The ability of these largely immobile organisms to adapt their patterns of growth and development to fluctuations in external environmental parameters increases their survival and maximizes their growth and productivity. Dr. Montgomery’s scholarly efforts were recognized by her receipt of an NSF CAREER Award in 2007, being selected as a finalist in the 2014 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professors Competition, and a 2015 Michigan State University Nominee for the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) U.S. Professor of the Year Award. In addition to her core research and teaching efforts, Dr. Montgomery is also actively involved in scholarly efforts to promote effective research mentoring and management and the inclusion and success of individuals from groups underrepresented in the sciences. She has published extensively on evidence-based strategies to nurture and retain talent in academia, developing strategies for effective mentorship that center on the individual and their specific needs and goals. As an expert in effective and evidence-based mentorship, Dr. Montgomery serves on a number of leadership boards and as a consultant to universities working toward greater diversity, equity, and inclusion within their research and education programs. DR. KYLE MYERS is an assistant professor of business administration in the Technology and Operations Management unit of Harvard Business School (HBS). Dr. Myers studies the economics of innovation. His research lies at the intersections of science, health care, and the commercialization process. More specifically, Professor Myers is interested in the strategic choices and performance of scientists, the supply and demand of innovation in high-tech sectors, public versus private funding of research and development, and the management of innovation in PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

232 THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON THE CAREERS OF WOMEN IN ACADEMIC STEMM large organizations such as hospitals and pharmaceutical and engineering firms. His work has received funding from the Kauffman Foundation and was awarded the NBER-IFS Predoctoral Scholarship in the Value of Medical Research. Professor Myers holds a Ph.D. from the Wharton School’s Department of Health Care Management and Economics. He has an M.S. in health policy and management and a B.S. in biology from Penn State University. Prior to joining HBS, he served as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. DR. RENETTA TULL is the vice chancellor of diversity, equity and inclusion at the University of California, Davis. Before joining UC Davis in 2019, Dr. Tull was associate vice provost for strategic initiatives at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), and professor of the practice in UMBC’s College of Engineering and IT (COEIT). Within COEIT, she served as part of the “Engagement” team, and pursues research in humanitarian engineering. Dr. Tull is founding director and co-principal investigator for the 12-institution National Science Foundation University System of Maryland’s (USM) PROMISE AGEP, and codirector/co- principal investigator for the NSF USM’s Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP). In addition to roles at UMBC and roles with grants, she also served the University System of Maryland as special assistant to the senior vice chancellor for academic affairs and student affairs, and was the system’s director of graduate and professional pipeline development. In 2017, Dr. Tull was appointed to serve as chair for the University System of Maryland’s Health Care Workforce Diversity subgroup. Dr. Tull has engineering and science degrees from Howard University and Northwestern University. Dr. Tull served on the Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM consensus study committee. PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

APPENDIX D 233 MS. MARIA LUND DAHLBERG is a senior program officer and study director with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce and the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Her current work focuses on the Impact of COVID-19 on the Research Careers of Women in Academic Science, Engineering, and Medicine; the Response and Adaptation of Higher Education to the COVID-19 Pandemic; the Science on Effective Mentoring in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine); and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Postsecondary Education. Her work with the National Academies spans topics ranging from equity and identity in science, through science communications, to postdoctoral research experiences, health care, and innovation ecosystems. She came to the National Academies by way of a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellowship, which she received after completing all requirements short of finalizing the dissertation for her doctorate in physics at the Pennsylvania State University. Ms. Lund Dahlberg holds a B.A. with high honors in physics from Vassar College and an M.S. in physics from Pennsylvania State University. PREPUBLICATION COPY | UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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The spring of 2020 marked a change in how almost everyone conducted their personal and professional lives, both within science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) and beyond. The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted global scientific conferences and individual laboratories and required people to find space in their homes from which to work. It blurred the boundaries between work and non-work, infusing ambiguity into everyday activities. While adaptations that allowed people to connect became more common, the evidence available at the end of 2020 suggests that the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic endangered the engagement, experience, and retention of women in academic STEMM, and may roll back some of the achievement gains made by women in the academy to date.

Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic STEMM identifies, names, and documents how the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the careers of women in academic STEMM during the initial 9-month period since March 2020 and considers how these disruptions - both positive and negative - might shape future progress for women. This publication builds on the 2020 report Promising Practices for Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine to develop a comprehensive understanding of the nuanced ways these disruptions have manifested. Impact of COVID-19 on the Careers of Women in Academic STEMM will inform the academic community as it emerges from the pandemic to mitigate any long-term negative consequences for the continued advancement of women in the academic STEMM workforce and build on the adaptations and opportunities that have emerged.

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