National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R1
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R2
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R3
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R4
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R5
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R6
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R7
Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R10
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R11
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R12
Page xiii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R13
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26079.
×
Page R14

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

PREPUBLICATION COPY     Committee on Future Use of NASA Airborne Platforms   to Advance Earth Science Priorities    Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate  Division on Earth and Life Studies    Space Studies Board  Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences    This prepublication version of Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities:  Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft has been provided to the public to facilitate timely access  to the report. Although the substance of the report is final, editorial changes may be made throughout  the text and citations will be checked prior to publication. The final report will be available through the  National Academies Press in spring 2021.    A Consensus Study Report of          PREPUBLICATION COPY 

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001  This activity was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and The National  Aeronautics and Space Administration, under contract number 10004838. Any opinions, findings,  conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of  any organization or agency that provided support for the project.  International Standard Book Number‐13: 978‐0‐309‐XXXXX‐X  International Standard Book Number‐10: 0‐309‐XXXXX‐X  Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/26079 Additional copies of this publication are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street,  NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624‐6242 or (202) 334‐3313; http://www.nap.edu.   Copyright 2021 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.  Printed in the United States of America  Suggested citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Airborne Platforms  to  Advance  NASA  Earth  System  Science  Priorities:  Assessing  the  Future  Need  for  a  Large  Aircraft.  Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/26079.  PREPUBLICATION COPY 

    The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President  Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and  technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia  McNutt is president.    The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National  Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected  by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson is president.    The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under  the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues.  Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J.  Dzau is president.    The three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine  to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve  complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education  and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in  matters of science, engineering, and medicine.     Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at  www.nationalacademies.org.     PREPUBLICATION COPY 

      Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and  Medicine document the evidence‐based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring  committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on  information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been  subjected to a rigorous and independent peer‐review process and it represents the position of the  National Academies on the statement of task.    Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine chronicle the  presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National  Academies. The statements and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are  not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies.    For information about other products and activities of the National Academies, please  visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo.     PREPUBLICATION COPY 

  COMMITTEE ON FUTURE USE OF NASA AIRBORNE PLATFORMS   TO ADVANCE EARTH SCIENCE PRIORITIES    WILLIAM H. BRUNE (Co‐Chair), Pennsylvania State University  SHUYI S. CHEN (Co‐Chair), University of Washington  KRISTIE A. BOERING (NAS), University of California, Berkeley  CATHERINE F. CAHILL, University of Alaska, Fairbanks  JAMES H. CRAWFORD, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center  DAVID FAHEY, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  SARAH T. GILLE, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego  VANDA GRUBIŠIĆ, National Center for Atmospheric Research  GEORGE J. KOMAR, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (retired)  ERIC A. KORT, University of Michigan  ZHONG LU, Southern Methodist University  GREG McFARQUHAR, University of Oklahoma  WALTER N. MEIER, National Snow and Ice Data Center and Cooperative Institute for Research in  Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado  CHARLES E. MILLER, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  ANNE NOLIN, University of Nevada  BEAT SCHMID, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  SUSAN L. USTIN, University of California, Davis    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Staff  APRIL MELVIN, Study Director  AMANDA PURCELL, Study Director  ART CHARO, Senior Program Officer, Space Studies Board  AMANDA STAUDT, Senior Board Director  RACHEL SILVERN, Associate Program Officer  ERIN MARKOVICH, Research Associate  ROB GREENWAY, Program Associate  PREPUBLICATION COPY  v 

  BOARD ON ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES AND CLIMATE    MARY GLACKIN (Chair), The Weather Company, an IBM Business (Ret.)  CYNTHIA S. ATHERTON, Heising‐Simons Foundation  CECILIA BITZ, University of Washington  JOHN C. CHIANG, University of California, Berkeley  BRAD R. COLMAN, The Climate Corporation  BART CROES, California Air Resources Board (Ret.)  ROBERT B. DUNBAR, Stanford University  EFI FOUFOULA‐GEORGIOU (NAE), University of California, Irvine  PETER C. FRUMHOFF, Union of Concerned Scientists  VANDA GRUBIŠIĆ, National Center for Atmospheric Research  ZHANQING LI, University of Maryland  ROBERT KOPP, Rutgers University  L. RUBY LEUNG (NAE), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  JONATHAN MARTIN, University of Wisconsin–Madison  AMY McGOVERN, Oklahoma University  JONATHAN PATZ, University of Wisconsin–Madison  JAMES MARSHALL SHEPHERD, University of Georgia  ALLISON STEINER, University of Michigan  DAVID W. TITLEY, USN (Ret.), Pennsylvania State University  ARADHNA TRIPATI, University of California, Los Angeles  DUANE E. WALISER, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  ELKE WEBER (NAS), Princeton University    National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Staff  AMANDA STAUDT, Senior Board Director  LAUREN EVERETT, Senior Program Officer  LAURIE GELLER, Senior Program Officer  APRIL MELVIN, Senior Program Officer  AMANDA PURCELL, Senior Program Officer  ALEX REICH, Associate Program Officer  RACHEL SILVERN, Associate Program Officer  SHELLY FREELAND, Financial Assistant  RITA GASKINS, Administrative Coordinator  ROB GREENWAY, Program Associate    PREPUBLICATION COPY  vi 

SPACE STUDIES BOARD  MARGARET G. KIVELSON (Chair) (NAS), University of California, Los Angeles  GREGORY P. ASNER (NAS), Arizona State University  ADAM S. BURROWS (NAS), Princeton University  JAMES H. CROCKER (NAE), Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (Ret.)  MARY LYNNE DITTMAR, Dittmar Associates, Inc.  JEFF DOZIER, University of California, Santa Barbara  MELINDA DARBY DYAR, Mount Holyoke College  ANTONIO L ELIAS (NAE), Orbital ATK, Inc. (Ret.)  VICTORIA E. HAMILTON, Southwest Research Institute  CHRYSSA KOUVELIOTOU (NAS), George Washington University  DENNIS P. LETTENMAIER (NAE), University of California, Los Angeles  ROSALY M. LOPES, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  STEPHEN J. MACKWELL, American Institute of Physics  DAVID J. McCOMAS, Princeton University  LARRY PAXTON, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory  ELIOT QUATAERT (NAS), Princeton University  MARK P. SAUNDERS, Independent consultant  BARBARA SHERWOOD LOLLAR (NAE), University of Toronto  HOWARD J. SINGER, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  HARLAN E. SPENCE, University of New Hampshire  ERIKA WAGNER, Blue Origin  PAUL D. WOOSTER, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX)  EDWARD L. WRIGHT (NAS), University of California, Los Angeles  National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Staff  COLLEEN HARTMAN, Director for Space and Aeronautics  ARTHUR CHARO, Senior Program Officer  SANDRA GRAHAM, Senior Program Officer  ABIGAIL SHEFFER, Senior Program Officer  DAVID SMITH, Senior Program Officer  DANIEL NAGASAWA, Program Officer  MEG KNEMEYER, Financial Officer  TANJA PILZAK, Manager, Program Operations   ANDREA REBHOLZ, Program Coordinator  DIONNA WISE, Program Coordinator  CELESTE A. NAYLOR, Information Management Associate  MIA BROWN, Research Associate  MEGAN CHAMBERLAIN, Senior Program Assistant  GAYBRIELLE HOLBERT, Senior Program Assistant  RADAKA LIGHTFOOT, Senior Financial Assistant  PREPUBLICATION COPY  vii 

  Preface    On its first science mission in 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) DC‐8  aircraft flew over Antarctica to examine the ozone hole, initiating its long important role in NASA  airborne Earth system science research. For the past 34 years, it has since flown missions all around the  world studying phenomena in our changing world, such as tropical cyclones, wildland fires, melting polar  ice caps, deforestation, and geological hazards. A strength of the DC‐8 is its unique combination of  endurance, range, payload weight and power capacity, flexibility in payload composition, altitude range  and ceiling, and space to accommodate many investigators. These characteristics have made it well  suited for carrying a wide array of instrument payloads to do a wide array of Earth system science  research while also providing a testbed for satellite instrument prototypes and helping develop two  generations of Earth system scientists. However, it is nearing the end of its useful life.  At the behest of NASA, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (the National  Academies) assembled a committee of accomplished scientists in diverse Earth system science fields to  assess the future need for a large aircraft to serve NASA Earth system science priorities.   About the time that the committee was being assembled, gatherings were shut down to reduce the  spread of COVID‐19. As a result, the committee never met in person. What would have been a series of  2‐day meetings became a scattering of 2‐ to 3‐hour Zoom calls fit into the committee members’  schedules. Although the difficulties that COVID‐19 presented to the committee are insignificant  compared to its other consequences, the lack of in‐person meetings forced us to rethink our approach  to developing this consensus report. Only extra effort by the National Academies' staff and the  committee made delivering the report possible.  The committee gathered information early in the study process at a two‐day virtual workshop, when  experts gave presentations on the research questions confronting their Earth system science disciplines  and the roles aircraft have in answering those questions. We are grateful to the speakers: Greg Asner,  Mary Barth, William Dietrich, Ralph Dubayah, Emily Fischer, Scott Hensley, Michelle Hofton, Simon  Hook, Robert Houze, Daniel Jacob, Raphael Kudela, Mark Merrifield, Mahta Moghaddam, Amin Nehrir,  Tamay Özgökmen, Laura Pan, Tamlin Pavelsky, Simone Tanelli, Kirsty Tinto, Carrie Vuyovich, Josh Willis,  Steve Wofsy, Robert Wood, and Robert Wright. We also appreciate all the comments received from  members of the Earth system science research community and the extensive information collected and  provided to the committee by NASA.  We have had the pleasure of working with some talented people at the National Academies. April  Melvin and Amanda Purcell, Senior Program Officers, provided guidance, cohesion, flexibility, and  stability as we navigated through this new all‐virtual process. Art Charo and Amanda Staudt provided  timely insights based on their vast experience. We thank them.  Finally, we thank every member of the committee. Each one made substantial contributions. We  appreciate everyone’s time and effort, insights, and commitment to creating the best possible report.  An additional benefit of working with this outstanding committee has been learning about the breadth  of Earth system science research. We are confident that this committee’s recommendations provide an  excellent guide for NASA’s decisions regarding airborne platforms for advancing its Earth system science  priorities.  Shuyi Chen, Committee Co‐Chair  William Brune, Committee Co‐Chair  PREPUBLICATION COPY  ix 

   

    Acknowledgments    This Consensus Study Report was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse  perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and  critical comments that will assist the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in  making each published report as sound as possible and to ensure that it meets the institutional  standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review  comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.    We thank the following individuals for their review of this report:  ANA P. BARROS (NAE), Duke University  DAVID DeROSIER (NAS), Brandeis University  CRAIG GLENNIE, University of Houston  ERIN HESTIR, University of California, Merced  TRISTAN L'ECUYER, University of Wisconsin–Madison  LUC LENAIN, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego  ROBYN MILLAN, Dartmouth College  R. STEVEN NEREM, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences  CAROLINE NOWLAN, Harvard‐Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics  DAVID PETERSON, Naval Research Laboratory  DAR ROBERTS, University of California, Santa Barbara  ARMIN SOROOSHIAN, University of Arizona  LEIGH STEARNS, University of Kansas  DARIN TOOHEY, University of Colorado    Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were  not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations of this report nor did they see the final draft  before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Thomas H. Vonder Haar (NAE), Colorado  State University, and Nancy Baker, Naval Research Laboratory. They were responsible for making certain  that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with the standards of the  National Academies and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final  content rests entirely with the authoring committee and the National Academies.    PREPUBLICATION COPY  xi 

Contents  Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 1  1 Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 11  1.1 Background Context .......................................................................................................................... 11  1.2 Committee’s Task .............................................................................................................................. 11  1.3 Report Blueprint ................................................................................................................................ 13  2 Setting the Stage: The Role of Airborne Platforms in Earth System Science ..................................... 15  2.1 Future of Earth System Science ........................................................................................................ 15  2.2 Integrated Earth System Science Research ....................................................................................... 16  2.3 Role of Airborne Observation Component ....................................................................................... 17  2.4 A Synopsis of the Current Airborne Fleet ......................................................................................... 19  2.4a Aircraft ........................................................................................................................................ 19  2.4b UAS .............................................................................................................................................. 20  2.4c Balloons ....................................................................................................................................... 21  2.4d Aircraft from Other Countries ..................................................................................................... 22  2.4e Airborne Research Using Many Platforms .................................................................................. 23  2.5 Evolution of Instrumentation for Airborne Science .......................................................................... 23  2.5a NASA Facility Instruments ........................................................................................................... 23  2.5b Other Instrumentation and Some Common Applications .......................................................... 26  2.5c Deployable Instruments .............................................................................................................. 27  2.5d Miniaturization ........................................................................................................................... 27  3 The DC‐8 Airborne Research Platform ............................................................................................. 29  3.1 Historic Role of Long‐Range, Heavy‐Lift Aircraft ............................................................................... 29  3.2 NASA DC‐8 Specifications .................................................................................................................. 30  3.3 Comparisons of the NASA DC‐8 with Other Research Aircraft ......................................................... 35  3.4 NASA DC‐8 Historic Usage ................................................................................................................. 38  3.4a Characteristic Statistics ............................................................................................................... 38  3.4b Hours per Application ................................................................................................................. 38  3.5 Characteristics of a Future Large Aircraft ......................................................................................... 42  3.6 Candidates for a Future Large Aircraft .............................................................................................. 44  4 The Role of Airborne Platforms in Addressing Emerging Science ...................................................... 47  4.1 Priority Science and Applications Areas in ESAS ............................................................................... 49  4.1a Coupling of the Water and Energy Cycles ................................................................................... 49  4.1b Physics and Dynamics for Improving Weather Forecasts ........................................................... 55  4.1c Air Quality and Atmospheric Chemistry—Chemistry Coupled to Dynamics ............................... 62  4.1d Ecosystem Change—Land and Ocean ......................................................................................... 74  4.1e Sea level Rise in a Changing Climate and Coastal Impacts ......................................................... 82  4.1f Surface Dynamics, Geological Hazards, and Disasters ................................................................ 87  4.2 Providing Capacity for Expanding Future Earth System Research Needs ......................................... 93  4.2a Integrating Themes in Earth System Science .............................................................................. 93  4.2b Large Aircraft in Interdisciplinary Earth System Science ............................................................ 93  4.2c Providing Capacity for the Unexpected ..................................................................................... 100  5 Workforce Training and Development ........................................................................................... 103  5.1 Recruiting Undergraduates ............................................................................................................. 103  5.2 Training Graduate Students and Postdocs ...................................................................................... 104  PREPUBLICATION COPY  xiii 

5.3 Mentoring Early Career Scientists ................................................................................................... 106  5.3a Outreach to K‐12 Students and the Public ................................................................................ 107  5.5 Developing a culture of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion ................................................................ 108  5.6 Fostering International Research Capacity ..................................................................................... 109  6 Recommendations for the Future Need of a Large Aircraft ............................................................ 111  References ....................................................................................................................................... 119  Appendix A: Committee Member Biographies ................................................................................. 139  Appendix B: Statement of Task ........................................................................................................ 147  Appendix C: Acronyms ..................................................................................................................... 149  Appendix D: 2017 Earth Science and Applications from Space Decadal Survey Table 3.2 .................. 153  Appendix E: Atmospheric Chemistry Detailed Measurements ...................  165 PREPUBLICATION COPY  xiv

Next: Summary »
Airborne Platforms to Advance NASA Earth System Science Priorities: Assessing the Future Need for a Large Aircraft Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $50.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other U.S. science research agencies operate a fleet of research aircraft and other airborne platforms that offer diverse capabilities. To inform NASA's future investments in airborne platforms, this study examines whether a large aircraft that would replace the current NASA DC-8 is needed to address Earth system science questions, and the role of other airborne platforms for achieving future Earth system science research goals.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!