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Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks (2021)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Hedvig “Hedi” Hricak, M.D., Ph.D. (Chair), is the chair of the Department of Radiology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; a member of the Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program at the Sloan Kettering Institute; and a professor at the Gerstner Sloan Kettering Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in New York City. She has served on a number of national advisory boards and councils, including the National Institutes of Health’s Board of Scientific Counselors, the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Cancer Institute, the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. She has served as the chair, the co-chair, or a member on a number of National Academies studies. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and a “foreign” member of both the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. For her efforts to promote national and international education and collaboration in oncologic imaging and low-dose radiation safety from diagnostic imaging exposures, she has won numerous awards, including the David Rall Medal for Distinguished Leadership from the NAM, 5 gold medals, and honorary memberships or fellowships in 22 international radiological societies. She holds an honorary doctorate from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, and Toulouse III Paul Sabatier University in Toulouse, France.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

R. Julian Preston, Ph.D. (Vice Chair), is currently a special government employee (expert) with the Radiation Protection Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He was previously the associate director for health for the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of EPA. He also served as the director of the Environmental Carcinogenesis Division at EPA and as the senior science adviser at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology. He has been employed at the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has served as the associate director for the Oak Ridge–University of Tennessee Graduate School for Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Preston’s research and current activities have focused on the mechanisms of radiation and chemical carcinogenesis and the approaches for incorporating these types of data into cancer risk assessments. Dr. Preston currently serves on two National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements committees and is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board and was recently a member of the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Committee on Low Dose Radiation Research. Dr. Preston was the chair of Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), a member of the ICRP Main Commission, and the representative and a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He served as the chair for the National Research Council’s Committee to Assess the Scientific Information for the Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program and on the Task Group on the Biological Effects of Space Radiation. He is an associate editor of Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis and Chemico-Biological Interactions. Dr. Preston has had more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and chapters published. He received his B.A. and M.A. from Peterhouse, Cambridge University, England, in genetics and his Ph.D. from Reading University, England, in radiation genetics.

Amy Berrington de González, D.Phil., is the branch chief and a senior investigator in the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute. She is an internationally recognized cancer epidemiologist who has made important contributions to the understanding of cancer risks from medical radiation exposures. Dr. Berrington de González is the principal investigator (PI) of the U.S. Pediatric Proton Therapy Cohort, the Kaiser Breast Cancer Survivors Study, and co-PI of the UK Pediatric CT scans cohort, which was the first epidemiological study to support a direct link between CT scans and subsequent cancer risk. Dr. Berrington de González is currently a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board and has participated in numerous national and international radiation and cancer advisory committees. She is an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

and served on the editorial board for the American Journal of Epidemiology. Before joining the National Cancer Institute, she held faculty positions at Oxford University and Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Berrington de González is also the senior advisor for strategic activities in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics. In this role, she provides advice to the director on the division research portfolio and works with the deputy director to oversee strategic planning.

Ann Bostrom, Ph.D., is the Weyerhaeuser Endowed Professor of Environmental Policy at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. From 1999 to 2001, she was the program director at the National Science Foundation for the Decision, Risk, and Management Science program. She researches risk perception, risk communication, and decision making under uncertainty, with a focus on mental models of hazardous processes. Her current research projects include interview, survey, and experimental research on perceptions, communication, and decision making about climate change, earthquake early warning, and extreme weather forecasts and warnings. Dr. Bostrom earned her Ph.D. in policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University, her M.B.A. from Western Washington University, and her B.A. in English from the University of Washington.

Casey Canfield, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in engineering management and systems engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Her research is focused on quantifying the human part of complex systems to improve decision making, particularly in the context of energy, governance, and health care. She has a Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, where she published research on behavioral interventions and risk management in the context of energy and cybersecurity. After completing her Ph.D., she spent 1.5 years as a science and technology policy fellow in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technologies Office.

Harry M. Cullings, Ph.D., was the chief of the Statistics Department at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, until 2018 and is now a consultant to RERF. He has been conducting research at RERF since 1999. RERF is a public interest foundation funded by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Dr. Cullings holds a B.S. in fundamental sciences from Lehigh University and an M.S. in medical physics and Ph.D. in analytical health sciences (biometrics) from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in radiation sciences funded by DOE

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

at the University of Pittsburgh. The emphasis of Dr. Cullings’s research is on radiation dosimetry and other aspects of radiation epidemiology, including dosimetric uncertainty and applications of spatial statistics. Dr. Cullings has published numerous reports, papers in scientific journals, and book chapters on subjects related to radiation dosimetry and radiation health effects research. He served as a member of the Joint U.S.-Japan Working Group on the Reassessment of Atomic-bomb Dosimetry, which created the Dosimetry System 2002 that is currently in use at RERF. Dr. Cullings’s research has been funded strictly through RERF, in part through a DOE award to the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Cullings has received no external research funding from government agencies, private companies, or foundations.

Lawrence T. Dauer, Ph.D., DABHP, FHPS, is an attending physicist in the Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and is their corporate radiation safety officer. He has spent more than 35 years in the field of radiation protection and health physics, including programs for the nuclear energy and industrial sectors as well as operations and research in medical health physics. His research focuses on low-dose radiation epidemiology and dosimetry, as well as improving radiation protection practices and communication avenues to reduce the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation and facilitate beneficial clinical applications. He is currently a council member and previous board member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). He is currently serving NCRP as the scientific director for the Million Person Study of Low-Level and Low-Dose-Rate Effects. He served 7 years on the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 3, Radiation Protection in Medicine, and has served on several committees for the Health Physics Society (HPS), the Greater New York Chapter of HPS, the Radiological and Medical Physics Society, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American College of Radiology, the Society for Interventional Radiology, and the Radiation Research societies. He received the Elda E. Anderson and fellow awards from HPS.

Bernard A. Harris, Jr., M.D., M.B.A., F.A.C.P., is currently the chief executive officer (CEO) and the managing partner of Vesalius Ventures, a venture capital firm that supports and invests in early to mid-stage health care technologies and companies. Dr. Harris also serves as the CEO of the National Math and Science Initiative and leads the organization’s efforts to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement in communities across the country. He has been involved in math and science education for more than 25 years through his philanthropy efforts through the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

Harris Institute/Foundation. Dr. Harris was at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for 10 years, where he conducted research in musculoskeletal physiology and disuse osteoporosis. Dr. Harris is also a former astronaut who flew on the International Space Station in 1991 and 1995 for a total of 18 days in Earth orbit. Dr. Harris earned a B.S. in biology from the University of Houston, a master of medical science from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, an M.B.A. from the University of Houston, and an M.D. from the Texas Tech University School of Medicine. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic, a National Research Council Fellowship in endocrinology at the NASA Ames Research Center, and trained as a flight surgeon at the Aerospace School of Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including nine honorary doctorates, the NASA Spaceflight Medal, the NASA Award of Merit, and the 2000 Horatio Alger Award. He is also a fellow of the American College of Physicians.

Alejandra Hurtado de Mendoza, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is a bilingual social psychologist with interdisciplinary training in anthropology and communication, culture, and technology. She aims to combine interdisciplinary approaches in social psychology, behavioral science, and communication to develop and evaluate interventions that address stark disparities in the uptake of genetic risk assessment in high-risk underserved groups. Her research focuses on translational genomics with underserved populations. She is the principal investigator of a 5-year multi-site grant to test the effect of a culturally targeted narrative video on genetic counseling and testing uptake in Latina women at risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. She is also co-leading an NINR R21 grant to adapt an Intelligent Tutoring System intervention (BRCA-Gist) to enhance the use of genetic counseling services in at-risk Latina and African American women. In her Career Award (KL2), she adapted an evidence-based telephone counseling intervention to broaden the reach and accessibility to genetic counseling for at-risk Latina women.

Jeffrey Kahn, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Andreas C. Dracopoulos Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, a position he assumed in July 2016. From 2011, he has been the inaugural Robert Henry Levi and Ryda Hecht Levi Professor of Bioethics and Public Policy. He is also a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He works in a variety of areas of bioethics, exploring the intersection of ethics and health/science policy, including human and animal research ethics, public health, and ethical issues in emerging biomedical technologies. Dr. Kahn has served on numerous

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

governmental and international advisory panels, including most recently on the International Commission on the Clinical Use of Heritable Human Genome Editing. He is currently the chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Health Sciences Policy; the chair of the National Academies’ Committee on Aerospace Medicine and Medicine of Extreme Environments; and has previously chaired its Committee on the Use of Chimpanzees in Biomedical and Behavioral Research (2011); the Committee on Ethics Principles and Guidelines for Health Standards for Long Duration and Exploration Spaceflights (2014); and the Committee on the Ethical, Social, and Policy Considerations of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques (2016). He is currently a member of the National Academy of Medicine Council.

Guillermina Lozano, Ph.D., is a geneticist recognized for her studies of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway, from characterizing p53 as a transcriptional activator to characterizing the physiological importance of Mdm2 and Mdm4 proteins as inhibitors of p53, and the consequences of p53 mutations on tumor development. Dr. Lozano completed undergraduate studies in biology and mathematics at Pan American University (now known as the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley). She completed graduate studies at Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and a postdoctoral fellowship at Princeton University. She was hired as an instructor at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in 1987 and is now the chair of the Department of Genetics. She was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received the Minorities in Cancer Research Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship and the Women in Cancer Research Charlotte Friend Lectureship awards, both from the American Association for Cancer Research. Dr. Lozano is also the recipient of distinguished alumni awards from both her undergraduate and graduate alma maters. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine.

Giovanni Parmigiani, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Data Sciences at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a professor of biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, as well as the associate director for population sciences at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. He received his undergraduate degree in economics and social sciences at Università L. Bocconi and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University. He has held faculty positions at Carnegie Mellon University, Duke University, and Johns Hopkins University. His work creates statistical tools for understanding cancer data, with particular focus on cancer risk in genetic epidemiology and genomics contexts. He pioneered the use of machine learning in the assessment of risk from inherited

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

susceptibility to cancer, developing risk assessment tools that have been in use for more than two decades. He also played a key role in early studies of somatic mutations in cancer. He is the recipient of several awards including mentoring awards at Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, and the Dana-Farber Institute.

Robert L. Satcher, Ph.D., M.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) in Houston, Texas. He specializes in the treatment of skeletal metastatic disease, soft tissue sarcoma, technology applications for improving surgical outcomes, teleoncology, and intraoperative navigation. Dr. Satcher is a former astronaut, having served as a mission specialist who visited the International Space Station. Dr. Satcher is leading institutional efforts to establish the clinical enterprise for virtual care at MDACC. Additionally, his work with MDACC’s Global Oncology enterprise is focused on building relationships with international health care partners that will lead to the construction of a Cancer Center in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Satcher co-founded the eHealth Research Institute, a collaborative endeavor among Rice University, the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, and MDACC to bring together physicians with academic and industry researchers to improve access to specialized health care using the latest in research and technology. Dr. Satcher is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American Telemedicine Association, the American Association of Cancer Research, Doctors United in Medical Missions, and the Orthopaedic Research Society.

Carol Scott-Conner, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is a professor emeritus of surgery at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. She received her B.S. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1969 and her M.D. from the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine in 1976. She remained at NYU to complete a 5-year general surgical residency in 1981. She was appointed the head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Iowa in 1995. She is the author or co-author of nine major surgical texts and a book of short stories. Her other works have included numerous papers, chapters, and presentations on a wide range of surgical topics.

Igor Shuryak, M.D., Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Center for Radiological Research in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Columbia University Medical Center. His research interests focus on mechanistic mathematical modeling of the effects of ionizing radiation on living

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

organisms. They include modeling of radiation-induced carcinogenesis at both low and high doses (e.g., second cancers induced by radiotherapy for primary malignancies), cancer therapy (e.g., tumor control and normal tissue complications), non-targeted (“bystander”) effects of radiation (e.g., for densely ionizing radiation exposures such as those occurring on manned space missions), and mechanisms of resistance to ionizing radiation in human and nonhuman cells. Dr. Shuryak’s training and experience have been interdisciplinary, starting with biology (B.A. from Columbia University) and medicine (M.D. from the State University of New York Downstate College of Medicine). He received a Ph.D. with distinction from the Department of Environmental Health Sciences (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health) for work on combining both short- and long-term time scales in mechanistic modeling of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

Gregory R. Wagner, M.D., is an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. At Harvard, he teaches about the science behind occupational and environmental policies and regulations and the process of improving health protections at work. He also chairs the Policy Working Group for the Harvard Center for Work, Health, and Wellbeing. Dr. Wagner previously served as the senior advisor to the director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 2009 to early 2012, he served as the deputy assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health, leading efforts to develop and enforce regulations protecting the health and safety of U.S. miners. He has worked closely with both the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization to stimulate and support international efforts to better recognize and prevent diseases from work and improve screening and surveillance practices. Board certified in internal medicine and public (occupational) health, Dr. Wagner has practiced rural primary care medicine and taught both medicine and public health.

Gayle E. Woloschak, Ph.D., D.Min., is currently a professor of radiation oncology at Northwestern University in Chicago and an adjunct professor of religion and science at the Lutheran School of Theology Chicago and at the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. She holds a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of Toledo (Medical College of Ohio), and a D.Min. in Eastern Christian studies from the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Her laboratory interests include molecular biology, radiation biology, and nano-biotechnology, and her science–religion fields include biological evolution, stem cell research, and ecology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Lydia B. Zablotska, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.A., is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and the Salvatore Pablo Lucia Chair in Preventive Medicine in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she serves as the leader of the occupational and environmental epidemiology area of concentration. Dr. Zablotska is a physician and an epidemiologist with extensive training and publications in radiation epidemiology, biostatistics, and risk modeling. Her research activities have focused primarily on the examination of risks of radiation exposures in various occupational and environmental settings. Dr. Zablotska’s work has clarified the field’s understanding of the effects of occupational radiation exposures on health risks of nuclear power industry workers and workers of the uranium fuel production cycle in various occupational cohorts from the United States and Canada. Dr. Zablotska serves as a director of epidemiology, biostatistics, and population health education in the medical school curriculum at UCSF and has received multiple institutional and national teaching and mentoring awards. She is the inaugural councilor for epidemiology at the Executive Council of the Radiation Research Society.

NATIONAL ACADEMIES STAFF

Rebecca English, M.P.H. (Study Director), is a senior program officer in the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She is the staff director for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration–sponsored Standing Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments. Ms. English has directed, co-directed, and staffed a number of projects at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including, most recently, Necessity, Use, and Care of Laboratory Dogs at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (2020); Temporomandibular Disorders: From Research Discoveries to Clinical Treatment (2020); Physician-Assisted Death: Scanning the Landscape: Proceedings of a Workshop (2018); and Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: Ethical, Social, and Policy Considerations (2016). She has also staffed the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation in various capacities since 2009 and worked on wide ranging projects related to the U.S. clinical trials enterprise as well as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis throughout the world. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked on health policy for Congressman Porter J. Goss (FL-14) and then for the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association. She holds an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame with a major in political science.

Ourania (Rania) Kosti, Ph.D., is a senior program officer at the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB) of the National Academies of Sciences,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Kosti’s interests within the NRSB focus on radiation health effects, and she is the principal investigator for the National Academies’ Radiation Effects Research Foundation Program that supports studies of the atomic bomb survivors in Japan. Prior to her current appointment, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, where she conducted research on biomarker development for early cancer detection using case-control epidemiological study designs. She focused primarily on prostate, breast, and liver cancers and trying to identify those individuals who are at high risk of developing malignancies. Dr. Kosti also trained at the National Cancer Institute (2005–2007). She received a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of Surrey, United Kingdom, an M.S. in molecular medicine from the University College London, and a Ph.D. in molecular endocrinology from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in London, United Kingdom.

Leah Cairns, Ph.D., is a program officer in the Board on Health Sciences Policy. Her primary interests include health policy and biomedical research. Prior to joining the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, she served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Science and Technology Policy fellow working as legislative staff for a member of Congress focusing on health policy and appropriations. Dr. Cairns also previously served as a Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies in the Policy and Global Affairs division. Dr. Cairns received her Ph.D. in biophysics from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a B.A. in biochemistry and molecular biology from Hamilton College.

Claire Giammaria, M.P.H., is an associate program officer in the Board on Health Sciences Policy for the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to coming to the National Academies, Ms. Giammaria was the research associate for the Technology and Liberty Project at the American Civil Liberties Union where she primarily worked on genetics, health care, and privacy issues. She has an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan where she studied public health policy and concentrated in public health genetics. Ms. Giammaria received her B.A. from Grinnell College where she majored in biology.

Ruth Cooper is a research associate in the Board on Health Care Services at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has worked on several National Academies projects, including studies on cancer and disability and evidence-based opioid prescribing and workshops on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

organ transplant and disability, companion animals as sentinels for environmental exposures, and diagnostic excellence in cardiac events. She has also assisted with numerous National Cancer Policy Forum workshops ranging from topics like the cancer workforce to health literacy. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Cooper spent 1 year volunteering at Open Arms Home for Children in South Africa. In addition to her experience in health policy, Ms. Cooper also has experience in Arctic science policy, having interned at the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, and has participated in three Arctic field cruises. She holds a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame in neuroscience and behavior with a minor in Mediterranean Middle Eastern studies, and is currently pursuing her master’s degree in international science and technology policy at The George Washington University.

Cyndi Trang is the manager of internal communications and program support in the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to this role, Ms. Trang was a research associate for the Board on Health Care Services. She has worked on several National Academies projects, including studies on sickle cell disease, evidence-based opioid prescribing, and primary care implementation and workshops on veterans’ health access and diagnostic excellence in sepsis. She has also assisted with numerous National Cancer Policy Forum workshops ranging from such topics as cancer care in low-resource areas to patient navigation in cancer care. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Trang was a cancer research fellow at the National Cancer Institute, where she worked in the Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory. In addition to her experience in public health policy and laboratory research, Ms. Trang also has experience in the medical field as a former chief scribe at Novant Health. She graduated as an Honors Program Scholar from Marymount University. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree in patient safety and health care quality at Johns Hopkins University.

Kendall Logan is a senior program assistant for the Health and Medicine Division’s (HMD’s) Board on Health Sciences Policy. She joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2018 and staffed two consensus studies: Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults: Opportunities for the Health Care System and Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. She also supports the standing committee on Medical and Epidemiological Aspects of Air Pollution on U.S. Government Employees and Their Families. Ms. Logan received her B.A. in anthropology with a public health minor from Haverford College and is currently pursuing an M.P.H. from Columbia University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Michael K. Zierler, Ph.D., is the founder and the co-owner of RedOx Scientific Editing, a small shop that provides developmental editing and related editorial and writing services. He has an undergraduate degree in biology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in biology from Johns Hopkins University, where he worked on the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, stockpiling of DNA polymerases during embryogenesis, and intramolecular movements in hemoglobin studied using hydrogen exchange. Prior to graduate school, he worked for a cardiothoracic surgeon at the West Roxbury Veterans Affairs Medical Center, doing research in the laboratory and the operating room on monitoring and improving the physiology of the heart during open heart surgery using mass spectrometry and a miniaturized pH electrode. After graduate school, he completed a postdoctoral position at The State University of New York, Stony Brook, helping to identify the molecular components of the Salmonella injectisome, a bacterial invasion system. He has taught biological sciences at the high school and college levels. He has also served as the deputy mayor and the chair of the planning board in his hometown of New Paltz, New York.

Sharyl Nass, Ph.D., serves as the senior director of the Board on Health Care Services and the director of the National Cancer Policy Forum (NCPF) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. To enable the best possible care for all patients, the board undertakes scholarly analysis of the organization, financing, effectiveness, workforce, and delivery of health care, with emphasis on quality, cost, and accessibility. NCPF examines policy issues pertaining to the entire continuum of cancer research and care. For more than two decades, Dr. Nass has worked on a broad range of health and science policy topics that includes the quality and safety of health care and clinical trials, developing technologies for precision medicine, and strategies for large-scale biomedical science. She has a Ph.D. in cell biology from Georgetown University and undertook postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as a research fellowship at the Max Planck Institute in Germany. She also holds a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has been the recipient of the Cecil Medal for Excellence in Health Policy Research, a Distinguished Service Award from the National Academies, and the Institute of Medicine staff team achievement award (as team leader).

Andrew M. Pope, Ph.D., is the senior director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy. He has a Ph.D. in physiology and biochemistry from the University of Maryland and has been a member of the National Academies

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine staff since 1982 and the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) staff since 1989. His primary interests are science policy, biomedical ethics, and environmental and occupational influences on human health. During his tenure at the National Academies, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers to the protection of human subjects of research, National Institutes of Health priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Since 1998, Dr. Pope has served as the director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy, which oversees and guides a program of activities that is intended to encourage and sustain the continuous vigor of the basic biomedical and clinical research enterprises needed to ensure and improve the health and resilience of the public. On-going activities include Forums on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders; Genomics; Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation; and Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events. Dr. Pope is the recipient of HMD’s Cecil Award and the National Academy of Sciences’ President’s Special Achievement Award.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Page 123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×
Page 124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×
Page 125
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×
Page 126
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26155.
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Page 128
Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks Get This Book
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Astronauts face unique health-related risks during crewed space missions, and longer-duration missions that extend to greater distances in our solar system (including to the Moon and Mars) will likely increase those risks. Cancer risks due to ionizing radiation exposure are one of these health-related risks. Assessing, managing, and communicating radiation-induced cancer risks associated with spaceflight are challenging because of incomplete knowledge of the radiation environment in space, limited data on radiation-induced cellular damage mechanisms, lack of direct observations from epidemiological studies, and the complexities of understanding radiation risk.

At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), an ad hoc committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened to provide advice on NASA's proposed updates to their space radiation health standard, which sets the allowable limit of space radiation exposure throughout the course of an astronaut's career. Space Radiation and Astronaut Health: Managing and Communicating Cancer Risks provides the committee's recommendations and conclusions regarding the updated space radiation health standard, NASA's radiation risk communication strategies, and a process for developing an ethics-informed waiver protocol for long-duration spaceflight missions.

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