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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
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Appendix

Committee Biographical Sketches

Robert Rosner (Chair)

Robert Rosner has been a theoretical physicist at the University of Chicago since 1987, where he is the William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics, as well as in the Enrico Fermi Institute and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies. He served as Argonne National Laboratory’s Chief Scientist and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical, Biological and Computational Sciences (2002-2005), and was Argonne’s Laboratory Director from 2005 to 2009. He was the founding chair of the Department of Energy’s National Laboratory Directors’ Council (2007-2009). His degrees are all in physics (B.A., Brandeis University; Ph.D., Harvard University). He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and to the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (as a Foreign Member) in 2004; he is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Most of his scientific work has been related to fluid dynamics and plasma physics problems, as well as in applied mathematics and computational physics, especially in the development of modem high-performance computer simulation tools, with a particular interest in complex systems (ranging from astrophysical systems to nuclear fission reactors). Dr. Rosner has previously served on over a dozen Academies study committees, including the Committee to Review the Quality of the Management and of the Science and Engineering Research at the Department of Energy National Security Laboratories and the Committee on Evaluation of the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainty Methodology Applied to the Certification of the Nation’s Nuclear Weapons Stockpile. Recently, he has been increasingly involved in energy technologies, and in the public policy issues that relate to the development and deployment of various energy production and consumption technologies, including especially nuclear energy, the electrification of transport, and energy use in urban environments. He is the co-founding director of the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago, located at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, Booth School of Business, and Social Sciences Division of the University of Chicago.

Marvin L. Adams

Marvin L. Adams is the HTRI Professor of Nuclear Engineering and director of the Institute for National Security Education and Research at Texas A&M University. Dr. Adams received his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Michigan and is a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. He was a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1986 to 1992 and has remained extensively engaged with the U.S. national security laboratories since then. He has served on a variety of review and advisory committees and panels, many of which advise the U.S. government on matters related to national security. Dr. Adams has served on several Academies committees including the Committee on Technical Issues Related to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the Committee on Sustaining and Improving the Nation’s Nuclear Forensics Capabilities, and the Committee on Evaluation of Quantification of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×

Margins and Uncertainty Methodology Applied to the Certification of the Nation’s Nuclear Weapons Stockpile. He has also served as Co-chair of the Committee on Mathematical Foundations of Validation, Verification, and Uncertainty Quantification. Dr. Adams currently serves as a member of the National Academies Committee on International Security and Arms Control.

Sue B. Clark

Sue B. Clark is a Regents Distinguished Professor of Chemistry with tenure at Washington State University(WSU) in Pullman, Washington, and Battelle Fellow with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this joint appointment, she is currently serving as the Chief Science and Technology Officer in the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate, where she stewards discretionary research investments within the directorate and leads research focused on the chemistry and chemical engineering of processing nuclear materials and associated environmental impacts. Her current research areas include chemistry of radioactive waste systems, environmental chemistry, actinide separations, and radioanalytical chemistry. She began her academic career at WSU in the Chemistry Department in 1996 as an assistant professor and served as Department Chair (August 2005 to December 2007). She also served as Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at WSU’s Tri-Cities campus in 2008 and Interim Dean of the College of Sciences (WSU system- wide) in 2010. Previously, she was a member of the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, appointed by President Barack Obama (2011-2014). Clark is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Chemical Society (ACS), and she is the recipient of the ACS 2020 Glenn T. Seaborg award and the 2012 Olin-Garvan Medal. She is also an elected member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences. She was elected a member of the Governing Board for the U.S. Council for Chemical Research, serving as a board member from 2015 to 2020. She also served on the National Academies’ Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board from 2004 to 2009, and as a member of many National Academies study committees. She serves on the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Energy, and has served as a consultant to Battelle Memorial Institute and the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers. Dr. Clark holds a B.S. in chemistry from Lander College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from Florida State University.

Donald L. Cook

Donald L. Cook served as the Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) from 2010 to 2015. He was responsible for managing the U.S. nuclear security enterprise of laboratories and manufacturing facilities. Prior to his appointment to NNSA, Dr. Cook served as managing director and chief executive officer of the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom from 2006 to 2009. In this capacity, he was accountable for AWE’s performance on the contract with the UK Ministry of Defence, which includes support of the UK Trident warheads and development and sustainment of capability in nuclear weapon design, engineering development, manufacturing, qualification, assembly, transport, support in service, and finally, decommissioning, dismantlement, and disposal. From 1977 to 2005, Dr. Cook worked in Pulsed Power Sciences, Microtechnologies, Infrastructure, and Security at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. From 1999 to 2005, he was director of the Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA) Program Center, accountable for design and construction of the MESA complex. In 2003, he assumed program director responsibilities for Sandia’s Infrastructure Program and for Sandia’s Safeguards

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×

and Security Technologies Program. Dr. Cook previously led efforts in pulsed power accelerator design and experimentation, fusion research, hydrodynamics, radiography, diagnostic development, and computational code development. Work during this period included construction and development of a number of accelerators, including the Z-machine. Dr. Cook is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Institute of Physics.

Donald J. DePaolo

Don J. DePaolo received his Ph.D. in geology from Caltech in 1978, and has been a professor of geochemistry and geology at the University of California, Los Angeles (1978-1988) and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) (1988-2016). He is currently graduate professor of geochemistry and Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus at U.C. Berkeley. He served as chair of the Department of Geology and Geophysics at UC Berkeley, and was director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Earth Sciences Division. From 2010 to 2016 he was Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences at LBNL. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served on numerous advisory and study committees for federal agencies, universities, and the National Academies. His research involves the use of isotopic measurements as tracers and chronometers of Earth processes. From 2009 through 2018 he was the director of the Center for Nanoscale Controls of Geologic CO2, a U.S. DOE Energy Frontier Research Center led by LBNL.

Michael Dunning

Michael Dunning retired from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2018, where he was principal deputy principal associate director of Weapons and Complex Integration. Prior to this role, Dr. Dunning was the program director and division leader for Primary Nuclear Design (PND). Under his leadership, PND operated a large-scale experimental facility at Site 300 and LLNL’s High Explosives Applications Facility—both of which are national resources for the study of high explosives, conventional munitions, and propellants. PND also maintained a vigorous code-development and simulation capability, using some of the world’s most capable supercomputers. Prior to 2006, Dr. Dunning served as the Nevada Experiments and Operations Program Leader and was responsible for the LLNL program and operations executed at the Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada Nuclear Security Site). Dr. Dunning also led LLNL efforts to detect, assess, and disable unauthorized nuclear and radiological dispersal devices. Dr. Dunning joined the Laboratory in 1989 as a postdoctoral researcher. He completed his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in nuclear engineering at the University of Michigan.

Steven Fetter

Steve Fetter is Associate Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, and professor of public policy at the University of Maryland. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Fetter worked for five years in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy during the Obama administration, leading both the National Security and International Affairs and the Environment and Energy divisions. In 1993-1994 he served as special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy and he worked in the State Department as an American Institute of Physics fellow. He has been a member of the Director of National Intelligence’s Intelligence Science Board and the Department of Energy’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee; served as president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs and as vice chairman of the Federation of American Scientists; and has been a visiting fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation, Harvard University’s Center for Science and International Affairs, Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Plasma Fusion Center, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He holds an S.B. in physics from MIT and a Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley.

Benjamin C. Garrett

Prior to retiring in January 2015, Benjamin C. Garrett was assigned to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory Division, Forensic Response Section, Quantico, Virginia. He had been appointed to the Senior Level Executive Service in July 2005 and served as the FBI’s senior scientist for operational response to crimes or incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. As a member of the FBI Laboratory executive management, Dr. Garrett assisted with advancing the FBI’s methods for crime scene processing and for examining evidence contaminated by toxic chemicals, biological pathogens, and radiological and nuclear materials. In addition to his responsibilities in the FBI Laboratory Division, Dr. Garrett has served as an instructor for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for its Workshop on Radiological Crime Scene Management and Nuclear Forensics and in a similar capacity with INTERPOL, the international policing organization. He guided the development of the Implementing Guide for Radiological Crime Scene Management, issued in November 2014 by the IAEA and published jointly by the IAEA, INTERPOL, and the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute. From 2009 to 2014, he served as the co-chairman of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group. He holds a B.S. from Davidson College and a Ph.D. from Emory University.

Laura S. H. Holgate

Laura S. H. Holgate, Ambassador (retired), is currently Vice President for Materials Risk Management at the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), a nongovernmental organization dedicated to preventing catastrophic attacks with weapons of mass destruction and disruption—nuclear, biological, radiological, and cyber. She is also co-founder of Gender Champions in Nuclear Policy, a project of NTI. Ambassador Holgate leads NTI’s efforts related to securing and reducing highly enriched uranium, plutonium, and radiological sources, as well as nuclear cooperation with Russia, Central Asia, and other countries. She served as U.S. Ambassador to the Vienna Office of the United Nations and the International Atomic Agency, where she implemented U.S. policy on nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear security, verification of the Iran Deal, nuclear testing, counterterrorism, anti-corruption, drug policy, export control, and the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Ambassador Holgate was previously the special assistant to the president and senior director for weapons of mass destruction terrorism and threat reduction on the U.S. National Security Council. In this role, she oversaw and coordinated the development of national policies and programs to reduce global threats from nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons; detect, identify, secure, and eliminate nuclear materials; prevent malicious use of biotechnology; and secure the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. She was also the U.S. Sherpa to the Nuclear Security Summits and co-led the effort to advance the President’s Global Health Security Agenda. Prior to that, she held senior positions at NTI and the Departments of Energy and Defense. Ambassador Holgate graduated from Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was a researcher at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×

Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, where she is now a senior non-resident fellow. She serves on several advisory boards and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

William Jeffrey

William Jeffrey, Ph.D., is chief executive officer of SRI International, a leading research and development organization serving government and industry. Jeffrey joined SRI in 2014. From 2008 to 2014, Dr. Jeffrey was president and CEO of HRL Laboratories, a corporate research and development organization owned by The Boeing Company and General Motors. Prior to joining HRL, Dr. Jeffrey served in the George W. Bush administration as director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He also served in the Executive Office of the President as senior director for homeland and national security and as assistant director for space and aeronautics within the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Earlier in his career, Dr. Jeffrey was deputy director for the Advanced Technology Office and chief scientist for the Tactical Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and assistant deputy for technology at the Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office. Dr. Jeffrey started his professional career at the Institute for Defense Analyses. He is an elected Fellow of the American Physical Society, an elected Honorary Member of the International Society of Automation, a recipient of the 2008 Navigator Award from the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, and a recipient of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service. Dr. Jeffrey serves on the board of TE Connectivity, and serves on the Office of Director of National Intelligence Technical Advisory Board. He previously served on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory External Review Committee. Dr. Jeffrey received his M.A. and Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University, and his B.Sc. in physics is from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Jenifer Shafer

Jenifer Shafer is an associate professor in the Chemistry Department and Nuclear Science and Engineering Program at the Colorado School of Mines. She received her Ph.D. from Washington State University in 2010, and a B.S. from Colorado State University in 2005. She is the 2019 Chair of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Nuclear Science and Technology, a 2014 Department of Energy Early Career awardee and a member of the 2017 ACS Industrial and Engineering Committee Research’s Class of Influential Researchers. Jenifer is interested in advancing f-element separations technology through the use of new materials, supramolecular assembly, unique oxidation states, and controlling electronic structure. Advancing f-element separations technology has broad applications from advanced nuclear fuel cycles, nuclear forensics, and renewable technology. She is the coauthor of several book chapters, over 40 technical manuscripts, and has led or collaborated on projects receiving approximately $7 million in funding for her work in these areas.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
Page 38
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence: Public Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26167.
×
Page 40
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Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials, devices, emissions, and signals to determine the origin and history of those nuclear materials and devices. At the request of the Secretary of Energy, and in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Homeland Security, Restoring and Improving Nuclear Forensics to Support Attribution and Deterrence evaluates the U.S. government's nuclear forensics capabilities. A 2010 National Academies report, Nuclear Forensics: A Capability at Risk, characterized the precarious state of the national technical nuclear forensics (NTNF) program at that time: NTNF relied almost entirely on staff dedicated to and residual funding from other related programs. This summary report addresses the current state of U.S. NTNF capabilities relative to the National Academies evaluation in 2010 and recommends ways to improve the NTNF program through improvements in policy, operations, and research and development efforts.

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