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Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences (2021)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
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Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Tia Powell (Chair) is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics, holds the Shoshannah Trachtenberg Frackman chair in medical ethics, and is professor of epidemiology and psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Powell focuses on bioethics issues related to public policy, dementia, consultation, end-of-life care, the LGBT population, and public health disasters. She served 4 years as executive director of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, which functions as New York State’s bioethics commission. Powell has worked with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on many projects and has also worked with the Centers for Disease Control, New York state and city, and professional organizations on issues related to public health ethics and disasters. She is a member of the American Psychiatric Association ethics committee, and a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine and the Hastings Center. She is the author of Dementia Reimagined: Building a Life of Joy and Dignity from Beginning to End, published by Penguin Random House. Powell received a B.A. from Harvard College and an M.D. from Yale Medical School.

Karen S. Cook (Vice Chair) is Ray Lyman Wilbur professor of sociology, director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and former vice provost for faculty development and diversity at Stanford University. She conducts research on social interaction, social networks, social exchange, and trust. She has served on a number of National Academy of Sciences

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

(NAS) consensus study committees including on risk, voting, adult education, science communication, and security. She has also served on the NAS Council and is currently chair of Class V. She is also a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation in New York. Cook was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996 and to NAS in 2007. In 2004, she received the American Sociological Association Social Psychology Section’s Cooley Mead Award for Career Contributions to Social Psychology. Cook received a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University.

Margarita Alegría is chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and a professor in the departments of medicine and psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Her research is focused on the improvement of health care services delivery for diverse racial and ethnic populations, conceptual and methodological issues with multicultural populations, and ways to bring the community’s perspective into the design and implementation of health services. Alegría is currently the principal investigator of four National Institutes of Health–funded research studies: The Impact of Medicaid Plans on Access to and Quality of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Treatment, Building Community Capacity for Disability Prevention for Minority Elders, Building Infrastructure for Community Capacity in Accelerating Integrated Care, and Latino Youths Coping with Discrimination: A Multi-Level Investigation in Micro- and Macro-Time. In 2011, she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Medicine in acknowledgment of her scientific contributions to her field. Alegría has also received notable awards, including most recently the 2020 Rema Lapouse Award for Achievement in Epidemiology, Mental Health, and Applied Public Health Statistics by the American Public Health Association. She obtained a B.A. in psychology from Georgetown University in 1978 and a Ph.D. from Temple University in 1989.

Deborah Blacker is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and deputy chair and professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH). She is a geriatric psychiatrist and epidemiologist based at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she directs the Gerontology Research Unit and serves as associate chief for research in the Department of Psychiatry. Blacker’s work is focused on the epidemiology, genetics, assessment, and early recognition of Alzheimer’s disease. She serves as leader of the Research Education Component and coleader of the Clinical Core for the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, and as leader of the Analytic Core for the Harvard Aging Brain Study. Blacker is involved in multiple local and national studies regarding Alzheimer’s disease genetics and epidemiology, and leads the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

AlzRisk project to develop a curated online catalog of studies on the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. She is also actively involved in teaching and methodological research at HSPH, where she codirects a training program in psychiatric genetics and translational research, and teaches a course on assessment methods in psychiatric research. Blacker served on the Neurocognitive Disorders Workgroup for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the American Psychiatric Association’s Workgroup to Revise the Practice Guideline for Dementia. She received an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an Sc.D. in epidemiology from HSPH.

M. Maria Glymour is a professor in the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and currently serves as director for the UCSF Ph.D. program in epidemiology and translational science. She coleads a National Institutes of Health–sponsored training grant on aging and chronic disease, and coleads the Methods for Longitudinal Studies in Dementia initiative to improve research methods related to cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. Glymour’s research is focused on how social factors experienced across the life course (from infancy to adulthood) influence cognitive function, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, stroke, and other health outcomes in late life. She is especially interested in how exposures amenable to policy interventions shape health. Another line of her work is focused on strengthening quantitative methods for research on cognitive aging and ADRD. Specific topics have included the geographic patterning of stroke and dementia, the socioeconomic inequalities in healthy aging, the causal effects of education on later-life health, the influence of selection and survival biases in models of cognitive aging, life-course timing of dementia risk factors, and longitudinal modeling of cognitive change and dementia. Prior to joining UCSF, Glymour was an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. She completed an Sc.D. at the Harvard School of Public Health and postdoctoral training at Columbia University.

Roee Gutman is an associate professor of biostatistics at Brown University. His areas of research interest are Bayesian data analysis, missing data, file linkage, causal inference, matching, and bioinformatics. Gutman has been and continues to be involved in many comparative effectiveness studies, in which he contributes in terms of both statistical theory and its implementation. He brings vast experience in analyzing many types of secondary datasets from various sources (e.g., Medicare claims data, registries, Veteran’s Affairs health data), as well as data collected through large pragmatic cluster randomized trials. Gutman received a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

Mark D. Hayward is a professor of sociology, Centennial Commission professor in the liberal arts, and a faculty research associate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Recently, he began a collaborative National Institute on Aging–supported project with Eileen Crimmins, examining trends and disparities in the dementia experience of the older U.S. population. At its core, this study is designed to inform our understanding of how education—a crucial Alzheimer’s disease risk factor—influences the cognitive health of older Americans. Hayward has served with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Population. He was chair of The Future Directions for the Demography of Aging: A Workshop and also was a member of the Committee on Accounting for Socioeconomic Status in Medicare Payment Programs. He received a Ph.D. in sociology from Indiana University.

Ruth Katz is senior vice president for public policy at LeadingAge, the nation’s largest association representing not-for-profit providers of aging services. She joined LeadingAge in January 2018, after a 27-year career in the Office of the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). For the past 20 years, Katz served as the senior career official in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). She is a trusted leader, coalition builder, research translator, and policy influencer, known for leading teams that work on—and seek to be a nexus between—policy analysis and research. At ASPE, Katz led the founding and operation of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act Advisory Council, and she led the creation of the first national plan and updates that followed. She also led the convening of the ASPE/National Institutes of Health Research Summit on social science research on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Katz was the staff leader for the HHS early implementation work on the Community Living Assistance Services and Supports (CLASS) Act program and led the drafting of the report to repeal CLASS. She oversaw numerous policy research projects on aging, disability, long-term care, and mental health topics, and served on secretarial work groups, including those responding to the opioid crisis. She received an M.Ed. from The George Washington University.

Spero M. Manson (Pembina Chippewa) is a distinguished professor of public health and psychiatry, occupies the Colorado Trust Chair in American Indian Health, and directs the Centers for American Indian & Alaska Native Health in the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. His programs include 10 national centers, which pursue research, program development, training, and collaboration with 250 Native communities, spanning rural, reservation, urban, and village settings across the country. Manson has acquired $250 million

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

in sponsored research to support this work and published more than 250 articles on the assessment, epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of physical, alcohol, drug, and mental health problems over the developmental life span of Native people. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2002, and he is widely acknowledged as one of the nation’s leading authorities in regard to Indian and Native health. Manson received a Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of Minnesota.

Terrie E. Moffitt is the Nannerl O. Keohane university professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University and a professor of social development at King’s College London. She studies how genetic and environmental risks together shape the developmental course of problem behaviors. While her initial interest was in antisocial, violent, and criminal behavior, Moffitt now also studies mental health and substance abuse, including how mental health and brain function affect the body’s physical health and aging. She is working on testing whether chronic psychiatric disorders and lifelong poor cognitive abilities accelerate the pace of aging. Moffitt codirects the Dunedin Longitudinal Study, which has followed 1,000 people born in 1972 in New Zealand from birth to age 45. She also codirects the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, which has followed 1,100 British families with twins born in 1994–1995 from birth to age 24. Moffitt is a trustee of the Nuffield Foundation and a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, the American Society of Criminology, the British Academy, the American Psychopathological Association, Academia Europaea, the American Academy of Political & Social Science, the Association for Psychological Science, and King’s College London. She has served with investigative panels for such institutions as the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the National Academy of Sciences. Moffitt received a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Southern California.

Vincent Mor is Florence Price Grant professor of community health in the Brown University School of Public Health and a research health scientist at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He was on the faculty of the Department of Community Health in the Brown Medical School from 1981 until it became the Department of Health Services, Policy, and Practice in the School of Public Health. Mor was tenured in 1987 and promoted to professor in 1990. He helped found the department’s graduate program in 1986 and directed the Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research for 10 years. He served as chair of the Department of Community Health from 1996 to 2010. As chair, he instituted an expansion of the department’s graduate programs, growing the doctoral programs in epidemiology and biostatistics, and adding a Ph.D. program in health services research. His work has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

since 1984. He has held a MERIT award from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), has been a Robert Wood Johnson health policy investigator, and was awarded the Distinguished Investigator award from Academy-Health. He currently directs an NIA-funded program project on long-term care services and supports in America. He received a Ph.D. at the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in social welfare at Brandeis University.

David B. Reuben is director of the Multicampus Program in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology and chief of the Division of Geriatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for Health Sciences. He is chair of the Archstone Foundation, professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and director of the UCLA Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Program. Reuben is past president of the American Geriatrics Society and former board chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine. In 2012, he received one of the first Innovation Challenge awards from the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation to develop a model program for providing comprehensive, coordinated care for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. In 2014, Reuben was one of three principal investigators to be awarded a grant for a multicenter clinical trial (the STRIDE study) by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to reduce serious fall-related injuries; it is the largest grant that PCORI has awarded. In 2018, he was awarded a multisite PCORI- and NIA-funded pragmatic trial to compare the effectiveness of health system–based versus community-based versus usual dementia care. Reuben continues to provide primary care for frail older persons, including making house calls. He received an M.D. from the Emory University School of Medicine.

Roland J. Thorpe Jr. is an associate professor in the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the John Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health; founding director of the Program for Research in Men’s Health in the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions (HCHDS); deputy director of the HCHDS; and director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Resource Center for Minority Aging Research. He holds joint appointments in the divisions of geriatric medicine and gerontology and in neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and in the undergraduate program in public health in the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences. Thorpe’s research is focused on functional and health status disparities related to race, place, and socioeconomic status across the life course of community-dwelling adults with a focus on African American men. Most of his work has been funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. Thorpe has published in various outlets including the Journal of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

Gerontology: Medical Sciences, Social Science & Medicine, the American Journal of Public Health, and Biodemography and Social Biology. He is a member of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and recently completed a 4-year term on the Advisory Committee on Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Thorpe earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Purdue University.

Rachel M. Werner is Robert D. Eilers professor, health care management and economics, and is executive director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, both at the University of Pennsylvania. She is an internationally recognized expert in health economics and health policy, particularly how provider payment and financial incentives affect the care of older adults. Werner’s research has been published in high-impact, peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of the American Medical Association, the New England Journal of Medicine, and Health Affairs. Beyond publication, she has influenced policy as a member of numerous national committees and as an advisor to the federal government on quality measurement and quality improvement incentives. In a particularly policy-relevant study, she found that a five-star rating system has a much greater effect on consumer choice of nursing home than more complicated measures of quality. She is a core investigator with the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion and directed one of four national centers to evaluate the effectiveness of VHA’s medical home model. She has received numerous awards for her work, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Federation for Medical Research. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2018. She received an M.D. and a Ph.D. in health economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Kristine Yaffe is a professor of psychiatry, neurology, and epidemiology; the Roy and Marie Scola endowed chair and vice chair of research in psychiatry; and the director of the Center for Population Brain Health at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of cognitive aging and dementia. As principal investigator of multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Defense, and several foundations, Yaffe is particularly interested in identifying novel risk factors for cognitive impairment that may lead to strategies for preventing cognitive decline. She has published more than 500 peer-reviewed articles in numerous prestigious journals including The Lancet, The British Medical Journal, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and The New England Journal of Medicine. Yaffe served as cochair of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Cognitive Aging, which released a report in 2015 entitled Cognitive Aging:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

Progress in Understanding and Opportunities for Action. She is currently a member of the Beeson Scientific Advisory Board and the Global Council on Brain Health and has received several awards for her distinguished scholarly work, including the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry’s Distinguished Scientist Award and the American Academy of Neurology’s Potamkin Prize for Alzheimer’s Research. Yaffe completed postdoctoral training in epidemiology and geriatric psychiatry at UCSF. She received a B.S. in biology-psychology from Yale University and an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Julie M. Zissimopoulos is an associate professor in the Sol Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California (USC). In addition to her faculty appointment, she serves as director of the Aging and Cognition Research Program and Research Training at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. She is director of USC’s Resource Center for Minority Aging Research, and Center for Advancing Sociodemographic and Economic Study of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias, both focused on reducing the burden of Alzheimer’s disease and funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Her research applies insights and methods from economics to several health policy areas, such as racial and ethnic disparities in dementia risk and health care and costs of Alzheimer’s disease, medical expenditures, caregiving, and financial support between generations of family members. Zissimopoulos currently leads an NIA-funded research project on the use of and response to drug therapies for non-Alzheimer’s disease conditions that influence risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and racial and ethnic disparities in health care treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Her recently published research appears in numerous publications, including JAMA Neurology, the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, Daedalus—Journal of the American Academy of Arts & Science, and the Journal of Health Economics. She received a B.A., summa cum laude, from Boston College; an M.A. from Columbia University; and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

ADVISORY PANEL TO THE COMMITTEE

Cynthia Huling Hummel recently completed a term of service as a member of the National Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services. She has served as a national early-stage advisor for the Alzheimer’s Association. She presented at the 2017 and 2019 National Institutes of Health Alzheimer’s Research Summits and has given many other talks in her role as an advocate. Huling Hummel is also active on a local level, co-leading a respite care group called “Faithful Friends” and serving on a local committee that plans social programs for those with Alzheimer’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

disease and related dementias. She is especially interested in Alzheimer’s research and enrolled in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study in 2010. A retired pastor, Huling Hummel speaks to faith communities about offering dementia friendly programs and services. She received a B.S. from Rutgers College, an M.Div. from New Brunswick Theological Seminary, and a D.Min. from McCormick Theological Seminary.

Marie Martinez Israelite serves as director of victim services at the Human Trafficking Institute. She previously served as chief of the Victim Assistance Program at Homeland Security Investigations, where she directed policy efforts; program development; and victim services for all federal crime victims, including survivors of human trafficking and child exploitation. Israelite has held several positions within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Department of Justice related to human trafficking, sexual assault, and domestic violence prevention and services. Most recently, she served as a senior program manager with ICF, where she facilitated the work of the U.S. Advisory Council on Human Trafficking. Her mother, a retired pediatrician, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2017, and Israelite shares caregiving responsibilities with her mother’s younger sister and her brothers. She received a B.A. from Bucknell University and an M.S.W. from the University of Pennsylvania.

John-Richard (JR) Pagan is a disabled veteran with a background in marriage and family therapy. In 2012, he began a doctorate degree in clinical psychology; 1 year into the program, at age 47, he began to suffer cognitive challenges that interfered with his studies. Although Pagan received a diagnosis that included mild cognitive impairment and sudden-onset adult attention deficit disorder, he was dismissed from the program. At this time, Veterans Affairs medical doctors have only been able to definitively diagnose his condition as a progressive neurodegenerative disease with moderate cognitive impairments in processing, language, and attention, thus meeting the requirements for early-stage dementia with additional symptoms relating to mobility and autonomic dysfunction. Pagan continues to advocate for his own health and the health of others who live with Lewy body dementia and other dementias. He is active in his spiritual and social community, and often describes his immediate family as the most vital part of his ongoing support team.

Edward Patterson was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2018 at the age of 71. Patterson, who formerly worked in the financial sales industry, states that it was his husband who first started noticing changes in his cognition. The first warning signs were difficulty completing stressful tasks, such as making airline reservations, and episodes of repetition. His husband

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×

also noticed that his mood was affected—he seemed to have a short fuse and quick mood swings. Patterson brought up the issue with his doctor, and after receiving an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, stayed home and did not talk much to others about what was going on. Eventually, he started looking for information and resources related to Alzheimer’s and came across individuals living with the disease speaking publicly about their experience. “Their messages woke me up, and got me going,” Patterson says. He “went public” with his diagnosis on Facebook and joined the Florida Gulf Coast chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, where he is involved in advocacy, fundraising, and programming.

Brian Van Buren is an Alzheimer’s advocate and public speaker, a board member of the Western Carolina Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, and an advisory council member for the Dementia Action Alliance. He was diagnosed in 2015 with early-onset Alzheimer’s, and he was a caretaker for his mother, who died in January from Alzheimer’s. After losing his job as an international flight attendant, Van Buren reimagined himself as an advocate, giving his voice to Alzheimer’s. As an African American man, he felt he needed to give a face to the disease, and he seeks to address marginalized and LGBTQ communities. He was featured in a video for AARP’s announcement presenting $60 million to fund dementia research.

Geraldine Woolfolk, a retired teacher, has had decades of experience as a caregiver for her father, her mother, and then her husband, who developed early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. As an adult education teacher for almost 25 years, she held leadership roles in the development and delivery of programs specifically designed for people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), as well as for their families. Woolfolk continues to be active with ADRD support groups, forums, and conferences. She provides information, referrals, and presentations for individuals, families, and groups dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and she advocates at all levels of government. Woolfolk has lobbied legislators and policy makers for increased funding for ADRD research and caregiver support projects that will enable families to keep their loved ones in the home environment and out of institutional settings for as long as possible. In 2011, Woolfolk was appointed to the first National Alzheimer’s Project Act Advisory Council, on which she served for 6 years. She has a B.A. in music and an MPA.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee and Advisory Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America: A Decadal Survey of the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26175.
×
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As the largest generation in U.S. history - the population born in the two decades immediately following World War II - enters the age of risk for cognitive impairment, growing numbers of people will experience dementia (including Alzheimer's disease and related dementias). By one estimate, nearly 14 million people in the United States will be living with dementia by 2060. Like other hardships, the experience of living with dementia can bring unexpected moments of intimacy, growth, and compassion, but these diseases also affect people's capacity to work and carry out other activities and alter their relationships with loved ones, friends, and coworkers. Those who live with and care for individuals experiencing these diseases face challenges that include physical and emotional stress, difficult changes and losses in their relationships with life partners, loss of income, and interrupted connections to other activities and friends. From a societal perspective, these diseases place substantial demands on communities and on the institutions and government entities that support people living with dementia and their families, including the health care system, the providers of direct care, and others.

Nevertheless, research in the social and behavioral sciences points to possibilities for preventing or slowing the development of dementia and for substantially reducing its social and economic impacts. At the request of the National Institute on Aging of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America assesses the contributions of research in the social and behavioral sciences and identifies a research agenda for the coming decade. This report offers a blueprint for the next decade of behavioral and social science research to reduce the negative impact of dementia for America's diverse population. Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America calls for research that addresses the causes and solutions for disparities in both developing dementia and receiving adequate treatment and support. It calls for research that sets goals meaningful not just for scientists but for people living with dementia and those who support them as well.

By 2030, an estimated 8.5 million Americans will have Alzheimer's disease and many more will have other forms of dementia. Through identifying priorities social and behavioral science research and recommending ways in which they can be pursued in a coordinated fashion, Reducing the Impact of Dementia in America will help produce research that improves the lives of all those affected by dementia.

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