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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Statement of Task and Completion Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Necessary DoD Range Capabilities to Ensure Operational Superiority of U.S. Defense Systems: Testing for the Future Fight. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26181.
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Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Statement of Task and Completion Matrix." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Necessary DoD Range Capabilities to Ensure Operational Superiority of U.S. Defense Systems: Testing for the Future Fight. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26181.
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Page 79

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A Statement of Task and Completion Matrix The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will convene an ad hoc committee to assess the physical and technical suitability of the Department of Defense's (DoD) ranges, infrastructures, and tools used for test and evaluation (T&E) of military systems’ operational effectiveness, suitability, survivability, and lethality across all domains (land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace). Specifically, the committee will: 1. Assess the aggregate physical suitability of DoD's ranges to include their testing capacity, the condition of their infrastructure, security measures, and encroachment challenges. 2. Assess the technical suitability of ranges to include spectrum management, instrumentation, cyber and analytics tools, and their modeling and simulation capacity. 3. Evaluate the following attributes for each range:  Physical Attributes of Range: Do ranges allow for full exercise of tested systems in the manner they will be used to achieve their mission?  Electromagnetic Attributes of Range: Can the system under test, and emulated threats to the system, access and utilize spectrum as designed and needed?  Range Infrastructure: Can range instrumentation properly and fully assess system performance and record test data (as well as training data that could be applied to T&E requirements)? Can range tools adequately process and transmit test data and efficiently provide test results?  Test Infrastructure Security: How secure are ranges, infrastructure and test capabilities against physical and cyber intrusion that could lead to exploitation of weapon systems performance data by an adversary?  Encroachment Threats and Impacts: What are the existing and potential future encroachment threats and impacts (physical space, spectrum, alternative/competing DoD uses)? 4. The committee will recommend how DoD can address and/or mitigate any existing or anticipated deficiencies, and test and evaluate future technologies anticipated to arrive between now and 2035, including discussion of planning and resource allocation for the overall test range enterprise. These technologies include, but are not limited to:  Directed energy, hypersonic systems, autonomous systems, artificial intelligence, space systems and threats, 6th generation aircraft, advanced acoustic and non-acoustic technologies for undersea warfare, and advanced active electronic warfare/cyber capabilities. The committee acknowledges the limitations of their data-gathering efforts based on the availability of Distribution A resources to inform their assessments. As a result of these limitations, portions of the statement of Task must be addressed by the second phase of this study, which is permitted to utilize resources at higher classification levels than permitted in this phase. Table A-1 below is a matrix to illustrate the committee’s ability to address the components laid out in the Statement of Task. The committee also recognizes the innate challenge of responding to the Statement of Task language introducing (3): “Evaluate the following attributes for each range” (emphasis added). DoD’s test and training ranges number over 500 in total, including the 23 major facilities in the MRTFB. DoD does not PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 78

currently have standardized and comprehensive reporting on test ranges and facilities that would address the items in the statement of task. To assess the current physical and technical state of the test ranges, the committee selected representative ranges spanning all domains (land, sea, air, space, and cyberspace) to provide insights on the aggregate challenges with operational testing unique to each domain. This strategy enables the committee to report on concerns and conditions that were articulated by multiple ranges, services, and agencies. The committee further recognizes that each of DoD’s test ranges will face specific challenges and opportunities unique to the individual facility or organization that are not addressed in this report. TABLE A-1 Statement of Task Completion Matrix Domains Cyber- Land Sea Air Space space Physical Suitability for Testing Capacity  Physical space **, a **, a **, a *, b **, a Infrastructure Conditions  Buildings  Equipment **, a **, a **, a *, b **, a  Digital infrastructure Cyber and analytics tools **, a **, a **, a c *, b M&S capacity **, a **, a **, a *, c *, b Recommendations to Address Test Assessment of DoD Test Ranges Deficiencies  Existing **, a **, a **, a c **, a  Anticipated Range Attributes Security Measures  Physical **, a **, a **, a c c  Cyber c c c c c Encroachment Challenges  Physical space **, a **, a **, a *, b N/A  Spectrum **, a **, a **, a *, b *, b  Competing missions **, a **, a **, a *, b **, a Electromagnetic attributes  Spectrum management **, a **, a **, a *, b **, a  Band access and utilization *, b *, b *, b c *, b  Threat emulation c c c c c Instrumentation  Assess system performance  Record test data **, a **, a **, a c **, b  Process and transmit data Key: ** Fully addressed a Publicly accessible information enabled committee to address * Partially addressed this topic (Blank) Not addressed b Limited to no publicly accessible information available c Deferred to Phase 2, due to sensitivity of topic PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 79

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Rigorous operational testing (OT) of weapon systems procured by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) is fundamental to ensuring that these sophisticated systems not only meet their stated requirements, but also perform under realistic operational conditions when faced by determined adversaries employing their own highly capable offensive and defensive weaponry. DoD's test and training range enterprise provides the geography, infrastructure, technology, expertise, processes, and management that make safe, secure, and comprehensive OT possible. The challenges facing the nation's range infrastructure are both increasing and accelerating. Limited test capacity in physical resources and workforce, the age of test infrastructure, the capability to test advanced technologies, and encroachment impact the ability to inform system performance, integrated system performance and the overall pace of testing.

Necessary DoD Range Capabilities to Ensure Operational Superiority of U.S. Defense Systems assesses the physical and technical suitability of DoD test and evaluation ranges, infrastructure, and tools for determining the operational effectiveness, suitability, survivability, and lethality of military systems. This report explores modernization, sustainment, operations, and resource challenges for test and evaluation ranges, and makes recommendations to put the DoD range enterprise on a modernization trajectory to meet the needs of OT in the years ahead.

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