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Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices (2021)

Chapter: Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Survey Instruments for Transit Agencies, Local and Regional Governments, and Private Sector Companies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26194.
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Appendix A Survey Instruments A-4 13. Site Definition: Transit Facilities a) Has your agency undertaken, or are you currently planning, Joint Development projects on surface park & ride lots? b) If yes: please describe how you determine whether to replace 100% of the affected spaces or some other percentage. Does your Joint Development Policy address this issue? c) Does your agency generally prefer to have the developer build the replacement garage, or to build it yourselves? d) Have you undertaken, or are you planning, Joint Development projects affecting transit facilities other than park & ride (such as busways, pick- up/drop-off areas, pedestrian plazas, bike stations, etc.)? e) Can you describe any “lessons learned” from your experience with transit facility design in the context of Joint Development projects? 14. Land Disposition Method a) Does your agency prefer to convey Joint Development rights through long- term ground lease or outright sale? Is there a written policy to this effect? 15. Determining Land Price and Compensation a) When your agency sells or leases property for development, is the method of determining the minimum price set by law? (For example, does your Enabling Act or other applicable law require a price at least equal to the appraised Fair Market Value?) b) Are you required to accept the highest responsible bid, or are you allowed to judge “best value” across a range of factors including price? c) In your Joint Development projects, have you structured your compensation to include a share of the development’s future performance? d) Have you used in-kind contributions as part of your compensation? For example, the developer paying to build transit components, or to operate and maintain them? 16. Project Feasibility a) In your Joint Development projects, have you encountered tension between the agency’s desired compensation, on the one hand, and project feasibility from the developer’s standpoint, on the other? b) Has this revolved around the question of which party is financially responsible for a park & ride garage or other transit facilities? c) Have you provided funding of your own, or pursued federal, state, or local infrastructure funding or development finance incentives, to enhance a project’s feasibility? If so, please describe. d) Have you used land value discounts to make projects such as affordable housing feasible? 17. Developer Solicitation a) In procuring developers, which is your agency’s preferred form of solicitation: a Request for Qualifications (RFQ), Request for Proposals (RFP), a combination of the two, or a hybrid? Can you provide a link to a typical RFQ, RFP, or other solicitation document? b) Have you used Requests for Expressions of Interest (RFEIs) to get feedback before a formal offering? If so, what was your experience? c) Does your agency have a written policy setting forth how it will respond to unsolicited Joint Development proposals?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-5 18. Developer Negotiation and Closing a) Once your agency has selected a developer, is there a Joint Development Agreement or similar type of contract that governs the period between the initial selection (or preliminary designation) and the execution of the final land disposition (the ground lease or deed of sale)? b) Are there templates of your Joint Development Agreement or final disposition agreements for which you can provide web links? 19. Design and Construction a) Once a Joint Development project is ready to proceed, what type of Design Review does your agency require? Is this process established in the Joint Development Agreement? b) Does your agency have a written manual governing developer construction on or adjoining an operating rail or bus facility? Does this include a process for interfacing with agency staff; specific rules for design and construction in close proximity to overhead or underground structures; and provisions for maintenance of operations? 20. Stakeholder Engagement a) How does your agency allocate the responsibility for stakeholder engagement and management? Once a developer is selected for a given project, do they assume most of the responsibility for stakeholder outreach, or does the lead responsibility stay with the agency? b) Does your agency make the developer, once chosen, fully responsible for development-related permits? Does the agency actively support the developer’s efforts? Are there certain permitting or approval activities that the agency reserves for itself throughout the process? c) Have neighborhood groups reacted to particular aspects of proposed Joint Development projects—such as density, affordable housing, or concerns about reduced parking? Other? d) In general, how successful has the stakeholder engagement process been in your agency’s Joint Development activity? Part D. Other Forms of Joint Development 21. Stations Funded or Built by Adjacent Developers Thus far, we’ve addressed joint development on transit agency property. An alternative form of joint development occurs when the developer of adjacent property pays for, contributes to, or actually builds a new station or a major station upgrade. a) Has your agency participated in any such projects, or have any such opportunities arisen in your transit system? (If yes, please answer question 20 if not already answered.) b) Has your agency participated in projects where an adjacent developer or property owner pays the agency for the right to build a direct pedestrian connection to the station?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-6 22. Street-Running Transit Corridors To this point, we’ve been addressing Joint Development at off-street locations, where transit agencies own station buildings, parking lots, surplus land, or air rights. Now let’s turn to services that run in the street and generally aren’t associated with off-street real estate—like bus lines, on-street bus rapid transit, streetcars, or street-running light rail lines. a) Are there locations where the City or some other public agency is assembling land and promoting TOD along one of your street-running transit corridors? If so, could there be an opportunity to engage in a real estate partnership with that public land owner? 23. Non-Station/Non- Passenger Locations Finally, some transit agencies have properties that may be suitable for Joint Development at non-station, non-passenger-related locations. These cases, while not necessarily representing transit-oriented development, may be valuable opportunities to monetize an asset. a) Does your agency own a rail or bus maintenance facility, or a vehicle yard, with excess land or air rights? Could these excess real property assets be offered for development compatible with the facility’s operation and any future expansion needs? b) Does your agency need to procure a new facility of this type? Could this facility be delivered through Joint Development? • Part E. Value Capture 24. TIF or Special Assessment Districts a) Has any local government created a Tax Increment Finance (TIF) District, California Enhanced Infrastructure Finance District (EIFD), or Special Assessment District in one or several of your station areas? b) If a TIF, does it take the form of a tax abatement to the developer, or does it generate a revenue stream to the local government? c) If a revenue stream: does any of this value capture revenue flow to your agency to support transit capital costs, or does it all stay with the City? • Part F: FTA 25. Degree of FTA Involvement In general, if a transit agency proposes a Joint Development project on land that was acquired or improved with FTA assistance, or to use FTA funds to construct certain aspects of the Joint Development project, then the project requires FTA review and approval under the provisions of FTA’s current Joint Development Guide (Circular 7050 1A). a) Was most of your agency’s operating real estate (stations, park & ride lots, maintenance yards, etc.) acquired or improved with FTA assistance? Some of your real estate (which service modes or corridors)? None of it? 26. Experience With FTA On Joint Development Projects a) Has your agency interacted with FTA about one or more actual or proposed Joint Development projects? If yes, about how many? b) Did FTA approve the project(s)? c) Please describe the process. Were there aspects that worked well? Not so well? Did you feel the process was straightforward? Confusing? d) Has your agency undertaken projects on FTA-assisted property through a process other than FTA Joint Development review (for example, by disposing of the land as surplus property)? If so, please describe.

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-7 PRIVATE SECTOR QUESTIONNAIRE What the Study is About: Joint Development Joint Development is a subset of transit-oriented development (TOD). It consists of residential, commercial, civic, or mixed-use development that is closely coordinated with a transit facility and in which the transit agency participates through the use of its property, funding, or some other form of real estate or business transaction. Joint Development often occurs on transit agency property, but can also occur through other deal structures—for example, an adjacent developer agreeing to pay for a new station or a station improvement. In this survey, we’re interested in your views—as an actor in the private- sector real estate market—about TOD in general, and about Joint Development in particular. Open-Ended Questions 1. TOD In General In your view, and based on your experience: e) What attracts developers, lenders, and investors to TOD? f) What are the principal hurdles to making TOD work, as compared to development in non-transit settings? 2. Joint Development In your view, and based on your experience: a) What attracts developers, lenders, and investors to Joint Development projects? b) What are the principal hurdles to making Joint Development work? Are there extra costs, risks, or complexities involved when undertaking development on transit agency land or in partnership with a transit agency? c) If yes: what needs to be present to make the project worth pursuing? d) Does Joint Development require the development team to have capacities or skill sets not typically required for other types of development? Specific Questions Applicable to TOD in General and Joint Development 3. Location Readiness a) How do you evaluate location readiness when considering a TOD or Joint Development opportunity? Among the usual factors—market activity, surrounding land values, transportation access, regulatory support—is there a different emphasis for TOD or Joint Development? 4. Parking a) In your experience, has local zoning required too much parking for TOD or Joint Development? Have the developer and the transit agency been on the same page with respect to parking? 5. Affordable Housing a) In your TOD or Joint Development experience, have there been specific affordable or inclusionary goals or requirements? b) Has the affordable housing been supported through density bonuses, tax credits, or other public subsidy programs? If so, please describe.

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-8 6. Development Incentives Aside from affordable housing programs: a) In your experience, do TOD or Joint Development projects require public development incentives in order to be feasible? (For example, brownfield assistance, state or local economic development finance tools, or local infrastructure grants?) b) Have you found such incentives to be reasonably available for TOD and Joint Development? 7. New Market Tax Credits and Federal Opportunity Zones a) In your experience, have New Market Tax Credits had a significant effect on the feasibility of TOD or Joint Development? If so, how? b) Do you expect the new Opportunity Zone mechanism to have a significant effect on TOD and Joint Development? 8. Community Response a) Have neighborhood groups reacted to particular aspects of proposed TOD or Joint Development permitting—such as density, affordable housing, or concerns about reduced parking? Other issues? b) If so, did those interactions result in modifications to your project or changes in the development requirements from the local jurisdiction? Specific Questions Applicable to Joint Development Projects Only 9. Joint Development Projects a) Has your company been involved in Joint Development projects, or are you actively contemplating one? • If “no” (no actual or contemplated projects), conclude. If “yes”, continue. b) Are there one or two projects that you would cite as examples of your company’s work? 10. Transit Agency Capacity for Joint Development a) In your experience, how would you characterize the capacity of transit agencies to achieve a successful Joint Development project? You might respond in terms of economic understanding, negotiating skill, design and construction oversight, or other factors. b) In your experience, have you found that transit agencies involved in joint development projects are able to speak with one voice? 11. Developer Selection a) When making a site available for Joint Development, transit agencies may use a Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI), Request for Qualifications (RFQ), a Request for Proposals (RFP), or some combination of these. Is there a method you think is most conducive to getting good proposals? b) Have you initiated a Joint Development project by making an unsolicited proposal to a transit agency? Did the project go forward?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-9 12. Zoning and Permitting a) In your experience, is the entitlement and permitting process for Joint Development projects unusually complex, compared to other projects? b) On your Joint Development project(s), who has had the lead responsibility for getting the project permitted— the transit agency or the developer? Was this division of responsibility effective and appropriate? c) Was suitable zoning in place before the transit agency made the site available for development, or did the project need zoning relief or rezoning to go forward? 13. Project Economics and Land Value a) When affordable housing is required as part of a Joint Development project, has the transit agency’s land price reflected that requirement? b) How difficult is it for transit agencies and Joint Development partners to converge on a mutually feasible land cost? What are the complicating factors? c) How common is it for the transit agency and the developer to have diverging expectations about who will pay for infrastructure and site improvements? d) Does the market require a different rate of return on Joint Development projects, compared to other TOD? 14. Overall Assessment a) Based on your experience, are there steps that transit agencies could take to make their Joint Development programs work better? Things they might do differently?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-10 LOCAL GOVERNMENT QUESTIONNAIRE What this Study is About: Joint Development Joint Development is a subset of transit-oriented development (TOD). It consists of residential, commercial, civic, or mixed-use development that is closely coordinated with a transit facility and in which the transit agency participates through the use of its property, funding, or some other form of real estate or business transaction. The community and region benefit from more sustainable growth; the transit agency benefits not only through increased ridership, but through system improvements or revenues derived from the development. This Survey In this survey, we ask questions, from your jurisdiction’s perspective, about TOD in general, as well as any Joint Development activity in which your regional transit agency may be involved. We know [jurisdiction] has been a leader in TOD. This interview is meant to provide your insight on specific topics pertaining to this study. 1. Local Land Use and Zoning Policies a) Is TOD a priority for [jurisdiction] in land use planning and zoning? b) Has [jurisdiction] included TOD policies within your comprehensive or general plan, or published an official TOD Policy? If yes: can you provide a web link to the plan or TOD Policy? c) Is TOD a permitted use in local zoning without discretionary approval? d) In your view, is local zoning generally consistent with basic TOD principles, such as higher densities, mix of uses, pedestrian and transit-friendly urban design, and reduced parking requirements in transit-served areas? Has zoning been changed in recent years to facilitate TOD? e) Is commercial, residential, or mixed-use development on transit agency property subject to local zoning? f) Has TOD been used to achieve other public policy goals, such as providing housing, supporting economic development, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, encouraging healthy communities, or promoting active transportation? 2. Transit Agency Role in TOD a) From your perspective, does the transit agency take an active role in promoting TOD? b) If yes: c) Would you say their TOD policies are generally consistent with local or regional zoning land use policy? d) Do the transit agency and [jurisdiction] work collaboratively on TOD?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-11 3. Transit Agency Joint Development Activity a) Has the transit agency undertaken, or are they planning, any Joint Development projects as defined above? b) If yes, complete (b) through (e); if no, skip to Question 4: c) Is this a single Joint Development project, two or three projects, or an ongoing program? d) How do you feel the Joint Development project(s) were managed during construction, in terms of traffic, pedestrian conditions, transit service, etc.? e) How do you feel the Joint Development project(s) turned out in the end? f) Are there steps the transit agency could take to make their Joint Development projects work better? Things they might do differently? 4. Partnering with the Transit Agency to Offer Developable Land a) Are there places where [jurisdiction] owns land, or is assembling land, near a transit station or along a transit corridor? b) If so, have you considered working with the transit agency to pool your land holdings, or to jointly prepare the land for development? c) If you and the transit agency have actually partnered in this fashion, can you describe how the process worked? How the responsibilities and shares of the development proceeds were allocated? 5. Parking a) For residential, commercial, or mixed-use development at or near transit, does local zoning require reduced parking ratios and shared parking? 6. Affordable Housing a) Does [jurisdiction] or any other jurisdiction have an affordable or inclusionary housing requirement for new development? If so, can you summarize the requirement, or provide a web link to it? b) Does the transit agency have an affordable or inclusionary housing policy of its own, which it applies to JD projects on its property? c) If both local authorities and the transit agency have affordable or inclusionary housing requirements, which is the more demanding? d) If affordable or inclusionary housing is required in Joint Development projects, do you support or assist developers in pursuing affordable housing finance or subsidy programs? 7. Development Incentives a) Aside from affordable housing programs: b) Does [jurisdiction] make development incentives available for TOD? (For example, brownfield assistance, economic development finance tools, tax abatements, local infrastructure grants, or expedited permit processing)? These might be programs offered at the local, county, or region level, or state programs in which [jurisdiction] has input.) If yes: c) Is TOD a particular priority for the use of these incentives? d) Have you provided such incentives to any Joint Development project involving the transit agency?

Appendix A Survey Instruments A-12 8. TIF or Special Assessment Districts a) Has the [jurisdiction] or any local taxing jurisdiction created a Tax Increment Finance (TIF) District, Enhanced Infrastructure Finance District (EIFD), or Special Assessment District in any station area or transit corridor? If yes: b) Is TOD a particular focus of the TIF or value capture program? c) If a TIF, does it take the form of a tax abatement to the developer, or does it generate a revenue stream to the local government? d) If a revenue stream: does any of this value capture revenue flow to the transit agency, or does it all stay with the local taxing jurisdiction? 9. Stakeholder Engagement a) Have neighborhood groups reacted to particular aspects of proposed TOD zoning or permitting—such as density, affordable housing, traffic, reduced parking, or infrastructure adequacy? Other issues? b) If so, has this led to projects being changed? c) If the transit agency is involved in a zoning request, or in a Joint Development project that requires local permitting, do they play a visible role in stakeholder outreach? d) In general, how successful has the stakeholder engagement process been with respect to TOD in general and, if applicable, Joint Development in particular?

APPENDIX B REPORT ON SURVEY OF TRANSIT AGENCIES

Appendix B Survey of Transit Agencies i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ……..B-1 2.0 Overview of Findings.......................................................................................................................................... B-1 3.0 The Joint Development Practice: Who’s Doing What ........................................................................................ B-6 3.1 Scope and Capacity ........................................................................................................................................ B- 6 3.1.1 Extent of JD activity (Question 1) ........................................................................................................... B- 6 3.1.2 Agency joint development policies (Question 4) ................................................................................... B- 7 3.1.3 Extent of agency real estate portfolio (Question 2a) ............................................................................ B- 7 3.1.4 Land assembly strategy when planning new corridors (Question 2b) ................................................... B- 8 3.1.5 Specialized skill-sets and capacities (Question 10) ............................................................................... B- 8 3.1.6 Approach to prioritizing stations and sites (Question 11a) .................................................................... B-8 3.2 Relationship to Other Jurisdictions ................................................................................................................ B-9 3.2.1 Enabling Act or equivalent authorization (Question 3) ........................................................................ B- 10 3.2.2 Relationship with land use and zoning authorities (Question 5) ......................................................... B-11 3.2.3 Stakeholder management (Question 20) ............................................................................................. B- 12 3.2.4 Institutional differences: stand-alone authorities versus government affiliates ................................. B- 13 4.0 Advancing the State of the Practice ................................................................................................................ B- 14 4.1 Joint Development Involving FTA ............................................................................................................... B- 15 4.1.1 Extent of FTA real property interest (Question 25) ............................................................................. B- 15 4.1.2 Agency experience with “FTA-assisted JD” (Question 26) ................................................................... B- 15 4.2.1 Collaborating with other public land-owners (Questions 12 and 22) .................................................. B- 16 4.2.2 Developer-built or funded stations (Question 21) ................................................................................ B-17 4.2.3 Non-station area transit facilities (Question 23) .................................................................................. B- 18 4.2.4 Value capture with elements of JD (Question 24) ............................................................................... B- 18 4.3 Joint Development Economics ................................................................................................................... B- 19 4.3.1 Hierarchy of JD goals (Question 9) ....................................................................................................... B- 19 4.3.2 Structure of developer selection criteria (Question 15) ....................................................................... B-20 4.3.3 Feasibility tradeoffs (Questions 13, 16, 11b) ....................................................................................... B- 21 4.4 High-Leverage Program Composition Issues .............................................................................................. B- 23 4.4.1 Affordable housing (Questions 20c, 6, 16d) ......................................................................................... B- 23 4.4.2 Parking (Questions 13, 16, 8) ............................................................................................................... B- 24 5.0 Best Practices in Project Execution ................................................................................................................. B- 26 5.1 Stewardship of Transit Assets ..................................................................................................................... B- 26 5.1.1 Site selection and definition (Questions 11a and 13) .......................................................................... B- 26 5.1.2 Land disposition method (Question 14) ............................................................................................... B- 28 5.1.3 Design and construction review (Question 19) .................................................................................... B- 28

Appendix B Survey of Transit Agencies ii 5.2 Developer Procurement and Negotiations ................................................................................................. B- 30 5.2.1 Solicitation methods (Question 17) ..................................................................................................... B- 30 5.2.2 Negotiation and closing methods (Question 18) ................................................................................. B- 31 LIST OF TABLES Table B-1: Summary of Transit Agencies Surveyed .................................................................................................. B-2 Table B-2: Outline of This Memorandum .................................................................................................................. B-5 Table B-3: Scale of JD Activity (Question 1) ............................................................................................................... B-6 Table B-4: Official JD Policies (Question 4) ................................................................................................................ B-7 Table B-5: Developable Real Estate Portfolios (Question 2a) .................................................................................... B-7 Table B-6: Strategic Acquisition Strategy (Question 2b) ............................................................................................ B-8 Table B-7: Special Features of Affiliated Transit Agencies ....................................................................................... B-14 Table B-8: Extent of FTA Interest in System Real Estate (Question 25) ................................................................... B-15 Table B-9: Experience with FTA/JD Process (Question 26) ...................................................................................... B-16 Table B-10: Structure of Developer Selection Criteria (Question 15) ...................................................................... B-21 Table B-11: Summary of Responses re Feasibility Tradeoffs (Multiple Questions) ................................................. B-23 Table B-12: Transit Agency Affordable Housing Requirements (Question 6) .......................................................... B-24 Table B-13: Park & Ride Replacement Policies (Question 13) ................................................................................. B-25 Table B-14: Agency Observations on Station Selection and Site Definition ............................................................ B-27 Table B-15: Level of Joint Development Design Review (Question 19) ................................................................... B-29 Table B-16: Use of Developer Solicitation Formats (Question 17a,b) .................................................................... B-30

Appendix B Survey of Transit Agencies B-1 SURVEY OF TRANSIT AGENCIES 1.0 Introduction The research team for TCRP Research Report 224: A Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies (“the Guide”) undertook a targeted stakeholder outreach program. Three distinct outreach efforts were conducted in the period of March through July 2019, and they are reported in three separate appendices:1 • Appendix B: Transit Agencies (this document); • Appendix C: Private Sector Companies; • Appendix D: Local and Regional Governments. The data collected in this effort is rich in content and nuance and played a significant role in the formulation of the Guide. The research team is grateful to the 32 transit agencies, 18 local government jurisdictions, and 17 private sector developers and investors that contributed their time and enthusiasm. The completed questionnaires, comprising well over 400 pages of original data, will be archived in the project files. As we indicated to the respondents, these actual questionnaire documents were produced for internal use only and will not be included in the Guide. While the agencies and corporations that participated in this survey are listed in their respective appendices, in reporting the data individual respondents are never identified, and their agencies or corporations are identified by name only, with respect to factual information readily available on-line such as the names and key features of joint development projects, or salient features of their Enabling Acts and published policies. The team surveyed 32 transit agencies—30 in the United States, and two (Metrolinx and TransLink) in Canada. The selected agencies were chosen to represent a diverse cross-section of the transit community—different regions; different modes of transit service, including seven agencies that run bus- only or bus- and streetcar-only systems; legacy systems and newer ones; agencies long known for their joint development programs and others just now becoming involved in joint development projects. The four transit agencies represented on the TCRP H-57 project panel—King County Metro, Metro Transit, the Utah Transit Authority (“UTA”), and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (“WMATA”)—were all included. 1 In addition, the leaders of three non-profit organizations were interviewed; they were selected for their roles in championing or opposing significant transit-oriented or joint development projects.

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Joint development is a subset of transit‐oriented development. It consists of residential, commercial, civic, or mixed‐use development that is closely coordinated with a transit facility and in which the transit agency participates through the use of its property, funding, or some other form of real estate or business transaction.

The TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program's TCRP Web-Only Document 73: Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies: Appendices provides supplemental information to TCRP Research Report 224: Guide to Joint Development for Public Transportation Agencies.

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